Performance Report as of March 31, 2014

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

ISSN number : 1490-7380

Catalog number : Iu90-1/13-2014E-PDF

Publish date : November 5, 2014

Summary :

This report deals with Canada Economic Development's principal achievements in regards to its engagements towards the Parliament.

Table of Contents

  1. Disclaimer
  2. Minister's Message
  3. Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview
  4. Section II : Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
  5. Section III - Supplementary Information
  6. Section IV : Organizational Contact Information
  7. Appendix - Definitions
  8. Endnotes
  9. Supplementary Tables

Disclaimer

Departmental Performance Reports are part of the Estimates family of documents. Estimates documents support appropriation acts, which specify the amounts and broad purposes for which funds can be spent by the government. The Estimates document family has three parts:

Part I – Government Expenditure Plan provides an overview of federal spending.

Part II – Main Estimates lists the financial resources required by individual departments, agencies and Crown corporations for the upcoming fiscal year..

Part III – Departmental Expenditure Plans consists of two documents. Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) are expenditure plans for each appropriated department and agency (excluding Crown corporations). They describe departmental priorities, strategic outcomes, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three-year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) are individual department and agency accounts of actual performance, for the most recently completed fiscal year, against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in their respective RPPs. DPRs inform parliamentarians and Canadians of the results achieved by government organizations for Canadians.

Additionally, Supplementary Estimates documents present information on spending requirements that were either not sufficiently developed in time for inclusion in the Main Estimates or were subsequently refined to account for developments in particular programs and services.

The financial information in DPRs is drawn directly from authorities presented in the Main Estimates and the planned spending information in RPPs. The financial information in DPRs is also consistent with information in the Public Accounts of Canada. The Public Accounts of Canada include the Government of Canada Consolidated Statement of Financial Position, the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Accumulated Deficit, the Consolidated Statement of Change in Net Debt, and the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow, as well as details of financial operations segregated by ministerial portfolio for a given fiscal year. For the DPR, two types of financial information are drawn from the Public Accounts of Canada: authorities available for use by an appropriated organization for the fiscal year, and authorities used for that same fiscal year. The latter corresponds to actual spending as presented in the DPR.

The Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures further strengthens the alignment of the performance information presented in DPRs, other Estimates documents and the Public Accounts of Canada. The policy establishes the Program Alignment Architecture of appropriated organizations as the structure against which financial and non-financial performance information is provided for Estimates and parliamentary reporting. The same reporting structure applies irrespective of whether the organization is reporting in the Main Estimates, the RPP, the DPR or the Public Accounts of Canada.

A number of changes have been made to DPRs for 2013-14 to better support decisions on appropriations. Where applicable, DPRs now provide financial, human resources and performance information in Section II at the lowest level of the organization’s Program Alignment Architecture.

In addition, the DPR’s format and terminology have been revised to provide greater clarity, consistency and a strengthened emphasis on Estimates and Public Accounts information. As well, departmental reporting on the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy has been consolidated into a new supplementary information table posted on departmental websites. This new table brings together all of the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy formerly presented in DPRs and on departmental websites, including reporting on the Greening of Government Operations and Strategic Environmental Assessments. Section III of the report provides a link to the new table on the organization’s website. Finally, definitions of terminology are now provided in an appendix.

Minister's Message

Minister’s MessageI am proud to submit to Parliament the Departmental Performance Report of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) for the period ended March 31, 2014.

Over the past few years, the measures taken by the Government of Canada have contributed to making Canada’s the highest performing G7 economy in several respects. Of all the G7 countries, Canada has posted the strongest employment growth since the recovery in 2009.

Over the past 12 months, in line with its mandate and the Government of Canada’s priorities, CED continued to support the economic growth of the different regions of Quebec by supporting enterprises and communities.

CED pursued its efforts in that regard through the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, aimed at supporting communities affected by the decline in that industry. It also helped support the upgrading and enhancement of existing community infrastructure in the regions of Quebec through the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund.

In the wake of the tragic events of July 2013, CED wasted no time implementing the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, in order to support that community’s economic recovery and rebuilding.

Through its Quebec Economic Development Program, CED invested some $198 million in grants and contributions to boost enterprises’ growth. Its actions fostered entrepreneurship, business productivity, exports, commercialization and innovation throughout Quebec.

I invite you to peruse this report, which shows that CED’s intervention is closely geared to the economic realities of Quebec and contributes to the development of enterprises and the dynamism of Quebec’s regions.

Denis Lebel
Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and Intergovernmental Affairs and
Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview

1.1 Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honorable Denis Lebel

Deputy Head: Marie Lemay

Ministerial Portfolio: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Year Established: 2005

Main Legislative Authorities: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ActFootnote1

 

1.2 Organizational Context

1.2.1 Raison d’être and Responsibilities

Object

Under its Act,Footnote2 which came into effect on October 5, 2005, CED’s object is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.”

Strategic Outcome

Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Vision

Quebec regions and enterprises participate to their full potential in the economy of tomorrow, building on their respective assets.

 

As part of its mission, CED promotes the start-up and growth of businesses. It helps them become more competitive, productive, innovative and active on domestic and foreign markets. It supports communities’ engagement efforts in Quebec’s regions and helps to attract investment that will increase the prosperity of the Quebec and Canadian economies.

CED thus contributes to the economic vitality of all Quebec regions, by paying special attention to communities with low economic growth, as stipulated in its enabling Act. In this respect, the CED uses an Economic Development IndexFootnote3 which allows it, among other things, to determine the economic development levels of Quebec’s 104 Quebec communitiesFootnote4 in order to meet needs effectively.

CED works with businesses, primarily small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as non-profit organizations (NPOs) through its business offices.Footnote5 By providing financial assistance for projects, among other things, CED supports their development efforts.

CED’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development.Footnote6 It is:

CED’s Grants and Contributions Programs and Initiatives, 2013–14Footnote7

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

  • Ad-hoc initiatives
    • Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
    • Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI)
    • Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF)

Canada-wide program implemented in Quebec by CED:

  • Community Futures Program (CFP)

Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for administration in Quebec:Footnote8

  • Building Canada Fund–Quebec (BCF)
  • Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (FIMR)
 

1.2.2 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

This report is structured according to CED’s Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), which came into effect on April 1, 2012. The following list presents CED’s complete framework of four programs and seven sub-programs,Footnote9 the links among them, and the strategic outcome to which they contribute.

1.2.3 Organizational Priorities

Priorities represent the areas on which CED has decided to focus. They are established on the basis of Government of Canada priorities, departmental risks and targeted results, and the economic challenges of Quebec’s different regions. During FY 2013–14, CED implemented the following three priorities, which are in line with those presented in its most recent Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs):

Priority #1 Type Link to Program
Contribute to Quebec’s long-term economic growth and prosperity by supporting enterprises’ growth (directly or via NPOs), while paying particular attention to communities with lower growth potential Ongoing
(wording revised since FY 2012–13)
1.1
Business Development
Summary of Progress
  • CED continued its support for business development in 2013–14, contributing among other things to strengthening the competitiveness of Quebec’s manufacturing sector.Footnote10 The total share of assistance approved for this priority held steady in 2013–14 when compared with 2012–13, amounting to 67% of total assistance approved by CED under its programs.Footnote11
  • CED signed 348 new contribution agreements with regard to this priority in 2013–14, representing $125.0 million in approved financial assistance. Of these:
    • 60 were intended to support entrepreneurship, for $21.4 million in approved financial assistance. These were new projects aimed at business pre-startups and startups;
    • 181 concerned support for productivity and expansion of enterprises; approved assistance for these projects totalled $67.9 million;
    • 42 were signed to foster innovation and technology transfer, totalling $22.1 million in approved assistance;
    • 65 concernaient l’appui à la commercialisation et l’exportation, soit 13,6 millions de dollars en aide approuvée.
    • 65 concerned support for commercialization and exports, for $13.6 million in approved assistance.
  • CED paid special attention to communities experiencing slow economic growth:Footnote12 38% of new contribution agreements associated with business development were located in these communities (131 projects), for 37% of approved assistance ($46.9 million). These communities account for 21% of the total population of Quebec.
Priority #2 Type Link to Program
Contribute to strengthening the economy of the regions and communities through targeted ad-hoc support Priority previously committed to during FY 2012–13
(wording revised)
1.3
Strengthening of Community Economies
Summary of Progress
  • CED continued to implement the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF), in effect until March 31, 2014. The purpose of the CIIF was to support the upgrading and enhancement of existing community infrastructure.
    • 230 new contribution agreements signed in 2013–14;
    • $23.1 million in approved assistance for these projects;
    • Enhancement of the quality of community facilties and economic spinoffs in 80 communities in Quebec.
  • CED has implemented two new initiatives to provide particularly vulnerable communities with targeted ad-hoc support:
  1. Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Has a budget envelope of $50 million over seven years;
    • Aims to accompany communities and businesses in the Des Appalaches and Des Sources RCMs in their efforts to diversify and strengthen their economic base and thus increase their long-term growth potential;
    • 126 meetings with potential clients and economic development partners took place in the areas served;
    • 11 contribution agreements signed in 2013–14, for $3.7 million in approved assistance.
  2. Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
    • With a budget envelope of $35 million over seven years, it is divided into three components: reconstruction of the town, direct assistance to enterprises, and creation of two investment funds managed by the Mégantic-area Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC);
    • Aims to provide support for the economic recovery and rebuilding of the town in the aftermath of the rail accident of July 6, 2013;
    • Deployment of a dedicated team in the field to accompany local stakeholders in their economic development efforts. Between the launch of the Initiative and March 2014, the team took part in more than 55 meetings with entrepreneurs, town officials and local economic agents;
    • Four contribution agreements signed, for $6 million in total assistance.
Priority #3 Type Link to Program
Continue the Agency’s modernization and transformation Ongoing
(wording revised since FY 2011–12)
All
Summary of Progress

In 2013–14, CED continued and accelerated implementation of its transformation and modernization initiatives. The Blueprint 2020 government initiative launched during FY 2013–14 provided further backing for what CED had already undertaken in that regard.

CED completed several modernization projects for which it was the implementing authority. It influenced and adjusted to developments in other departments’ plans with respect to implementation of government-wide initiatives in that respect. In the wake of Blueprint 2020, CED set up several mobilization and consultation activities across the organization, and developed an action plan that will run until 2020.

More accessible, more modern services and programs aimed at providing service more closely geared to CED clients

  • CED completed the integration in 2013–14 of risk management in several of the main stages in the grants and contributions management process.
  • CED used an online form to put out calls for proposals for the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, thus facilitating transactions with its clientele.

A more modern, stimulating, efficient work environment

  • CED implemented the vision of Blueprint 2020, stemming from the priorities of the Clerk of the Privy Council. All CED employees were consulted to turn the vision of the Public Service into reality. More than 400 ideas were put forward and analysed. Arising from dialogue concerning Blueprint 2020, a Destination 2020 action plan was drawn up. Implementation of this plan has already begun, thus enabling CED to help build the Public Service of the future.

1.2.4 Risk Analysis

In 2013–14, CED had identified one external risk—economic risk and institutional capability—and three internal risks—change management, human resources management, and information management. During the year, CED implemented the planned mitigation strategies, and was thus able to manage its risks and achieve the anticipated results.

The following table presents risks, some examples of mitigation strategies implemented, their link to the PAA, and their link to organizational priorities.
Corporate Risks Risk Response Strategies Link to PAA Link to Priorities
External Risk
Economic Risk and Institutional Capacity
Risk that the pursuit of priorities and results expected from CED’s economic development programs may be affected (negatively or positively) by the economic context
  • Selection of intervention priorities and drafting of policy statements and intervention tools while conducting ongoing watch
  • Consultation of the other regional development agencies, central agencies and other federal departments on a timely basis
  • Operational risk policy for grants and contributions management
  • CED’s external communications strategy, aiming to make CED’s priorities and intervention known on a timely basis
Strategic Outcome

Quebec’s regions have a growing economy
#1, #2
Internal Risks
Management of change in a context of transformation of the Public Service
Risk that the planned implementation of CED’s pillars for modernization and change management may be affected
  • Ongoing watch of government transformation initiatives carried out with influence on decision-making processes
  • Active participation on established committees
  • Review of intervention priorities through planning and regular tracking of CED priorities
  • Communications plan with respect to CED’s transformation areas
Strategic Outcome

Quebec’s regions have a growing economy
#3
Human Resources Management
Risk that CED may not have sufficient capacity to attain its results and maintain compliance with all its obligations
  • Regular tracking of activities through integrated planning and reallocation of resources on the basis of needs and priorities
  • Integrated HR plan, including start of implementation of the Directive on Performance Management and review of our common operational processes with respect to HR
  • Action plan in response to the Public Service Employee Survey
  • Plan on values and ethics
  • Ongoing discussions with labour unions
  • Internal communications and employee engagement plan
  • Implementation of the Blueprint 2020 initiative
  • Compliance tracking through active monitoring and internal control
  • Simplification of administrative processes (e.g., integration of risk management for project analysis)
Strategic Outcome
-
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy
#1, #2, #3

Information Management

Risk that CED may not have reliable, relevant information on a timely basis to support its decision-making, reporting, and transformation needs

  • Systematic, consistent documentation of decision-making with respect to grants and contributions
  • Continued training on financial analysis
  • Dashboards developed to support decision-making
  • Staff training, accompaniment and control measures to ensure the reliability of systems information
  • Information management strategy updated to ensure implementation of electronic document management
Strategic Outcome
-
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy
#1, #2, #3

1.3 Actual Expenditures

This section provides an overview of financial and human resources, along with a summary table portraying CED’s performance in 2013–14.

Financial ResourcesFootnote13 for 2013–14Footnote14 (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
254,931,372 254,931,372 307,891,696 269,305,817 14,374,445

The difference between total authorities and actual spending is primarily attributable to the awarding of $35 million in additional funding at the end of FY 2013–14 for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. CED has taken the necessary steps to meet the community’s needs over the next few years through these funds.

In 2013–14, the 5.6% difference observed between actual and planned spending is primarily attributable to the deferral of appropriations from the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund during the year.

Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTE)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual minus planned)
314 332 18

In 2013–14, CED had to adapt during the year to meet the challenges and issues of Quebec enterprises and communities. Thus, it adjusted its resource allocation among the programs in its PAA as provided for in the RPP in 2013–14, including internal services. The Strengthening of Community Economies and Internal Services programs were in greater demand in 2013–14 than had been anticipated in the RPP for that fiscal year, and this explains the difference between actual and planned resources.

In fact, with respect to the Strengthening of Community Economies program, the additional FTEs enabled CED to support 230 new contribution agreements in 2013–14 through the CIIF, and to design and implement the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile and the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic.

On the internal services front, additional FTEs enabled CED to continue and accelerate implementation of its transformation and modernization projects while adjusting for the deployment of such government initiatives as the implementation of common operational processes with respect to human resources and new directives concerning travel or performance management. All additional efforts invested in 2013–14 under this program will help CED meet its commitments in due course.

Furthermore, the distribution of human resources by PAA program and sub-program in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2013–14 was presented as a guide only. Adjustments in the method for distributing human resources by PAA program and sub-program will be reflected in the RPP 2015–16. The method will more closely reflect actual FTE consumption over the past few years.

Table 1 – Budgetary Performance Summary by Strategic Outcome and ProgramsFootnote15 (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services Main Estimates 2013-2014 Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use 2013–14Footnote16 Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016Footnote17 2013-2014 2012-2013 2011-2012Footnote18
Strategic Outcome #1: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.
Program 1.1:
Business Development
152,565,372 152,565,372 146,609,271 131,455,948 153,560,384 147,594,134 130,483,270 N/A
Program 1.2:
Regional Economic Development
39,283,744 39,283,744 48,507,929 43,456,821 39,482,396 39,132,388 44,054,296 N/A
Program 1.3:
Strengthening of Community Economies
48,271,536 48,271,536 38,816,648 37,444,602 99,103,811Footnote19 64 286 545 102 808 455 N/A
Subtotal -
Strategic Outcome #1
240,120,652 240,120,652 233,933,847 212,357,371 292,146,591 251,013,067 277,346,021 282,911,939
Subtotal -
Internal Services
14,810,720 14,810,720 13,906,770 13,985,074 15,745,105 18,292,750 19,083,325 23,008,956
TOTAL 254,931,372 254,931,372 247,840,617 226,342,445 307,891,696 269,305,817 296,429,346 305,920,895

Performance Analysis by PAA Program

For FY 2013–14, CED’s total grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures stood at $269.3 million. Of that, $225.9 million was invested in G&C in projects aimed at economic development.

a. Performance of PAA programs, excluding Internal Services

Table 1 shows that CED’s actual spending for 2013–14, aside from expenditures associated with its internal services, reached $251.0 million, thus accounting for 93.2% of its total actual spending. This broke down among CED’s PAA programs as follows:

  • 59% for Business Development;
  • 15% for Regional Economic Development;
  • 26% for Strengthening of Community Economies.

As previously mentioned, CED’s programs are flexible so as to adjust continually to the challenges and issues of Quebec’s enterprises and different regions. This was reflected in 2013–14 in the implementation of ad-hoc initiatives and an increase in business volume which required resource adjustments. The variance between CED’s forecasts and its actual spending among PAA programs is attributable to the nature and type of projects submitted by promoters and reflects local needs with regard to economic development. In fact, the design and implementation of projects supported by CED depends on local and regional enterprises and stakeholders. As a result, there is considerable interdependence between the dynamics of all the agents involved and CED’s results.

More specifically, the awarding of supplementary appropriations for delivery in Quebec of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund and funding of the Canada-Quebec Agreements to Support Sustainable Management of Quebec Forests are the main reasons behind the variance observed between CED’s actual spending and its forecasts in 2013–14 in the Strengthening of Community Economies program.

While CED will continue delivering the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile and the Canada-wide Linguistic Duality Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018, it nevertheless anticipates a decline in its spending over the next two years (2014–15 and 2015–16) owing to the end of funding for such temporary initiatives as the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, to the tune of $29.3 million.

b. Performance of Internal Services

The actual spending trend with respect to the Internal Services program is downward, falling from $23 million in 2011–12 to $18.3 million in 2013–14. This decline is the outcome of the organization’s efforts to comply with government deficit reduction policy.

 

1.4 Alignment of Spending to Whole-of-Government Framework

2013–14 Spending by Whole-of-Government Framework Spending AreaFootnotei (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Programs Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome Actual Spending
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy 1.1 Business Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 147,594,134
1.2 Regional Economic Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 39,132,388
1.3 Strengthening of Community Economies Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 64,286,545
1.4 Internal Services Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 18,292,750
Total Spending 2013–14 by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 254,931,372
Social Affairs -
International Affairs -
Government Affairs -

1.5 Departmental Spending Trend

The figure below shows CED’s actual and planned spending trend. The solid bar corresponds to grants and contributions (G&C) expenditures and operating expenditures under its programs,Footnote20 while the greyed-out bar indicates those associated with sunset programs.Footnote21

Figure 1: Actual SpendingFootnote22 and Planned SpendingFootnote23 Trend, April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2017Footnote24

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend

Long Description

The figure above shows a 12% drop in CED’s spending between 2011–12 and 2013–14, from $305.9 million to $269.3 million. Since Canada was hit by the global economic slowdown, the federal government had launched Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) to stimulate the country’s economy. CED had been called upon to contribute through the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF) and the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) program, and this had a significant impact on its budget and planned spending.

CED’s total planned spending was down in 2014–15, to $247.8 million. The decline in sunset program budgets is attributable to the end of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund program. But CED will be continuing delivery in 2014–15 of the two ad-hoc initiatives in Quebec, namely, the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile (2013¬–2020) and the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. CED will also continue delivering the Canada-wide Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (2013–2018).

In CED’s programs, the slight rise of $3.8 million in planned spending between 2013–14 ($236 million) and 2014¬–15 ($240 million) is primarily attributable to the increased reinvestment of revenues from clients’ repayment of contributions. The same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2015–16 and 2016–17, since the authority has not been obtained at this stage.

For 2016–17, a supplementary budget of $4.5 million is planned for the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile. This explains the variance observed between 2015–16 and 2016–17 for the sunset program budget.

 

First of all, the figure above shows a 12% drop in CED’s spending between 2011–12 and 2013–14, from $305.9 million to $269.3 million. Since Canada was hit by the global economic slowdown, the federal government had launched Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) to stimulate the country’s economy. CED had been called upon to contribute through the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF) and the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) program, and this had a significant impact on its budget and planned spending.

CED’s total planned spending was down in 2014–15, to $247.8 million. The decline in sunset program budgets is attributable to the end of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund program. But CED will be continuing delivery in 2014–15 of the two ad-hoc initiatives in Quebec, namely, the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile (2013¬–2020) and the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. Footnote25 CED will also continue delivering the Canada-wide Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (2013–2018).

In CED’s programs, the slight rise of $3.8 million in planned spending between 2013–14 ($236 million) and 2014–15 ($240 million) is primarily attributable to the increased reinvestment of revenues from clients’ repayment of contributions. The same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2015–16 and 2016–17, since the authority has not been obtained at this stage.Footnote26

For 2016–17, a supplementary budget of $4.5 million is planned for the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile. This explains the variance observed between 2015–16 and 2016–17 for the sunset program budget.

1.6 Estimates by Vote

For information on CED’s voted appropriations and/or statutory expenditures, please visit the Public Accounts of Canada 2014 on the Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) website.Footnoteii

Section II : Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section provides information on CED’s results for 2013–14 in relation to planned outcomes, on the basis of the programs and sub-programs in its PAA.Footnoteiii

1. Strategic Outcome – Quebec's Regions have a growing Economy

Program 1.1.
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Program 1.2.
REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Program 1.3.
STRENGTHENING OF COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

Subprogram 1.1.1.:
SUPPORT FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Sub-program 1.2.1.:
MOBILIZATION OF REGIONS

Sub-program 1.3.1.:
COMMUNITY FUTURES PROGRAM

Sub-program 1.1.2.:
ENTERPRISES' PERFORMANCE

Sub-program 1.2.2.:
INVESTMENT IN THE REGIONS

Sub-program 1.3.2.:
MODERNIZATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE

Subprogram 1.3.3.:
AD-HOC TARGETED SUPPORT

Program 1.4.
INTERNAL SERVICES

2.1 Strategic Outcome (SO): Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

Overall Performance
CED Overall Results Performance
2013-2014

Total number of projects supportedFootnote27

Total number of projects approvedFootnote28

Total actual spending

Leverage effectFootnote29

1,150 projects supported

646 projects approved

$225.9 million

$2.62 for every dollar invested by CED

Performance Indicators Targets Actual ResultsFootnote30 Attainment date
Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their gross domestic product 17 NA April 1, 2017
Percentage of Quebec RCMsFootnote31 and equivalent territories having improved their economic performanceFootnote32 65% NA April 1, 2017

Performance Analysis

For FY 2013–14, CED’s overall performance was positive. In fact, it contributed to the economic prosperity and growth of Quebec’s regions.

CED makes a difference in the regions of Quebec through its action

CED fosters the advancement of Canada-wide economic development priorities and strategies in Quebec

CED is transforming itself and modernizing its procedures to serve its clients more effectively

2.2 Program 1.1 – Business Development

Strategic Outcome 1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.1
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Sub-program 1.1.1
SUPPORT FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Sub-program 1.1.2
ENTERPRISES' PERFORMANCE

Description

The Business Development program supports enterprises throughout their life cycle so as to sustain Quebec’s economic growth. Enterprises, SMEs in particular, are an engine of economic development. They are recognized as generating a significant share of economic activity and creating employment in communities.

CED contributes to renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec by supporting the emergence of new SMEs and business succession. It also works to increase the competitiveness of existing enterprises and support their survival by enhancing their performance. It does so by encouraging them to modernize, expand, launch or extend their export activities, reinforce their innovation capability, commercialize, and establish partnerships.

CED acts with regard to Business Development through its G&C program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP). It intervenes primarily with respect to enterprises and non-profit organizations (NPOs) providing support for enterprises or entrepreneurs.

Program Financial Resources,Footnote35 2013–14 (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
152,565,372 152,565,372 153,560,384 147,594,134 (4,971,238)
Program Human Resources,Footnote36 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
(Actual minus planned)
147 130 (17)
Program Performance Results, 2013–14
Program 1.1: Business Development
Overall Results Performance

Number of projects supportedFootnote37

Actual spending

Share of CED’s actual spending

652 projects

$129.7 million

57.4%Footnote38

Final Results ExpectedFootnote39
(measurable after three years)
Performance Indicators Targets
(March 31, 2015)
Results
(2013–14)Footnote40
The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed Survival rate after three years of enterprises receiving startup support 55% 86%
Survival rate after three years of enterprises receiving transfer support 60% N/AFootnote41
Quebec enterprises are competitive Survival rate after three years of enterprises receiving development support 75% 97%

Performance Analysis and lessons Learned

In 2013–14, CED contributed under the Business Development program to renewing the pool of enterprises and enhancing the competitiveness of existing enterprises.

In Quebec and Canada, a little less than two thirds of enterprises survive two years after their creation, and about one third reach the fifth year. Once Year 5 is past, the survival rate is higher, and tends to level off. The survival rate is lower among enterprises receiving startup support from CED than among those receiving development support.

Moreover, enterprises supported by CED generally post a higher survival rate than other enterprises. On the one hand, the assistance awarded supports their survival by enhancing their performance, while on the other hand, those enterprises’ ability to complete their projects is verified before CED provides its support.

In this regard, Statistics Canada concluded in a study carried out in 2013Footnote42 that enterprises having received support from CED averaged a higher survival rate (85.3%) than a control group consisting of non-clients (77.5%) after five years of operation.

2.2.1 Sub-program 1.1.1 – Support for entrepreneurship

Description

The Support for entrepreneurship subprogram is aimed at increasing the pool of enterprises in Quebec. Entrepreneurial dynamism is lower in Quebec than in the rest of Canada,Footnote43 and is expected to deteriorate in the years to come.Footnote44 CED hopes to boost entrepreneurial dynamism throughout Quebec. It does so on the one hand by encouraging business pre-startups and startups, and on the other hand by supporting the survival of existing enterprises through succession planning and enterprise transfers.

CED acts in the Support for entrepreneurship sub-program through its grants and contributions (G&C) program, the QEDP. Its intervention takes place in relation to enterprises and NPOs that support enterprises or entrepreneurs, such as entrepreneurship centres, incubators, and transfer and spinoff organizations.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote45 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote46

21,033,150

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

19

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Actual Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.1.1: Support for entrepreneurship

Enterprises are started up or transferred

Number of enterprises started up

125

125

Number of enterprises transferred

5

N/AFootnote47

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The entrepreneurial deficit is a major issue in Quebec. It has an impact on enterprises’ startup and succession. The literature review in the Summative Evaluation of the Business Startup and Succession Fund and the Business Support FundFootnotevii carried out in 2013–14 revealed that the closure rate among entrepreneurs is high, and the main barrier to startups for potential entrepreneurs is lack of funding.

For FY 2013–14, CED contributed to the startup of 125 new enterprises in Quebec, thus attaining its target. As to the number of enterprises transferred, CED’s support is seen indirectly in the Enterprises’ performance sub-program.

CED considers that it fostered renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec during 2013–14. It supported the implementation of 116 projects to stimulate the creation of enterprises or the transfer of existing enterprises. In 2013–14, CED’s financial assistance in entrepreneurship amounted to $18.3 million.

2.2.2 Sub-program 1.1.2 – Enterprises’ performance

Description

The goal of the Enterprises’ performance sub-program is to increase Quebec enterprises’ performance and competitiveness. The productivity of the Quebec economy is lower than the average for the Rest of Canada,Footnote48 and productivity gains will be realized among other things through investment carried out by Quebec enterprises.

In fact, in the context of slow economic growth and growing global competition, Quebec enterprises wishing to develop or ensure their survival have to innovate and convert their ideas into business opportunities, enhance their productivity and penetrate new markets.

CED accompanies enterprises from the different regions of Quebec to help them meet these challenges. It does so by encouraging them to invest to optimize their production and increase their efforts with respect to innovation, technology transfer, commercialization and exports. CED also supports the structuring of business networks in which enterprises operate.

CED acts on Enterprises’ performance through its grants and contributions (G&C) program, the QEDP. Its intervention in this sub-program is aimed at enterprises and NPOs that support enterprises or entrepreneurs, such as regional export promotion organizations (ORPEXs) and college centres for technology transfer (CCTTs). CED also funds Canada Business Network (CBN) activities.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote49 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote50

126,560,985

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

111

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Actual Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.1.2: Enterprises’ performance

Enterprises improve their performance

Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenueFootnote51

65%

67%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CED’s performance in 2013–14 in the Enterprises’ performance sub-program fulfilled expectations. Despite the challenges it had to face, Canada’s economy bounced back, posting a recovery. In that context, Quebec enterprises took advantage of low interest rates to expand their facilities, optimize their production chains, or even develop new products, services and processes. Thus, during 2013–14, CED supported 536 projects, to the tune of $111.4 million, to sustain the prosperity and competitiveness of Quebec enterprises.

As already mentioned, CED intervenes directly with enterprises, and also reaches them through NPOs. Through its action, CED contributed in 2013–14 to the development of more than 4,520 enterprises. Of that number:

CED continued its support for the Canada Business Network (CBN) service centres in Quebec (Info entrepreneurs in Montreal, and Ressources entreprises in Quebec City). These provide information and referral services to guide entrepreneurs toward specialized resources. In 2013–14, these two centres responded to 23,380 information requests. CED’s financial support through its operating budget represents $1.9 million in total investment.

Also, 67% of the enterprises receiving support from CED in their projects to improve their performance saw their sales or self-generated revenue increase. More specifically, this proportion is even higher (71%) for enterprises which carried out productivity and expansion projects. The proportion is 50% for enterprises that carried out innovation and technology transfer projects, and 68% for enterprises having carried out commercialization and exports projects.

Furthermore, the study conducted in 2013 by Statistics CanadaFootnote52 on the net impact of CED’s intervention in relation to enterprises confirms that assistance from CED increases enterprises’ chances of success. Enterprises receiving support from CED generally perform more strongly than the control group, in terms both of sales and of productivity and employment.

2.3 Program 1.2 – Regional Economic Development

Strategic Outcome #1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.2
REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Subprogram 1.2.1
MOBILIZATION OF REGIONS

Subprogram 1.2.2
INVESTMENT IN THE REGIONS

Description

The Regional Economic Development program is intended to strengthen the regions’ economic base so as to sustain the growth of Quebec’s economy. Quebec’s regions are set apart, among other things, by their industrial structure, and some are more sensitive to economic fluctuations. Quebec’s prosperity depends on the participation of the different regions in the economy, to their full potential.

CED wishes to contribute to building strong, competitive regions. It does so by supporting local communities as they take charge of their economic development, and by stimulating investment in all Quebec regions. CED acts on Regional Economic Development through its grants and contributions (G&C) program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP). It intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations (NPOs) active in economic development.

Program Financial Resources,Footnote53 2013–14 (dollars)

Main Estimates

Planned Spending

Total Authorities Available for Use

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

39,283,744

39,283,744

39,482,396

39,132,388

(151,356)

Program Human Resources,Footnote54 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

38

12

(26)

Program Performance Results, 2013–14

Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development

Overall Results

Performance

Number of projects supported

Actual spending

Share of CED’s actual spending

113 projets

36,2 millions de dollars

16%

Final Results Expected (measurable after three years)

Performance Indicators

Targets
(March 31, 2015)

Results
(2013–14)

Quebec regions have a stronger economic base

Amount of total investment generated in regions supported that have completed implementation of their development projectFootnote55

90M$

62M$Footnote56

Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported

9G$

6.7G$Footnote57

Amount of direct foreign investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported

1.8G$

2.5G$Footnote58

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance obtained in 2013–14 under the Regional Economic Development program indicates that CED is on track to attain its targets.

During 2013–14, CED invested $36.2 million in 113 projects to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions.

Throughout the year, CED contributed to creating new opportunities in Quebec regions by building on their respective assets. In 2013–14, CED and its project-partner fund providers generated $52.4 million in investment in the regions by encouraging local communities to carry out their development projects. Since April 1, 2012, projects receiving support from CED have generated some $62 million in investment.

CED also contributed to attracting tourists to the different regions of Quebec from other provinces and outside Canada. The most recent data provided by Tourisme Québec show that those tourists spent $3.4 billion in Quebec regions in 2012, up slightly from 2011 ($3.3 billion).Footnote59 CED appears to be on track to attain its cumulative target of $9 billion as of March 31, 2015.

CED fostered the attraction of investment from foreign firms and international agencies. It contributed to attracting $1.65 billion in investment in 2013. This performance is attributable to the establishment and expansion in Greater Montreal of several subsidiaries of foreign corporations. This foreign direct investment was primarily concentrated in the aerospace, life sciences, health technology, and information technology and communications industries.Footnote60 Since 2011–12, CED has contributed to attracting $2.5 billion in investment, thus surpassing its target for March 31, 2015.

2.3.1 Sub-program 1.2.1 – Mobilization of regions

Description

The Mobilization of regions sub-program is aimed at supporting local communities as they take charge of their development so as to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions. Local accountability with regard to local economic development and the synergy with which stakeholders interact are success factors in eliciting the establishment of growth-generating projects.

CED sustains the growth and diversification of Quebec communities by supporting mobilization and joint action by the various stakeholders, planning of their economic development, solicitation, pursuit of funding, and implementation of structuring, recovery or diversification initiatives.

CED acts on the Mobilization of regions through its grants and contributions (G&C) program, the QEDP. It intervenes primarily through NPOs with an economic role, such as Community Economic Development Corporations (CEDCs).

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote61 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote62

4,734,000

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

6

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.2.1: Mobilization of regions

Communities take charge of their economic development

Percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization projectsFootnote63

10%Footnote64

33%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–14, CED awarded $3.2 million in the context of 26 funded projects under the Mobilization of regions sub-program.

Under the Mobilization of regions sub-program, CED supported the implementation of recovery and diversification plans and of projects stemming from those plans. Thus, of the 15 communities receiving financial support from CED in 2013–14 for projects aimed at their mobilization and development, five implemented projects arising from planning, i.e., 33% of the communities supported.

2.3.2 Sub-program 1.2.2 – Investment in the regions

Description

The Investment in the regions sub-program is aimed at increasing investment in the different regions of Quebec so as to strengthen their economic activity base. Quebec’s regions are faced with global competition, and have to stand out in order to attract the investment need to maximize their economic growth.Footnote65

Quebec has assets to be promoted, such as access to the North American market, a diversified economy, niches of excellence, skilled workers, an enviable quality of life, abundant resources, a differentiated tourism offering, and more besides.

CED supports regions in their efforts to acquire the equipment necessary to harness their assets in order to stimulate business and generate economic spinoffs. It also does so by enhancing promotion of regional assets with a view to increasing tourist spending and the attraction of foreign direct investment (FDI) through foreign corporations and international organizations.

CED intervenes in the Investment in the regions sub-program through its grants and contributions (G&C) program, the QEDP. In this regard, it focusses on NPOs, such as regional and sectoral tourism associations, organizations dedicated to attracting FDI and festivals.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote66 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote67

34,397,989

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

6

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.2.2: Investment in the regions

Quebec regions attract investment

Percentage of communities supported which implement economic community facility projects

75%

100%

Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions

5.4M

6.6M

Number of international organizations and foreign firms maintained in, or attracted to, the regions supported

30

48

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2013–14, performance in the Investment in the regions sub-program exceeded expectations. CED contributed to the competitive positioning efforts of the different regions of Quebec, to help them become more attractive and open to the world. It funded 87 projects, to the tune of $32.9 million, in 2013–14 to stimulate different forms of investment in Quebec.

In this sub-program, CED supports, in particular, the planning and implementation of community economic facility projects. Thus, the five communities which received financial support from CED in 2013–14 for community economic facility projects carried out projects stemming from planning. That represents 100% of the communities supported.

CED also fostered the international outreach of Quebec’s regional and sectoral economic assets. It supported the commercialization of destinations or major events, such as festivals, to increase the number of tourists visiting and generate economic spinoffs within communities. According to the latest data from Tourisme Québec, an average of some 6.6 million tourists a year from outside Quebec visited the province’s different regions.Footnote68

Finally, the attraction of new investment, particularly direct foreign investment, remains a priority for the Government of Canada.Footnote69 CED contributed to maintaining in or attracting to Quebec 48 foreign firms and international organizations in 2013–14.Footnote70

2.4 Program 1.3 – Strengthening of Community Economies

Strategic Outcome 1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.3
STRENGTHENING OF COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

Sub-program 1.3.1
COMMUNITY FUTURES PROGRAM

Sub-program 1.3.2
MODERNIZATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE

Sub-program 1.3.3
AD-HOC TARGETED SUPPORT

Description

CED designs, administers and implements Canada-wide programs or targeted ad-hoc initiatives. The goal of all these programs and initiatives is Strengthening of Community Economies in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

CED thus supports communities’ economic development and ensures sound, effective management of programs devoted to infrastructure for Quebec. It also supports economic activity in Quebec communities sustaining economic shocks, experiencing significant development challenges or grasping long-term business opportunities.

CED can act on Strengthening of Community Economies through dedicated temporary additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds allocated, intervening via its regular G&C program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

CED can also contribute through a permanent budgetary envelope dedicated to the Community Futures Program (CFP), where it intervenes via Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

Program Financial Resources,Footnote71 2013–14 (dollars)

Main Estimates

Planned Spending

Authorities

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

48,271,536

48,271,536

99,103,811Footnote72

64,286,545

16,015,009

Program Human ResourcesFootnote73 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

30

52

22

Program Performance Results, 2013–14

Program 1.3: Strengthening of Community Economies

Overall Results

Performance

Number of projects supportedFootnote74

Number of Canada-wide programs and ad-hoc initiatives implementedFootnote75

Actual spending

Share of CED’s actual spending

385 projects

8

$60 million

26.6 %

Expected Final Results (measurable after 3 years)

Performance Indicators

Targets

Results
(2013–14)

Quebec communities have stronger economies

Value of total investment generated in communities

Community Futures Program
(Target: 2014–15)

744M$

481.9M$Footnote76

Building Canada Fund and Municipal Rural Infrastructure FundFootnote77

N/A

N/A

Community Infrastructure Improvement FundFootnote78 (Target: 2013–14)

60M$

66.9M$Footnote79

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

On the strength of the performance obtained in 2013–14 under the Strengthening of Community Economies program, CED considers that it is on track to attain its results targets as of March 31, 2015. In all, CED designed two new initiativesFootnote80 in 2013–14, implemented a Canada-wide initiative,Footnote81 administered two funds for Infrastructure Canada, and continued delivering two other temporary G&C initiatives in Quebec communities.

CED’s intervention to strengthen community economies during 2013–14 generated investment totalling $301.9 million.Footnote82 The Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund ad-hoc initiative ended March 31, 2014, and met expectations with regard to the target.

Through the renewal of the Canada-wide EDI, CED contributed to stimulating the economic development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) in Quebec. This financial assistance is in line with the efforts invested under the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013 and continues to reflect the commitments that stem from Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Under the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, CED helped support the economic transition of communities in the Des Appalaches et Des Sources regional county municipalities (RCMs) that are dependent on the chrysotile asbestos industry toward the secondary and tertiary sectors.

Under the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, CED fosters that community’s economic and commercial recovery by deploying a dedicated team in the field to accompany local stakeholders in their economic development efforts.

2.4.1 Sub-program 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

Description

The Community Futures Program (CFP) sub-program is aimed at assisting local economic development in rural areas in order to strengthen the economies of Quebec communities. This sub-program is backed by the Canada-wide G&C program of the same name.

The CFP supports rural communities in their efforts to adjust continually to the economic situation. The rural communities’ economic performance is weaker than the Quebec average.Footnote83 By means of this sub-program, CED encourages Quebec rural communities’ planning and socio-economic development, access to capital, availability of consulting services and support for local projects.

CED delivers the CFP in Quebec through Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs), by means of contribution agreements.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote84 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote85

29,421,135

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

12

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.3.1: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Communities are economically sustainable

Number of economic development initiatives implemented in communities following support from CFDCs

315

549

Percentage of entrepreneurs undertaking pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise with support from CFDCs and BDCs

60%

66%

Percentage of enterprises carrying out recovery, expansion or modernization projects with support from CFDCs and BDCs

75%

78%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance obtained in the Community Futures Program sub-program met expectations in 2013–14. CED provided financial support to 56 CFDCs located in designated rural regions, as well as 10 BDCs in disadvantaged peri-urban areas. During FY 2013–14, CED paid some $28.5 million to those organizations under 71 contribution agreements.

Through CFDCs, CED achieved its results targets as of March 31, 2014. CFDCs implemented 549 economic development initiatives in communities, or more than the goal of 315 initiatives established on the basis of the 2011–12 (342 initiatives) and 2012–13 (290 initiatives) results. With the assistance of CFDCs and BDCs, 66% of the entrepreneurs supported carried out the pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise, while 78% of enterprises carried out their recovery, expansion or modernization projects.

The Summative Evaluation of the Business Startup and Succession Fund and the Business Support FundFootnote86 performed in 2013–14 presented positive results as to the impact of the assistance provided to enterprises by the CFDCs. With a total budget envelope of $28.3 million, the Funds led to the creation of 139 jobs and the maintenance of 685 jobs. Moreover, the sales figures of close to 75% of the enterprises sampled in the evaluation increased.

A study conducted by Statistics CanadaFootnote87 compared the performance of enterprises receiving support under the CFP with that of a group of similar enterprises that did not receive assistance. This study found that the CFP has a positive impact on the enterprises supported compared with the control group between 2005 and 2010. In fact, enterprises supported posted stronger performances with respect in particular to employment growth, survival rate, value of sales, and productivity.

2.4.2 Sub-program 1.3.2 – Modernization of infrastructure

Description

The Modernization of infrastructure sub-program is aimed at ensuring sound, effective management of infrastructure programs in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec’s communities. Public infrastructure is a key factor in economic development.

CED acts as Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for the administration in Quebec of the Building Canada Fund (BCF), Communities and Large Urban Centres components, and the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF).Footnote88

These grants and contributions programs are the subject of agreements between Infrastructure Canada and the Quebec government, and are aimed primarily at municipalities.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote89 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote90

316,556

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

4

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.3.2: Modernization of infrastructure

Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure

Number of communitiesFootnote91 with public infrastructure completed according to the terms of the contribution agreement

4

4Footnote92

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CED’s performance during 2013–14 in the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program met expectations. CED is the signatory, as a federal delivery partner, of a Service Level Agreement with Infrastructure Canada and the other regional development agencies to ensure delivery of the Communities and Large Urban Centres components of the Building Canada Fund. As such, CED is the special liaison with the Quebec government. Along similar lines, CED also handles delivery of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund program. In all, 185 projects were still active for these programs at the end of FY 2013–14.

Performance data come from the Quebec government. Regular follow-up is carried out with Quebec on the evolution of the program (commitments and evolution of projects), particularly at Canada-Quebec joint management committee meetings. The Quebec government has informed us that four communities have benefited from public infrastructure completed as of March 31, 2014. The data presented are based on projects completed under the Communities and Large Urban Centres components of the Building Canada Fund. All MRIF projects were completed in 2012–13.2012-2013.Footnote93

Performance highlights with respect to infrastructure programs may be found in Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Performance Reports.Footnote94

2.4.3 Sub-program 1.3.3 – Ad-hoc targeted support

Description

The Ad-hoc targeted support sub-program is aimed at providing ad-hoc support for Quebec communities’ economic activity in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies. The shifting context requires a real-time response that is geared to the most pressing local needs and consistent with specific governmental priorities.

CED is able to support Quebec communities facing economic shocks, natural disasters or situations that can have an adverse impact on their economic development, and that are facing serious economic development issues or are presented with development opportunities likely to have a positive impact on the regions.

The Ad-hoc targeted support sub-program is aimed primarily at enterprises and NPOs. CED intervenes in that regard through temporary additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds allocated by CED from its own budget.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Footnote95 2013–14 (dollars)

Planned Spending

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/AFootnote96

34,548,853

N/A

Sub-program Human Resources, 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

N/A

37

N/A

Sub-program Performance Results, 2013–14

Expected Results

Performance Indicators

Targets
(2013–14)

Results
(2013–14)

Sub-program 1.3.3: Ad-hoc targeted support

Communities have ad-hoc support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies

Percentage of communities supported receiving ad-hoc support:Footnote97

  • Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF)

85%

82%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For 2013–14, performance in the Ad-hoc targeted support sub-program met expectations. CED paid $31.5 million to support the implementation of 314 projects through four initiatives, two of them newly designed and one renewed during the year,Footnote98 to cater in real time to local needs and government priorities. In this way, it provided temporary support for economic activity in almost all the communities targeted in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies.

Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF)

As of March 31, 2014, CED had finalized delivery of the CIIF, a nationwide G&C program stemming from Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2012. Through the CIIF, CED supported the rehabilitation and improvement, including expansion, of existing community infrastructure.

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018

The communities supported under EDI 2013–2018 are Quebec’s official language minority communities (OLMCs).

Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic

2.5 Program 1.4 – Internal Services

Strategic Outcome 1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.4
INTERNAL SERVICES

No sub-program

  • Governance and management support
  • Ressource management services
  • Property management services

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to meet the needs of an organization’s programs and other general obligations. They include: management and monitoring services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; materiel services; acquisitions management services; and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources directed at the organization as a whole, and not those provided solely to a specific program. They lead to higher efficiency in program delivery, thus contributing to quality services for Canadians.

Program Financial Resources,Footnote99 2013–14 (dollars)

Main Estimates

Planned Spending

AuthoritiesFootnote100

Actual Spending

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

14,810,720

14,810,720

15,745,105

18,292,750

3,482,030

Program Human Resources,Footnote101 2013–14 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)

Planned Resources

Actual Resources

Difference
(Actual minus planned)

99

138

39

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

As mentioned in Section 1, the actual spending trend for the Internal Services program has been downward since 2011–12. In fact, the savings and efficiency measures introduced to date helped CED reduce spending for this program from $23 million in 2011–12 to around $18 million in 2013–14. CED is on track to attain its modernization and transformation goals, while meeting its commitments.

Actual FTE consumption in 2013–14 for the Internal Services program (138 FTEs) was higher than anticipated in the Report on Plans and Priorities for that fiscal year (99 FTEs). But it is important to note that planned FTEs in 2013–14 were underestimated in comparison to those planned for that program in 2014–15 (120 FTEs).

The variance observed between the forecast, which should have been approximately 120 FTEs, and actual resources of 138 FTEs is attributable in particular to CED’s desire to pursue and accelerate implementation of its transformation and modernization.

Following are some examples of initiatives pursued, terminated or subject to accelerated implementation in 2013–14:

Section III - Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Statements Highlights

The financial highlights presented below provide an overview of CED’s financial position and operations. The unaudited financial statements are drawn up in accordance with government accounting policies, which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Note that actual spending presented in the tables in Sections I and II of the Report were prepared on a cash basis, while the financial highlights that follow were prepared on an accrual basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to CED’s financial statements.

A more detailed statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on CED’s website.Footnote102

3.1.1 Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited) For the Year Ended March 31, 2014 (dollars)Footnoteviii

Financial Information

Planned Results
2013–2014

Actual Results
2013–2014

Actual Results
2012–2013

Difference (actual results 2013–2014 minus planned results 2013–2014)

Difference (actual results 2013–2014 minus actual results 2012–2013)

Total expensesFootnote103

187,643,000

184,836,195

224,220,083

(2,806,805)

(39,383,888)

Total revenues

0

0

0

0

0

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

187,643,000

184,836,195

224,220,083

(2,806,805)

(39,383,888)

Departmental net financial position

(3,181,000)

(2,364,305)

(2,750,846)

816,695

386,541

Expenses

Expenses

Graphic Long Description

Expenses are broken down into four items, as follows : (i) Business Development (35.7%), (ii) Regional Economic Development (21.3%), (iii) Strengthening Community Economies (32.0%), (iv) Internal Services (10.9%).

 

Revenues

3.1.2 Condensed Statement of Financial Position

Canada Economic Development for the Regions of Quebec
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2014 (dollars)
Financial Information

2013-2014

2012-2013

Difference
(2013–14 minus 2012–13)

Total net liabilities

33,572,155

57,377,940

(23,805,785)

Total net financial assets

30,396,774

53,580,994

(23,184,220)

Departmental net debt

3,175,381

3,796,946

(621,565)

Total non-financial assets

811,076

1,046,100

(235,024)

Departmental net financial position

(2,364,305)

(2,750,846)

386,541

Liabilities

Liabilities

Graphic Long Description

Liabilities are broken down into three items, as follows: (i) Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities (90.5%), (ii) Future Fringe Benefits (4.8%) and (iii) Vacation Pay and Compensatory Leave (4.6%).

 

Assets

Assets

Graphic Long Description

Assets are broken down into five items, as follows: (i) Amounts Due From the Consolidated Revenue Fund (96.1%), (ii) Loans Receivable (0.0%), (iii) Tangible Capital Assets(2.1%), (iv) Prepaid Expenses (0.5%) and (v) Amounts Receivable and Advances (1.3%).

 

3.2 Financial Statements

CED’s unaudited financial statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2014 and the Core Control Audit report produced by the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada along with the related Management Action Plan are available on CED's website.Footnoteix

3.3 Supplementary Information Tables

3.4 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures, such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in Tax Expenditures and Evaluations.Footnotex. The tax measures presented in that publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV : Organizational Contact Information

Canada Economic Development for the Regions of Quebec

Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec H3B 2T9
CANADA

Telephone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302

Website: Export Development Canada

 

Additional Information

The following information may be found on CED’s website:

Appendix - Definitions

Appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report:
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time Equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-Budgetary Expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance Indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance Reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned Spending:
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities:
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset Program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Whole-of-Government Framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

Footnote i

Whole-of-Government Framework

Return to footnote i referrer

Footnote ii

Public Accounts of Canada 2014

Return to footnote ii referrer

Footnote iii

Information on data sources, their processing and reliability is available in the supplementary tables on the CED website (See Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data)

Return to footnote iii referrer

Footnote iv

Statistics Canada (2013), Economic Impact Study – 2001 to 2010.

Return to footnote iv referrer

Footnote v

The Policy on Transfer Payments requires of departments and agencies that the administrative requirements imposed on recipients reflect the level of risk.

Return to footnote v referrer

Footnote vi

2012 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada: Chapter 2—Grant and Contribution Program Reforms

Return to footnote vi referrer

Footnote vii

Summative Evaluation of the Business Startup and Succession Fund and the Business Support Fund.

Return to footnote vii referrer

Footnote viii

Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) as at March 31, 2013 and 2014

Return to footnote viii referrer

Footnote ix

CED’s Financial Statements

Return to footnote ix referrer

Footnote x

Government of Canada Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

Return to footnote x referrer

Footnotes

Footnote 1

See the Justice Canada Website

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

To consult the text of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act, visit the Justice Laws Website

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The Economic Development Index consists of many variables, such as the participation rate, level of entrepreneurship, level of exporting establishments, value of building permits, diversification of the industrial structure, productivity, and more besides.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories (ETs).

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

To consult the list of the CED’s business offices, visit: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Visit CED’s website

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

CED contributes to the design, administration or implementation in Quebec of nationwide G&C programs and ad-hoc initiatives. For further details concerning these programs and initiatives, visit CED’s website and the supplementary tables on transfer payments.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

For further details on this program, visit the Infrastructure Canada website

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Note that a grants and contributions (G&C) program or a transfer payment program does not correspond to a program or sub program in the PAA.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Link to Government of Canada priorities.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Total number of projects approved corresponds to projects newly approved by CED during a given fiscal year.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

CED has identified 68 RCMs with slow economic growth, targeted on the basis of its Economic Development Index. For a list of these RCMs, visit: List of RCMs with slow economic growth

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Main Estimates are tabled in Parliament prior to the start of the fiscal year. Planned spending comprises the Main Estimates as well as additional authorities at the time of publication of the Report on Plans and Priorities. Total authorities correspond to total authorities as indicated in the Public Accounts for the year ending March 31, 2014. CED’s total actual spending corresponds to actual expenditures as indicated in the Public Accounts.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures. Internal services include only operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Main Estimates are tabled in Parliament prior to the start of the fiscal year. Planned spending comprises the Main Estimates as well as additional authorities at the time of publication of the Report on Plans and Priorities. Total authorities correspond to total authorities as indicated in the Public Accounts for the year ending March 31, 2014. CED’s total actual spending corresponds to actual expenditures as indicated in the Public Accounts.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Contribution repayments by clients are not included in planned spending for 2015–16 and 2016–17 since the authority has not been received at this stage.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Data on actual spending in 2011–12 are not available, because CED has had a new PAA since 2012–13.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

This amount includes the $35 million in additional funding for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. CED has taken steps to spread its spending over the next few years so as to be able to continue to meet the community’s needs.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

CED’s programs are the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) and the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

CED’s sunset programs between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2017 are, for example: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec's Forest Economies, Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, Initiative for International Cruise Development, Community Adjustment Fund, Recreational Infrastructure Canada Program, Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile and the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality initiative. Since the latter has become permanent, an adjustment will be made in the DPR 2014–15 so that it is no longer listed as a sunset program.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

Actual spending covers the period from 2011–12 to 2013–14.

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

Planned spending covers the period from 2014–15 to 2016–17.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Since figures are rounded, they may not add up to the total indicated.

Return to footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

Under the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, CED will continue to meet the community’s needs. It has thus taken the necessary steps to spread its spending over the next six years.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

See the Total Spending line in Figure 1 – Section 1.5.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

The total number of projects supported corresponds to projects for which expenditures were made by CED during a given period. The above result excludes projects associated with the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

The total number of projects approved corresponds to projects newly approved by CED during a given period. The above result excludes projects associated with the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

The leverage effect compares financial assistance approved by CED with funding from promoters and other sources. The above result excludes funding associated with the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

Not applicable. In line with CED's Performance Measurement Framework (PMF), performance indicators concerning the organization’s strategic outcome are monitored and measured every five years. These data will be available on April 1, 2017.

Return to footnote 30 referrer

Footnote 31

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories (ETs).

Return to footnote 31 referrer

Footnote 32

Indicator measured by the progression of the economic variables in CED’s Economic Development Index (e.g., participation rate, level of entrepreneurship and exporting establishments, value of building permits, productivity, etc.).

Return to footnote 32 referrer

Footnote 33

This involves CED’s efforts in connection with the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy. For further information on the Policy, please consult: The Agency and the Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy

Return to footnote 33 referrer

Footnote 34

CED, Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey, Montreal (2013).

Return to footnote 34 referrer

Footnote 35

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 35 referrer

Footnote 36

The breakdown of human resources by PAA program is estimated, and is presented as a guide only. The total number of planned FTEs is based on the available payroll and average salary for CED employees. FTEs are broken down in the PAA according to employee hours worked, by program.
As to human resources, CED’s actual consumption in 2013–14 was similar to 2012–13. This trend will be borne in mind in forecasting spending and consumption of FTEs.

Return to footnote 36 referrer

Footnote 37

The total number of projects supported corresponds to projects for which expenditures were made by CED during a given period.

Return to footnote 37 referrer

Footnote 38

This percentage excludes operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 38 referrer

Footnote 39

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.

Return to footnote 39 referrer

Footnote 40

The results target for this indicator was set at March 31, 2015. Pending measurement of results as of that date, CED presents the results for projects that were completed in 2010–11 for which no project end date was observed three years later, i.e., in 2013–14. The results are therefore annual.

Return to footnote 40 referrer

Footnote 41

No direct assistance was awarded for business succession and transfer projects, but CED supported enterprises in succession and transfer mode through its Enterprises’ performance sub-program.

Return to footnote 41 referrer

Footnote 42

Statistics Canada (2013), Economic Impact Study – 2001 to 2010.

Return to footnote 42 referrer

Footnote 43

Fondation de l’entrepreneurship (2014), Indice entrepreneurial québécois : Qu’est-ce qui motive nos jeunes à faire le grand saut? (Quebec’s entrepreneurial index: What motivates our young people to take the plunge?)

Return to footnote 43 referrer

Footnote 44

MDEIE (2010), Le renouvellement de l’entrepreneuriat au Québec : un regard sur 2013 et 2018 (Renewal of entrepreneurship in Quebec: A look at 2013 and 2018), Le renouvellement de l’entrepreneuriat au Québec : unregard sur 2013 et 2018

Return to footnote 44 referrer

Footnote 45

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 45 referrer

Footnote 46

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not report at the sub-program level. Information in that regard will be available in CED’s 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 46 referrer

Footnote 47

No direct assistance was awarded for business succession and transfer projects, but CED supported enterprises in succession and transfer mode through its Enterprises’ performance sub-program.

Return to footnote 47 referrer

Footnote 48

CIRANO, Productivité et travail (Productivity and labour): Le portail d'information sur l'économie du Québec d'aujourd'hui

Return to footnote 48 referrer

Footnote 49

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 49 referrer

Footnote 50

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not report at the sub-program level. Information in that regard will be available in CED’s 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 50 referrer

Footnote 51

With a view to improving the quality and reliability of performance data, the indicators on sales and self-generated revenue have been merged. CED made this correction in its Performance Management Framework 2014–15.

Return to footnote 51 referrer

Footnote 52

Statistics Canada (2013), Economic Impact Study – 2001 to 2010.

Return to footnote 52 referrer

Footnote 53

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 53 referrer

Footnote 54

The breakdown of human resources by PAA program is estimated, and is presented as a guide only. The total number of planned FTEs is based on the available payroll and average salary for CED employees. FTEs are broken down in the PAA according to employee hours worked, by program.
As to human resources, CED’s actual consumption in 2013–14 was similar to 2012–13. This trend will be borne in mind in forecasting spending and consumption of FTEs.

Return to footnote 54 referrer

Footnote 55

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.

Return to footnote 55 referrer

Footnote 56

The cumulative result for the target is $62 million. For FY 2013–14, the result attained was $52.4 million.

Return to footnote 56 referrer

Footnote 57

The cumulative result for the target is $6.7 million. For FY 2013–14, the most recent data provided by Tourisme Québec reveal that tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported spent $3.4 billion in 2012.

Return to footnote 57 referrer

Footnote 58

The cumulative result for the target is $2.5 billion. For FY 2013–14, the result attained was $1.65 billion.

Return to footnote 58 referrer

Footnote 59

Tourisme Québec (2013), Le tourisme au Québec en bref – 2012 (Tourism in Quebec in brief – 2012)

Return to footnote 59 referrer

Footnote 60

Montreal International (2013), 2013 Activity Report and Quebec International (2013), Annual Report 2013

Return to footnote 60 referrer

Footnote 61

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 61 referrer

Footnote 62

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not report at the sub-program level. Information in that regard will be available in CED’s 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 62 referrer

Footnote 63

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.

Return to footnote 63 referrer

Footnote 64

The methodology for calculating the 10% target in the RPP 2013–14 was adjusted in the RPP 2014–15 for more accurate measurement.

Return to footnote 64 referrer

Footnote 65

Centre sur la productivité et la prospérité (2010), Ouverture aux investissements directs étrangers et productivité au Canada (Openness to direct foreign investment and productivity in Canada), Montreal, HEC Montréal.

Return to footnote 65 referrer

Footnote 66

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 66 referrer

Footnote 67

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not report at the sub-program level. Information in that regard will be available in CED’s 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 67 referrer

Footnote 68

Tourisme Québec (2013), Le tourisme au Québec en bref (Tourism in Quebec in brief)

Return to footnote 68 referrer

Footnote 69

Government of Canada, Budget 2013.

Return to footnote 69 referrer

Footnote 70

Montreal International (2013), 2013 Activity Report and Quebec International (2013), Annual Report 2013.

Return to footnote 70 referrer

Footnote 71

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 71 referrer

Footnote 72

This amount includes the $35 million in additional funding for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. CED has taken steps to spread its spending over the next few years so as to be able to continue to meet the community’s needs.

Return to footnote 72 referrer

Footnote 73

The breakdown of human resources by PAA program is estimated, and is presented as a guide only. The total number of planned FTEs is based on the available payroll and average salary for CED employees. FTEs are broken down in the PAA according to employee hours worked, by program.
As to human resources, CED’s actual consumption in 2013–14 was similar to 2012–13. This trend will be borne in mind in forecasting spending and consumption of FTEs.

Return to footnote 73 referrer

Footnote 74

The above result excludes projects associated with the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 74 referrer

Footnote 75

The eight Canada-wide programs and ad-hoc initiatives implemented by CED are: Community Futures Program (CFP), Building Canada Fund–Quebec (BCF), Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF), Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF), Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI), Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, and Canada-Quebec Agreements to Support Sustainable Management of Quebec Forests.

Return to footnote 75 referrer

Footnote 76

The cumulative result for the target is $481.9 million. For FY 2013–14, the result attained was $255.2 million.

Return to footnote 76 referrer

Footnote 77

For these two programs, Infrastructure Canada reports directly to Parliament. For further details on results, see Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Performance Report.

Return to footnote 77 referrer

Footnote 78

This initiative terminated on March 31, 2014.

Return to footnote 78 referrer

Footnote 79

The cumulative result for the end of this initiative was $66.9 million. For FY 2013–14, the result attained was $43.2 million. The total value of investment generated in communities corresponds to the total cost of projects completed in 2013–14 (actual project end date).

Return to footnote 79 referrer

Footnote 80

The two new ad-hoc initiatives developed and delivered by CED in 2013–14 in Quebec were the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile and the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic. Also, the Montreal Planetarium project, which was to end in 2013–14, actually ended in 2012–13 for a final amount of $48 million.

Return to footnote 80 referrer

Footnote 81

Renewed Canada-wide initiative: Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013¬–2018.

Return to footnote 81 referrer

Footnote 82

The above result excludes projects associated with the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 82 referrer

Footnote 83

CED (2009), Evaluation of the Community Futures Program in Quebec – Final Report.

Return to footnote 83 referrer

Footnote 84

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 84 referrer

Footnote 85

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not report at the sub-program level. Information in that regard will be available in CED’s Departmental Performance Report for 2014–15.

Return to footnote 85 referrer

Footnote 86

Summative Evaluation of the Business Startup and Succession Fund and the Business Support Fund.

Return to footnote 86 referrer

Footnote 87

Statistics Canada’s third study on the CFP (2013).

Return to footnote 87 referrer

Footnote 88

CED is responsible for monitoring the use of funds for the federal government. It is also in charge of verifying project compliance with the standards of the Framework Agreements signed and with program terms and conditions.

Return to footnote 88 referrer

Footnote 89

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to footnote 89 referrer

Footnote 90

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not provide for reporting at the sub-program level. Financial and human resources variances will be available in CED’s Departmental Performance Report for 2014–15.

Return to footnote 90 referrer

Footnote 91

Under the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program, the geographical breakdown of Quebec differs from the rest of CED’s PAA, in order to facilitate its collaboration with the Quebec government. In this breakdown, the province comprises 17 administrative regions, which include municipalities, regional county municipalities, metropolitan communities and inter-municipal boards. The number of communities presented in the table is the aggregate of municipalities, regional county municipalities, metropolitan communities and inter-municipal boards in the 17 Quebec administrative regions which have public infrastructure completed according to the terms of the contribution agreement, as stated by the Quebec government.

Return to footnote 91 referrer

Footnote 92

Results are based on projects completed for the Building Canada Fund (BCF) (Communities and Large Urban Centres components) only. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) projects were completed in 2012–13.

Return to footnote 92 referrer

Footnote 93

For further details on the MRIF, visit the Infrastructure Canada website.

Return to footnote 93 referrer

Footnote 94

Visit the Infrastructure Canada website.

Return to footnote 94 referrer

Footnote 95

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 95 referrer

Footnote 96

CED’s Report on Plans and Priorities for 2013–14 did not provide for reporting at the sub-program level. Financial and human resources variances will be available in CED’s Departmental Performance Report for 2014–15.

Return to footnote 96 referrer

Footnote 97

For further details concerning the Canada-wide EDI initiative, the two ad-hoc initiatives and the CIIF, visit CED’s website.

Return to footnote 97 referrer

Footnote 98

The two new ad-hoc initiatives developed and delivered by CED in 2013–14 in Quebec were the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile and the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic.

Return to footnote 98 referrer

Footnote 99

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to footnote 99 referrer

Footnote 100

Parliamentary authorities are awarded by global vote. So authorities by Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) program are estimates, and are presented as a guide only.

Return to footnote 100 referrer

Footnote 101

The breakdown of human resources by PAA program is estimated, and is presented as a guide only. The total number of FTEs is based on the available payroll and average salary for CED employees. The planned FTEs in the Internal Services program are broken down according to the definition of internal services provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) in the Profile of Government of Canada Internal Services. However, as agreed with TBS, CED’s Management and Monitoring Services group, as with Canada’s other regional development agencies, excludes design and management of programs, policies, standards and guidelines, and government relations. The resources allocated to those services are therefore broken down among CED’s other programs and sub-programs. As to human resources, CED’s actual consumption in 2013–14 was similar to 2012–13. This trend will be borne in mind in forecasting spending and consumption of FTEs.

Return to footnote 101 referrer

Footnote 102

Visit CED’s website.

Return to footnote 102 referrer

Footnote 103

Expenses correspond to the economic resources used by CED during a period to deliver its PAA programs, and are of two types: (i) transfer payments; and (ii) operating expenses. Expenses calculated in the Financial Statements (Section III) differ from those appearing in sections I and II of the RPP, since unconditionally repayable contributions are not accounted for as loans, thus reducing total transfer payment expenses.

Return to footnote 103 referrer

 

 

Supplementary Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–2016, tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA, to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Economic Development Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this departmental strategy.

Accordingly, this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the results for commitments for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, Theme II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability, and Theme III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, within the context of the 2013–2016 FSDS. This DSDS also provides the results for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government based on the 2010–2013 FSDS.

2. Themes I–III: Department/Agency-led Targets

CED does not lead any FSDS targets.

3. Themes I–III: Implementation Strategies

The DSDS is implemented through CED’s regular grants and contributions (G&C) program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), through which CED supports the development of enterprises and regions.

As shown in the table below, CED’s intervention with respect to FSDS Theme I comes under the Business development program in the Program Activity Architecture (PAA). Implementation of greening of operations (Theme IV) is carried out under the Internal services program in the PAA.

Receipt

Processing

Communication

 

Quebec regions have a growing economy

Business development (1.1)

 

Internal services (1.4)

  • Support for entrepreneurship (1.1.1)
  • Enterprises’ performance (1.1.2)
 

Under Theme I, CED undertakes to fund projects that would, among other things, help to optimize resource use, enhance residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency. For instance, CED supports industrial greening projects (e.g., eco-design, eco-efficiency, green energy sources and eco-building) in order to help enterprises meet new requirements (e.g., eco-certification), identify pathways for enhancing environmental performance, and seize emerging (green) sector market opportunities.

Implementation Strategy and FSDS Targets

CED’s undertaking to “fund projects that would, among other things, help to optimize resource use, enhance residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency” ties in with FSDS Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality.

Fulfilment of this undertaking should contribute to the attainment of FSDS targets 1.1 (Climate Change Mitigation) and 2.1 (Air Pollutants). CED’s grants and contributions management system is geared to collecting information on projects that contribute to the attainment of these goals.

Activities Conducive to DSDS Implementation

In order to implement the DSDS, CED has conducted the following activities:

Information

Co-ordination and liaison

Reporting

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA)

Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA)

Communications

Program funding and delivery

Performance Summary for 2013-14

For 2013–14, CED aimed to maintain or increase the number of enterprise projects supported or the amount of expenditures compared with 2012–13. The performance indicators for each of the two sub-programs concerned were the following:

In 2013–14, CED directly supported 54 enterprises that were aiming to create and start up a business or enhance their performance in a sustainable development perspective, for expenditures amounting to $10.2M. In 2013–14, CED supported:

Compared with 2012–13, CED support for projects contributing to the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy held steady in 2013–14.

4. Theme IV: Implementation Strategies

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target
By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
(Target 8.6 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Existence of an implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE. Yes, Commodity Management Framework
Total number of departmental locations with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year. 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. CED’s Commodity Management Framework covers the life cycle of assets, in particular electronic and electrical equipment. All possible disposal methods are covered in the Framework.
  2. CED uses Industry Canada’s Computers for Schools program and PWGSC’s services for disposal of Crown assets to re-use surplus electronic equipment, and uses departmental individual standing offers for e-waste recycling.
  3. In 2013–14, CED had 12 business offices, a liaison office in Gatineau and its Head Office in Montreal. Disposal of assets and equipment was centralized at the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate.
  4. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: The plan for disposal of all electronic and electrical equipment was fully implemented in all CED locations in 2011–12.
Printing Unit Reduction Target
By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply the target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow.
(Target 8.7 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target Status Attention required
Ratio of printing units go departmental office employees in 2010–11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. (Optional) 1 : 3
Ratio of printing units go departmental office employees at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow 1 : 3

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope: CED targets all buildings and premises in order to achieve the targeted goal, although some buildings may have a smaller proportion owing to the building occupancy level or security considerations.
  2. Method used to determine the number of office employees: Population Affiliation ReportFootnote1 from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).
  3. Definition of printing unit: Network and local printers and multiplex units.
  4. Method used to determine the number of printing units: The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  5. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Printers are renewed in bulk every three years. The renewal planned for 2013–14 was deferred to 2014–15 owing to the unavailability of products yielding greater savings on acquisitions. In the meantime, defective printing units are neither replaced nor repaired, and the ratio of printing units to employees increases accordingly.
  6. The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  7. All CED sectors are responsible for compliance with and attainment of the target.
Paper Consumption Target
By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005–06 and 2011–12, and an applicable scope.
(Target 8.8 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Attention required
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the selected baseline year, according to the departmental scope. 5,060 sheets per office employee
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption per office employee in the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year.

Increase of 16%

5,878 sheets per office employee

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Roles and responsibilities: Purchasing of paper is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the target lies with all CED sectors. The Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring, information collection and reporting in this regard.
  2. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices. The data concern only white letter- and legal-sized paper.
  3. The number of employees used to establish the result is the average of the number of employees at the start and the end of the fiscal year.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, CED’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for Head Office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: The total volume of sheets of paper purchased by CED fell by 8.7% from the 2009-10 target year, whereas consumption per office employee rose. In fact, paper consumption largely reflects the volume of business conducted by CED, measured by the number of grants and contributions files processed. While the volume of business increased, CED’s workforce decreased significantly, in line with efforts under the DRAP. The net impact of this was the increase in per-employee paper consumption. Finally, since the Electronic Document Management (GCDOCS) initiative has not yet been fully implemented in all sectors, CED did not benefit from this measure as much as planned in terms of attaining its reduction goal.
  6. An awareness program will be drawn up and implemented, the plan to enhance green workplace practices will be updated, and CED will continue with the Electronic Document Management (GCDOCS) initiative to ensure lower paper consumption in line with the goals of the federal strategy.
Green Meetings Target
By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
(Target 8.9 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Adoption of a green meetings guide The Guide for Green Meetings was adopted in 2012–13.

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope of the Guide for Green Meetings: All departmental or interdepartmental meetings held in CED’s offices.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Work concerning the Guide was discussed at CED’s Departmental Management Committee (DMC) in 2011–12. CED thus put tools in place and published an iPad User Reference Guide and a Telepresence User Guide, components preliminary to the Guide for Green Meetings. The Guide for Green Meetings was approved in 2012–13.
  3. Role and responsibility: All sectors/directorates are responsible for attainment of the target.
  4. A communications strategy has been drawn up to make the means and tools in place for holding green meetings better known.
Green Procurement Targets
As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.
(Target 8.10 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
As of April 1, 2011, 95% of computer purchases will be based on an environmentally preferable model.
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Ratio of purchases of computers which attain the goal to the total volume of computers purchased during 2013–14. 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. According to the CED’s Technology Master Plan, renewal of all desktop computers takes place every three years, in a single purchase. The most recent renewal was carried out in 2011-12. The Agency combined its order with an order for computers from National Defence and the Canadian Forces, thus realizing savings in view of the volume purchased. Additional needs arise regularly, however, and ad-hoc purchases are made.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2013–14, 100% of computer purchases were based on an environmentally preferable model.
  3. CED’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for replacing desktop computers and reporting thereon. Note, however, that in future all such purchases will be made through Shared Services Canada (SSC), and that responsibility with respect to that goal will lie with SSC.
  4. When replacing electrical equipment, CED purchases Energy Star-certified products. This practice helps reduce energy consumption.
  5. In accordance with the Commodity Management Framework, the purchase of computer hardware is managed according to the principles of life cycle management, which involves the following four stages: planning and acquisition, operations, maintenance, and disposal.
  6. In accordance with the Commodity Management Framework, CED optimizes the productivity and use of IT assets throughout their life cycle.
By March 31, 2014, 95% of new printers purchased will offer one or more environmental performance factors.
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Exceeded
Proportion of printers purchased presenting environmental performance factors 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope: Printing units are defined as network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  2. CED’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place and is responsible for monitoring the target.
  3. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Printers will be renewed in 2014–15. A number of printers have been acquired for specific needs, and offer one or more environmental performance factors.
  4. More than 60% of photocopiers have print and fax functions, thus minimizing the number of units required.
  5. When replacing electrical equipment, CED purchases Energy Star-certified equipment.
By March 31, 2014, 90% of copy paper purchased will contain at least 30% recycled material.
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Percentage of paper purchased containing at least 30% recycled material compared with the total volume of paper purchased 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope: Paper is defined as 8.5 x 11, 8.5 x 14 and 11 x 17 paper.
  2. Roles and responsibilities: Purchasing of paper is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the target lies with all CED sectors. The Accounting, Collection and  Procurement Directorate handles monitoring, information collection and reporting in this regard.
  3. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, CED’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for Head Office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Since 2012–13, with 100% of copy paper purchased containing at least 30% recycled material, CED has exceeded its global goal of purchasing 90% recycled paper since March 2013.
  6. CED uses 100% recycled paper at its Head Office, while 100% of copy paper purchased for its business offices contains at least 30% recycled materials.
As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making. (Target 8.11 from 2010–2013 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy)
Training for select employees
From April 1, 2011, 100% of employees (Procurement Advisor and Procurement Officers) in the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will receive training on green procurement through Course C215 of the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS).
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Proportion of Procurement Sector employees having taken Canada School of Public Service (CSPS) Course 215. 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Training used: CSPS Course C215 on green procurement only.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: The two Procurement Sector employees concerned (PG-03 and PG-01) have taken Course C215, thus attaining the target.
  3. Reporting requirements: Annual data collection from employees and the CSPS.
  4. Roles and responsibilities: CED’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring of and reporting on green procurement training.
Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management
As of April 1, 2011, environmental considerations will be integrated into the performance evaluations of all CED employees in the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved
Percentage of CED’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees having in their performance agreements an environmental consideration goal for procurement 100%

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: The performance evaluations of the Procurement Sector employees concerned (one PG-01 and one PG-03) include environmental considerations.
Management processes and controls
By March 31, 2013, management processes and controls for procurement will ensure that environmental performance considerations are integrated in the procurement process.
Performance Measurement Performance Status
Target status Achieved

Number of processes revised in order to integrate environmental performance considerations, for the 2010–11 baseline year.

(Number of processes to be revised: 4)

4

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope: Currently, the four procurement processes are: the Commodity Management Framework, ISO procedure on procurement, request for proposals for drawing up a contract, and procedure for consulting and professional services.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: All processes have been revised to integrate good practices or enhance existing practices, in particular with regard to meeting reporting requirements. This target has been attained since 2012–13.

5. Additional CED Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to the enterprises supported under the Business development program, CED backed projects contributing to its DSDS under other sub-programs. CED also supported sustainable development projects carried out by non-profit organizations (NPOs).

Thus, taking into account all projects for which expenditures were made in 2013–14, 83 projects ($19.2M in expenditures) contributed to CED’s DSDS. This number includes projects carried out by NPOs providing services to enterprises and communities (19 projects, or $5.8M) and direct assistance (64 projects, or $13.3M).

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Responsibility for managing sustainable development is shared among different CED committees and sectors.

First, three committees are involved in sustainable development management, i.e., the Program Management Committee, the Internal Governance Committee and the Sustainable Development Committee.

Program Management Committee

The Program Management Committee is chaired by the Vice-President of the Policy and Communications Sector. Its mandate includes optimizing program performance and guiding CED in intervention analysis, performance measurement, and program evaluation. This committee also validates presentations made to it periodically within the course of the preparation of Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports, in which the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) is integrated.

Internal Governance Committee

The Internal Governance Committee is chaired by the Vice-President of CED’s Operations Sector. Its mandate is to guide the work, validate work plans, track internal governance activities with a broad scope of application to CED and facilitate their implementation. Since it is responsible for sustainable development, this committee ratifies the DSDS once a recommendation is issued by CED’s Sustainable Development Committee.

Sustainable Development Committee

The Sustainable Development Committee assists the Internal Governance Committee with respect to sustainable development, and comprises members from CED’s different branches involved in sustainable development-related activities. The committee takes part in drawing up and updating CED’s DSDS; its members promote the strategy in their respective settings and contribute to its implementation.

Three CED sectors also share responsibility for sustainable development, as described below.

Policy and Communications Sector

Within the Policy and Communications Sector, the Policy, Research and Programs Branch (PRPB) and the Communications Directorate have sustainable development responsibilities.

The PRPB:

The Communications Directorate:

Operations Sector

The Operations Sector is responsible for implementation of CED’s programs. It includes a network of business offices across Quebec, and contributes to the implementation of the DSDS.

More specifically, this sector:

Corporate Services Sector

The Corporate Services Sector:

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2013–14 report production cycle, CED took into account the environmental impact of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals in its decision-making process.

In 2012, CED conducted a strategic environmental assessment of the Quebec Economic Development ProgramFootnote2 and updated it in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012)Footnote3 and the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.Fotnote4 This assessment concluded that the program’s implementation was not likely to generate significant environmental effects, provided that CEAA 2012 is applied to supported projects so as to ensure that no significant environmental effects are generated.

No strategic environmental assessments were conducted in 2013–14.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Start date: April 1, 2012

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada’s Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008

Description: The Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) contributes to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by paying special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.

Results achieved: Through the QEDP, CED invested more than $197.4 million in 2013–14 in 1,073 projects in order to foster enterprises’ growth and build strong, competitive regions, and to implement national programs and initiatives in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

Through the Business development program in the PAA, CED supported the start-up of 125 enterprises in 2013–14. The majority (67%) of enterprises assisted with a view to enhancing their performance through increased productivity or promoting their expansion, innovation, commercialization, exports or partnerships maintained or increased their sales, thereby exceeding the targets.

Under the Regional economic development program in the PAA, CED contributes to building strong, competitive regions: 33% of communities were supported in 2013–14 in their mobilization efforts in order to increase their resilience in the face of volatile economic conditions. CED also aims to stimulate investment in the regions: 100% of communities supported implemented community economic facility projects, 6.6 million tourists from outside Quebec were attracted to the regions, and 48 international agencies or foreign firms were maintained in or attracted to the regions supported. These results are conclusive, and surpass expectations.

In 2013–14, CED is called upon to develop, administer and implement national programs or ad-hoc, targeted initiatives under its Strengthening of community economies program.Footnote5 CED invested a total of $60 million in 385 projects aimed at the recovery or diversification of the economies of Quebec communities struggling with targeted economic development issues. CED’s intervention for 2013–14 generated $301.9 million in total investment in Quebec communities.

Program ($ millions)
  2011-12
Actual Spending
2012-13
Actual Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
2013-14
Actual Spending
Variance
Grants 0 0.1 1.5 0 0 1.5
Contributions 0 203.7 181.0 231.9 197.4 (16.4)
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 203.8 182.5 231.9 197.4 (14.9)

Comments on variances: The $14.9-million difference between planned and actual spending is primarily attributable to:

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of the QEDP is planned in 2015-16.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Name of transfer payment program: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Start date: May 18, 1995

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada's Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Description: This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, including Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs).

Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.

Results achieved: CED provided financial support to 56 CFDCs located in designated rural regions and 10 BDCs in disadvantaged peri-urban areas. In 2013–14, some $28.5 million was paid to those agencies in order to support the implementation of 71 contribution agreements to strengthen the economies of Quebec’s rural communities.

CED also attained its results targets as of March 31, 2014. In fact, 549 economic development initiatives were implemented in communities in 2013–14 following support from CFDCs. With the assistance of CFDCs and BDCs, 66% of the entrepreneurs supported carried out the pre-startup, startup or acquisition of a business (target: 60%), while 78% of enterprises carried out their recovery, expansion or modernization projects (target: 75%).

Program ($ millions)
  2011-12
Actual Spending
2012-13
Actual Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Total Authorities
2013-14
Actual Spending
Variance
Grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions 28.5 28.6 29.0 29.0 28.5 0.5
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 28.5 28.5 29.0 29.0 28.5 0.5

Comments on variances: Non-significant variance.

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Table (2013-14)

Name of Internal Audit

Type of Internal Audit

Status

Completion Date

 

Financial resources management control activities

Achieved

October 2013

 

Transfer payment

Achieved

October 2013

 

Regional Development Agencies Audit of Receivables Management of Grants and Contributions Programs

Transfer payment

In progress

October 2014

 

Evaluations Table (2012-13)

Name of Evaluation

Program Activity

Status

Completion Date

 

Summative Evaluation of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF)

Strengthening of community economies

Achieved

August 2014

 

Evaluation of the Business Support Fund and the Business Startup and Succession Fund

Strengthening of community economies

In progress

2014-15

 

Evaluation of the Community Futures Program (CFP) in Quebec

Strengthening of community economies

In progress

2014-15

 

All CED evaluation reports are available on the Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions Agency website.

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

No recommendations were issued by any Parliamentary Committees concerning CED for 2013–14.

Response to the Auditor General of Canada, including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

No recommendations were received concerning CED following the tabling of the Report of the Auditor General of Canada and the Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development for 2013–14.Footnote6

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

For 2013–14, no audits of CED were conducted by the Public Service Commission of CanadaFootnote7 or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.Footnote8

User Fees Reporting

User fees: Fees may be charged under the Access to Information Act. Where applicable, other fees may also be charged for reproduction, research, preparation, production, programming and alternate format.

Fee type: Other products and services

Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act and Regulations

Date last modified: 1983

Performance standards: The person responsible in the organization is required to convey in whole or in part the documents requested, within 30 days following receipt of the access to information request. Pursuant to section 9 of the Act, the response time may be extended; notice of extension must then be sent. Further information on the Access to Information Act can be found on the Department of Justice site.

Performance results: In all, 69% of requests were answered within 30 days of their receipt. This situation is largely attributable to the nature of the documents requested, with extension of the deadline being necessary for consultation of third parties or other agencies. Taking into account the number of requests whose deadlines were extended for consultation, 81% of requests were answered within the timeframe set out in the Access to Information Act.

2013-14
($ thousands)
Planning Years
($ thousands)
Planned Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Planned Revenue Estimated Full Cost
150 435 114 000 2014-15 100 115 000
2015-16 100 117 000
2016-17 100 119 000

Other information: CED complies with Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines regarding the imposition of and exemption from access fees. For instance, it waives fees for amounts under $25. For higher sums it determines, based on the perceived public interest, whether it is appropriate to charge the full cost or not. In 2013–14, CED waived $420 in fees under the directive on the administration of the Access to Information Act.

Appendix 1 – Methodology and Technical Notes on Performance Data and Performance Status Rating

1. CED’s Performance Measurement Methodology

1.1 Tracking of projects

The tracking of CED-supported projects is carried out through a performance data collection system that has been in place since April 1, 2007. On April 1, 2012, a new Performance Management Framework (PMF) was implemented, reflecting CED’s new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its new regular program (QEDP). Since that date, project tracking has exhibited major improvements, in particular the reduction in the number of indicators, as well as efforts to simplify and automate the management information system (Hermès).

In the field of economic development, expected results are rarely observed during the year of the expenditure. Generally speaking, it is only after one or two years that the impact of an enterprise’s development activities on its sales is seen. The same is true for many activities supported through CED programs, whether in market development, technology transfer or enterprise creation.

To report on the implementation of organizational priorities, the use of funding awarded by CED in 2013–14 and intermediate and final results, three main baselines are used in this report:

Moreover, CED’s intervention takes place in two ways, through projects involving:

1.2 Performance data collection

1.2.1 Reliability of performance data

For DA projects, project results are tracked by business office advisors, as part of regular customer agreement follow-up activities. Generally speaking, the data come from enterprises’ financial statements, thus yielding a high level of reliability. Instructions for using and inputting indicators and appropriate quality controls ensure standardized input of data into the Hermès financial information system. In that regard, simplification and automation have reduced the time advisors devote to tracking the performance of each project, as well as enhancing the reliability of the results.

In the context of IG projects, CED has introduced a new data collection strategy in order to measure the impact of IGs’ intervention in relation to their recipients. This approach, which involves tracking IGs’ clientele directly, is based on obtaining a list of accompanied recipients so that CED can send them a survey. An initial introductory phase of this tracking strategy was carried out with respect to a group of organizations providing commercialization and export-oriented services. To date, the results obtained have been conclusive and yield more reliable information on the services offered to recipients. This procedure helps avoid a situation where an enterprise is counted twice, through direct assistance or through different intermediary groups. Note that this approach will be broadened to all IGs supported by CED in the years to come.

1.2.2 Attribution of results

CED works closely with several departments and agencies of the Government of Canada and the Quebec government, and with many local and regional stakeholders. This collaboration is reflected in the financial packages put together for projects. That is why CED cannot itself take credit or claim responsibility for all the results obtained. It is therefore fair to say that the financial assistance awarded by CED for the completion of projects contributes to attainment of the results observed.

2. Technical Notes on Performance Data

List of Acronyms:

BCF:

Building Canada Fund–Quebec

 

BDC:

Business Development Centre

 

CFDC:

Community Futures Development Corporation

 

CFP:

Community Futures Program

 

CIIF:

Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund

 

DA:

Direct intervention with enterprises

 

DPR:

Departmental Performance Report

 

EDI:

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative

 

ET:

Equivalent territory

 

IG:

Intervention through intermediary groups

 

MRIF:

Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

 

NPO:

Non-profit organization

 

ORPEX:

Regional export promotion organization

 

PAA:

Program Alignment Architecture

 

QEDP:

Quebec Economic Development Program

 

RCM:

Regional county municipality

 

RPP:

Report on Plans and Priorities

 

SME:

Small and medium-sized enterprise

 

Chrysotile:

Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

 

Infrastructure:

Infrastructure Canada Program

 

Mégantic:

Funding for the economic recovery of the town of Lac-Mégantic

 

2.1 Technical notes on Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) indicators

STRATEGIC OUTCOME – Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Indicator:

Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their gross domestic product

 

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017.

 

Result attained:

N/A

 

Data source:

Institut de la statistique du Québec

 

Methodology:

Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their gross domestic product between 2012 and 2017.

 

Note:

There are a total of 17 administrative regions in Quebec.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Indicator:

Percentage of Quebec RCMs and ETs having improved their economic performance

 

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017.

 

Result attained:

N/A

 

Data source:

Statistics Canada, Institut de la statistique du Québec, Conference Board of Canada and United States Patent and Trademark Office

 

Methodology:

Number of Quebec RCMs and ETs having improved their economic performance with regard to the main economic variables in CED’s economic development index (participation rate, value of building permits, level of entrepreneurship, productivity, level of exporting establishments, number of patents, and diversification) out of the total number of RCMs/ETs, expressed as a percentage, between 2012 and 2017.

 

Note:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ETs in Quebec.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

PROGRAM 1.1 – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

FINAL RESULT – The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed.

Indicator:

Survival rate of enterprises receiving startup support

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

86% (30/35 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and startup projects whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) in 2010–11 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., in 2013–14, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business creation and startup projects whose projects were completed in 2010–11, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6)  corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate. Furthermore, an enterprise is deemed to have started up when it meets the following two conditions: it has been in operation for at least one year, and it generates revenues equivalent to at least 80% of its expenditures.

 

Change:

Calculation of this indicator has been automated. The definition of an enterprise “having ceased its activities” was improved in the process. As well as generating efficiencies, this automation helped enhance the reliability of results by eliminating numerous manipulations and ensuring consistent processing from year to year.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Survival rate of enterprises receiving transfer support

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

No result

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business succession and transfer projects whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) in 2010–11 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., in 2013–14, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business succession and transfer projects whose projects were completed in 2010–11, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6)  corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Indicator:

Survival rate of enterprises receiving startup support

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

97% (270/278 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Enterprises’ performance projects(Productivity and expansion, Innovation and Technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) in 2010–11 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., in 2013–14, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Enterprises’ performance projects(Productivity and expansion, Innovation and Technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) whose projects were completed in 2010–11, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

 

Change:

Calculation of this indicator has been automated. The definition of an enterprise “having ceased its activities” was improved in the process. As well as generating efficiencies, this automation helped enhance the reliability of results by eliminating numerous manipulations and ensuring consistent processing from year to year.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.1 – Support for entrepreneurship

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Enterprises are started up or transferred

Indicator:

Number of enterprises started up

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

125 (16 in DA and 109 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and startup projects which attained the status of startup enterprise in calendar 2013 out of enterprises whose Business creation and startup projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2009-10 and 2013–14. This number excludes enterprises having obtained the status of startup enterprise in a year prior to 2013. Added to this is the number of enterprises having attained the status of startup enterprise in 2013–14 following a service from an IG received in 2012–13.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 26% of data missing (30/116) since many enterprises had not yet published their 2013 financial statements as of early June 2014. As enterprises’ performance is independent of their fiscal year end date, no bias is introduced as a result of the lack of data.

IG: High, on the basis of information in files, as provided by IGs

 

Indicator:

Number of enterprises transferred

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

No result

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business succession and transfer projects which attained the status of transferred enterprise in calendar 2013 out of enterprises whose Business succession and transfer projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2009-10 and 2013–14. This number excludes enterprises having obtained the status of transferred enterprise in a year prior to 2013.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to support entrepreneurship

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

116

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Support for entrepreneurship projects (Business creation and startup and Business succession and transfer) with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded in order to support entrepreneurship

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$18,365,893

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Support for entrepreneurship projects (Business creation and startup and Business succession and transfer) in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.2 – Enterprises’ performance

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Enterprises improve their performance.

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their sales

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

67% (96/144 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or their self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2013, among enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer and Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2010–11 and 2012–13, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by this pool, expressed as a percentage. The increase in sales or self-generated revenue is observable one year but not more than two years after their actual project end date in relation to the fiscal year end of the most recent financial statements at the start of the project.

 

Reliability of result:

High; 44% of data missing (114/258) since many enterprises had not yet published their 2013 financial statements as of early June 2014. As enterprises’ performance is independent of their fiscal year end date, no bias is introduced as a result of the lack of data.

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to enhance the performance of existing enterprises

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

536

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Enterprises’ performance projects (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) with expenditures in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded in order to enhance the performance of existing enterprises

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$111,357,620

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Enterprises’ performance projects (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

PROGRAM 1.2 – REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

FINAL RESULT – Quebec’s regions have a stronger economic base.

Indicator:

Amount of total investment generated in regions supported that have completed implementation of their development project

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$52,397,292

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Sum of total costs of all Development strategies and Community economic facilities projects for which expenditures were made in 2013–14

 

Change:

A methodological change in the target will be introduced in the RPP 2015-16 in order to reflect more closely the chain of results from the Quebec Economic Development Program. The indicator will then correspond to the sum of total costs of Development strategies and Community economic facilities implementation projects that will have been completed (actual project termination date) during the fiscal year covered by the DPR.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$3.4 billion

 

Data source:

Tourisme Québec

 

Methodology:

Most recent annual amount released by Tourisme Québec of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e., the sum of spending by tourists from other provinces, spending by tourists from the United States and spending by tourists from other countries.

 

Note:

The timeframe for Tourisme Québec’s data releases is more than one year. For instance, data for 2012 were released in April 2014.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Amount of direct foreign investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$1.65 billion

 

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the agencies supported

 

Methodology:

Total annual foreign direct investment amounts maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by agencies having received financial assistance in 2013–14 for Promotion of regional assets projects (i.e., with expenditures in 2013–14).

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.1 – Mobilization of regions

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities take charge of their economic development.

Indicator:

Percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization projects

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

33%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Development strategies projects in 2013–14 out of the total number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2013–14 for Development strategies projects (sum of planning and implementation projects), expressed as a percentage.

 

Change:

The methodology for calculating the target for the RPP 2013–14 was adjusted in the RPP 2014–15 with a view to more accurate measurement. The result in the DPR 2013–14 was calculated using that methodology, as defined above. The 10% target in the RPP 2013–14 had been established by considering the number of individual communities implementing Development strategies projects out of all Quebec’s 104 RCMs/ETs.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to mobilize the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

26

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Mobilization of regions (Development strategies) projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded in order to mobilize the regions

 

Result attained:

$3,267,570

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of Mobilization of regions (Development strategies) project expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.2 – Investment in the regions

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Quebec regions attract investment.

Indicator:

Percentage of communities supported which implement community economic facility projects

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

100%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Community economic facilities projects in 2013–14 out of the total number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2013–14 for Community economic facilities projects (total of planning and implementation projects), expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

6.6 million

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Most recent annual data released by Tourisme Québec concerning the number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e., the sum of tourists from other provinces, the United States and other countries. These data are limited to the number of tourists, and do not include daytrippers.

 

Note:

The timeframe for Tourisme Québec’s data releases is more than one year. For instance, data for 2012 were released in April 2014.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained in or attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

48

 

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the agencies supported

 

Methodology:

Total number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by the agencies having received financial assistance (i.e., with expenditures) in 2013–14 for Promotion of regional assets projects.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to attract investment to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

87

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Investment in the regions projects (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded in order to attract investment to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$32,931,159

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Investment in the regions projects (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

PROGRAM 1.3 – STRENGTHENING OF COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

FINAL RESULT – Quebec communities have stronger economies.

Indicator:

Dollar amount of total investment generated in communities, by program and initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

CFP: $263,750,438
Infrastructure: N/A
CIIF: $43,158,329
EDI: $3,032,608
Chrysotile: $0 (no projects completed in 2013–14)
Mégantic: $535,455

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

For the CFP, the sum of total costs of projects of enterprises supported by CFDCs and BDCs completed in 2013–14. For the other initiatives, the sum of total costs of projects by program and initiative that were completed (actual project end date) in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities are economically sustainable.

Indicator:

Number of economic development initiatives implemented in communities following support from CFDCs

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

537

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of economic development projects supported by CFDCs, under the CFP, in 2013–14. These data do not include BDCs.

 

Reliability of result:

High, on the basis of information provided by the CFDCs.

 

Indicator:

Percentage of entrepreneurs undertaking pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise with support from CFDCs and BDCs.

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

66%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of number of enterprises having drawn up a business plan, number of enterprises created and number of enterprises acquired out of the number of enterprises having received personalized coaching services with respect to pre-startup, startup or acquisition of enterprises from CFDCs and BDCs in 2013–14, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

High

 

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises carrying out recovery, expansion or modernization projects with support from CFDCs and BDCs

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

78%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises recovered, modernized or expanding out of the number of enterprises undergoing recovery, expansion or modernization having received coaching services from CFDCs and BDCs in 2013–14, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

High

 

Output:

Number of projects funded by CFDCs and BDCs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

1,635

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of number of enterprises having received personalized coaching services with respect to pre-startup, startup or acquisition of enterprises and number of enterprises undergoing recovery, expansion or modernization having received coaching services from CFDCs and BDCs in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

High

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded to CFDCs and BDCs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$28.5M

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for CFDC and BDC projects in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.2 – Modernization of infrastructure

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure.

Indicator:

Number of communities with public infrastructure completed according to contribution agreement terms

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

4

 

Data source:

Internal Audit of Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure (SIMSI), developed by Infrastructure Canada

 

Methodology:

Results are based on projects completed for the Building Canada Fund (BCF)–Communities Component and Large Urban Centres Component only. Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) projects were completed in 2012–13.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.3 – Targeted ad-hoc support

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities have ad-hoc support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies

Indicator:

Percentage of communities supported receiving ad-hoc support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

CIIF: 82%
EDI: 15% (9/62 X 100)
Chrysotile: 100%
Mégantic: 100% 

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

For the EDI, number of individual official language minority communities (OLMCs) supported directly (DA) and indirectly (IG) in 2013–14 out of the number of communities targeted by the EDI, expressed as a percentage. For the other initiatives, number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2013–14 out of the number of communities targeted by the initiative, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

Communities targeted under EDI 2013–2018 are OLMCs, i.e., those whose English-speaking population is at least 500 for NPO projects and whose proportion of Anglophones reaches at least 5% outside Greater Montreal for SME projects. The number of communities targeted by the EDI is 62 RCMs or ETs.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded for communities to have ad-hoc support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

CIIF: 294
EDI: 6
Chrysotile: 5
Mégantic: 3

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects by initiative with expenditures in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total dollar amount of G&C awarded for communities to have ad-hoc support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

CIIF: $28,429,335
EDI: $1,409,282
Chrysotile: $515,656
Mégantic: $583,885

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of project expenditures per initiative in 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

2.1 Technical notes on other performance data

2.2.1 Additional data with respect to strategic outcome

Data:

Total number of projects supported in 2013–14 (excluding Modernization of infrastructure SP)

 

Value:

1,150

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total number of projects approved in 2013–14 (excluding Modernization of infrastructure SP)

 

Value:

646

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects approved in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total actual expenditures in 2013–14

 

Value:

$225,935,280

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total leverage effect in 2013–14 (excluding Modernization of infrastructure SP)

 

Value:

2.62

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Leverage effect corresponds to the difference between Total cost of projects with expenditures in 2013–14 and Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2013–14 divided by Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2013–14.

 

Note:

Since project durations and start dates vary, the leverage effect accounts for sums spread over several years, before, during or after 2013–14.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Value of multi-year financial assistance approved by CED in 2013–14

 

Value:

$187,320,623

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of Authorized assistance for projects approvedin 2013–14; no processing

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Value of total investment generated in 2013–14

 

Value:

$926,711,134

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of Total costs of projects approved in 2013–14; no processing

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

7,391 (505 in DA and 6,886 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises (including asset-operating NPOs under Enterprises’ performance) having received financial support from CED on the basis of direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of individual communities having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

104 (99 in DA and 104 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities having received financial support from CED on the basis of direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Note:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ETs in Quebec (one RCM/ET = one community).

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 
2.2.2 Additional data with respect to Enterprises’ performance sub-program

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support under the Enterprises’ performance sub-program (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

4,520 (413 in DA and 4,107 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Enterprises’ performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in their Productivity and expansion project (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

540 (277 in DA and 263 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Productivity and expansion direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Innovation and technology transfer (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

820 (35 in DA and 785 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Innovation and technology transfer direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Commercialization and exports (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

2,817 (100 in DA and 2,717 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Commercialization and exports direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Structuring of networks (direct/indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

343 (All in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Structuring of networks direct assistance and intermediary group projects with expenditures in 2013–14

 

Reliability of result:

IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of newly exporting enterprises (indirect, in 2013–14)

 

Value:

319

 

Data source:

IG activity reports and survey of IG clients

 

Methodology:

Number of newly exporting enterprises in 2013–14 (survey of ORPEXs) following a Commercialization and exports service from an IG received in 2012–13 (ORPEX activity report).

 

Reliability of result:

IG: High, on the basis of an online survey of ORPEX clients for which the response rate was 15% (as of June 18, 2014), a good rate for an online poll.

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Productivity and expansion having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

71% (66/93 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or their self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2013, among enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2010–11 and 2012–13 out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage. The increase in sales or self-generated revenue is observable one year but not more than two years after their actual project end date in relation to the fiscal year end of the most recent financial statements at the start of the project.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 43% of data missing (70/163) since many enterprises had not yet published their 2013 financial statements as of early June 2014. As enterprises’ performance is independent of their fiscal year end date, no bias is introduced as a result of the lack of data.

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Innovation and technology transfer having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

50% (10/20 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or their self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2013, among enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Innovation and technology transfer projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2010–11 and 2012–13 out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage. The increase in sales or self-generated revenue is observable one year but not more than two years after their actual project end date in relation to the fiscal year end of the most recent financial statements at the start of the project.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 47% of data missing (18/38) since many enterprises had not yet published their 2013 financial statements as of early June 2014. As enterprises’ performance is independent of their fiscal year end date, no bias is introduced as a result of the lack of data.

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to exports and commercialization having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

68% (14/24 X 100)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or their self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2013, among enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2010–11 and 2012–13 out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage. The increase in sales or self-generated revenue is observable one year but not more than two years after their actual project end date in relation to the fiscal year end of the most recent financial statements at the start of the project.

 

Reliability of result:

High; 46% of data missing (26/57) since many enterprises had not yet published their 2013 financial statements as of early June 2014. As enterprises’ performance is independent of their fiscal year end date, no bias is introduced as a result of the lack of data.

 
2.2.3 Additional data with respect to Mobilization of regions sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.1.2 Mobilization of regions

 

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the Mobilization of regions sub-program in 2013–14

 

Result attained:

15

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2013–14 for Development strategies projects (total of planning and implementation projects)

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Population Affiliation Report.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

Refer to CED’s website.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

Refer to the Justice Canada website.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

Refer to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency website.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

The Strengthening of community economies program in the PAA excludes the following transfer payment programs: the Community Futures Program (CFP), and the Modernization of infrastructure sub-program.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Reports to Parliament

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

Audit reports 2012-2013

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Audits

Return to footnote 8 referrer

 

Date modified: