2017–18 Departmental Plan

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About this publication

ISSN number : 2371-8277

Catalog number : Iu90-1/15E-PDF

Publish date : March 9, 2017

Summary : Read through this departmental plan, which presents the Agency's priorities and expected results in 2017-18.

Table of Contents

  1. Minister's Message
  2. Institutional Head’s message
  3. Plans at a glance
  4. Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do
  5. Operating context: conditions affecting our work
  6. Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results
  7. Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond
  8. Spending and human resources
  9. Supplementary information
  10. Appendix A - Definitions
  11. Supplementary Tables

Minister's Message

Our 2017–18 Departmental Plan provides parliamentarians and Canadians with information on what we do and the results we are trying to achieve during the upcoming year. To improve reporting to Canadians, we are introducing a new, simplified report to replace the Report on Plans and Priorities.

The title of the report has been changed to reflect its purpose: to communicate our annual performance goals and the financial and human resources forecast to deliver those results. The report has also been restructured to tell a clearer, more straightforward and balanced story of the actual results we are trying to achieve, while continuing to provide transparency on how tax payers’ dollars will be spent. We describe our programs and services for Canadians, our priorities for 2017–18, and how our work will fulfill our departmental mandate commitments and the government’s priorities.

Through the programs of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio, we are working together to deliver Canada’s Innovation Agenda—a whole-of-government initiative to position Canada as a global centre for innovation, create better jobs and opportunities for the middle class, drive growth across all industries and improve the living standards of all Canadians. The work of the Portfolio also includes commercializing more research and ideas; providing more Canadians with the skills to participate in a global and digital economy; helping small businesses grow through innovation, access to capital and trade; promoting increased tourism to Canada; and supporting scientific research and the integration of scientific considerations in our investment and policy choices.

It is my pleasure to present the Departmental Plan for Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec for 2017–18.

L'honorable Navdeep Bains

The Honorable Navdeep Bains

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Institutional Head’s message

Institutional Head, Manon BrassardI am proud to present the Departmental Plan 2017–18 for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED). The Plan sets out the main levers CED will use to accompany Quebec regions toward the economy of tomorrow – a more innovative, green and inclusive economy.

CED will pursue its collaboration and dialogue undertaken in 2016 with all regional development stakeholders to better help Quebec regions address the challenges they face and provide them with programs that meet their needs and make a real difference on the ground.

Through its business offices and its Industrial and Technological Benefits team, CED will continue to stimulate the economic development of Quebec regions. We will help communities to showcase their economic assets, diversify, and strengthen and develop their growth potential, building on the vitality of their businesses and non-profit organizations.

In 2015–16, our clients expressed their satisfaction with 94% of our programs. We will pursue our modernization efforts to continue to provide relevant, quality programs, using a results-based, inclusive and streamlined approach.

CED plays a unique role in Quebec. Its regional focus and distinctive service offer and the tangible scope of its activities make it a key player in achieving the objectives of the Government of Canada.

Sincerely

Manon Brassard

Deputy Minister / President of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Plans at a glance

The priorities presented below represent the areas that CED has chosen to focus on in fiscal 2017–18 through the programs in its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). They are aligned with the ideas shared by over 1,000 members of the public, regional economic development stakeholders and CED employees who participated in the Engagement StrategyFootnote i activity carried out by CED in 2016. The goal of the activity was to inform CED’s strategy for the coming years. They will also contribute to the Government of Canada’s Innovation AgendaFootnote ii, which focuses on people, technology and businesses.

CED’s priorities are as follows:

In addition to its regional economic development priorities, CED plans to pursue its internal services and program delivery modernization efforts, notably through its participation in developing a new common grants and contributions management system, the development and implementation of its Departmental Workplace Well-Being Strategy, including mental health, and its innovation and experimentation activities, which could account for up to 2% of its operating budget for fiscal year 2017–18.

CED pays special attention to communities with low economic growth potential. It has an economic development index that can be used to determine the level of economic development of Quebec’s 104 communities that helps it properly meet needs and better target its actions.

CED develops regional action strategies for achieving its mandate and priorities at its business offices, while ensuring accessibility and a federal presence in the regions. Using these regional strategies, the Agency tailors its actions to the context, the specific needs and the particular issues facing the various regions of Quebec.

For more information on CED’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Highlights

Highlights

CED will coordinate the Accelerated Growth Service pilot project in Quebec with its federal partners in order to respond to the government’s national priorities and encourage the growth of high-impact firms, thereby helping them to be more competitive internationally.

CED will contribute to the government’s commitments to combat climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through $25 million in spending on clean technology projects being carried out by businesses and organizations in 2017–18.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

Pursuant to its enabling legislationFootnote iii, the mandate of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate”.

Mandate and role

CED is part of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio, which is comprised of 17 departments and agencies, including the RDAs (such as CED) and other federal agencies, such as the National Research Council (NRC) and the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC). Their mandate is to “further the government’s goal of building a knowledge-based economy in all regions of Canada and to advance the government’s jobs and growth agenda.”

CED is the key economic development player for Quebec’s regions for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). As part of its mission, CED fosters business start-ups and growth. It helps them become more innovative, productive and competitive. It supports efforts to engage the regions of Quebec and attract investments that will help boost the economic well-being of Quebec and Canada.

CED contributes to the economic vitality of all of Quebec’s regions by leveraging their competitive regional advantages, such as wind power and marine technologies. It also supports the transition and diversification of communities that remain dependent on a limited number of sectors or that have been affected by an economic shock, such as the closure of the chrysotile mines.

CED achieves its results by supporting businesses, primarily SMEs, and non-profit organizations (NPOs), through strategic investments. Through its 12 business offices across Quebec’s regions, its engagement strategy and the relationships it has developed with other economic development players, CED stays abreast of the needs of the regions and businesses and is able to offer financial support to carry out projects that support businesses and communities in their economic development efforts.

CED’s Grants and Contributions Programs and Initiatives, in effect during 2017–18Footnote iv Footnote v

Main Program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)Footnote vi

National program implemented in Quebec by CED:

  • Community Futures Program (CFP)

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

Operating context: conditions affecting our work

CED is maintaining an ongoing analysis of its evolving operating context, so as to identify and act on emerging challenges and new opportunities with a substantial influence on its regional economic development activities.

External environment

CED operates in a context of modest world economic growth where global risks are interdependent. This context is characterized by the fluctuating value of raw materials and the Canadian dollar, strong global competition in some sectors, numerous technological and political changes, and measures affecting trade on global markets. These factors will have an impact on the manufacturing sector and exports of Quebec enterprises. The regions of Quebec that have a single industry economy or one that is highly concentrated in sectors influenced by these factors will have to redouble their efforts to strengthen and diversify their economic base.

The entrepreneurial context in Quebec is marked by challenges for innovation and the commercialization of research and development, and by the transformation of the support structure for regional economic development and businesses. These challenges are encouraging economic development stakeholders in Quebec to pursue their adjustment efforts and to strengthen collaboration to ensure consistent actions in the regions.

Internal environment

CED will have to meet the challenge of attracting and retaining qualified and specialized employees in order to meet specific needs and priorities.

CED is implementing a number of government-wide initiatives, such as the replacement of the financial management system, the Treasury Board Secretariat’s policy reset, and data centre consolidation, in line with the Government of Canada’s renewal, modernization and innovation vision for the public service. Over the coming year, the simultaneous implementation of all these initiatives, the transformation of CED’s business processes and the relocation of its head office will create significant financial pressures and represent a challenge for realization.

Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results

Risk 1: Maintaining a functional and secure technology infrastructure

The internal risk presented in the table below, which is related to the maintenance of functional and safe technological infrastructure, is designated as being the most likely to affect CED’s ability to achieve its results in this reporting period.

Indeed, current CED technology infrastructure is aging. The risks of service failures or data loss are high pending infrastructure renewal or migration to a new data center. Required to relocate its head office at the beginning of the 2018-2019 fiscal year, CED faces a challenge, out of its control to maintain its technology infrastructure while waiting for the technology solution to be chosen by its technology infrastructure service provider. Service failures or data losses could harm CED’s operations and adversely affect the quality of client services.

To mitigate the possibility of service failures and data losses, in addition to redoubling its security efforts, CED will have to perform an analysis and prepare options for maintaining and renewing its technology assets and meeting technology infrastructure, as well as information management system needs. This will facilitate informed decision making concerning the best option to be implemented in order to manage risk, based on CED’s resources.

CED will continue to measure the effectiveness of its risk mitigation strategy to meet technology infrastructure, as well as information management system needs to alert Shared Services Canada in a timely fashion.

Risk 2: Ability to adapt the delivery of its mandate in a changing economic environment

A number of external factors, as described in the previous section, are likely to have an impact on the delivery of the organization’s mandate, making it more difficult to create new businesses, expand existing businesses, and by reducing the number of entrepreneurs.

CED is developing a risk mitigation strategy aimed at tailoring the delivery of its mandate in response to the external environment, and achieving the expected outcomes, specifically as it concerns export and manufacturing sector projects.

Under this risk mitigation strategy, CED will implement and communicate its main strategic directions, which incorporate the Government of Canada’s priorities and the commitments in the mandate letter to the ministers of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development portfolio. CED will also continue to engage in dialogue with stakeholders and the public. Such dialogue has been taking place on a more regular basis since the implementation of the CED Engagement Strategy in 2016–17Footnote vii.

Furthermore, CED will ensure the achievement of departmental priorities through its integrated planning and quarterly follow-up, which will allow for decisions and adjustments to be made in a timely manner. CED will continue to develop tools for the purpose of tailoring its activities to the environment; these tools include the development and implementation of regional strategies, and priority monitoring dashboards.

Through strategic monitoring, CED will also strive to remain constantly abreast of changes to the economic context and factors that could influence the economic development of the regions of Quebec.

CED will measure the effectiveness of its strategies for mitigating the risk associated with the organization’s adaptability through the following:

Key risks
Risks Risk response strategy Link to the Department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government wide and departmental priorities
Maintaining a functional and secure technology infrastructure
Risk that the existing technology infrastructure, the security thereof, and available information and related systems will not provide appropriate support for operational requirements, thereby affecting CED’s operating capacity.
  • Analyze and develop options to maintain CED’s technological capacity and meet needs relating to infrastructure, technology and an information management system.
  • 1.1 Business Development
  • 1.2 Regional Economic Development
  • 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies
  • 1.4 Internal Services
Innovation Agenda
Ability to adapt the delivery of its mandate in a changing economic environment
Risk regarding CED’s capacity to tailor the delivery of its mandate in response to the Government of Canada’s priorities and expected outcomes, the needs of the regions, and the economic context.
  • Plan and track departmental priorities
  • Continuously monitor the regional economic development context
  • Develop and communicate regional strategies
  • Maintain ongoing dialogue with stakeholders and the public
  • Develop tools to tailor CED’s activities
  • 1.1 Business Development
  • 1.2 Regional Economic Development
  • 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies
Innovation Agenda

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Programs

Program 1.1 Business Development

Description

This program is designed to support enterprises’ development throughout their life cycle so as to sustain Quebec’s economic growth. Businesses, particularly SMEs, are drivers of economic development. They are recognized as generating a significant share of economic activity and creating employment in communities.

CED supports the emergence of new enterprises and business succession. CED also works to increase the competitiveness of existing enterprises and support their survival by enhancing their performance. It does so by supporting projects that enable enterprises to modernize, expand, launch or extend their export activities, and strengthen their capacity to innovate, commercialize, and establish partnerships.

In this program, CED mainly targets businesses either directly or through non-profit organizations serving businesses and entrepreneurs. It promotes business development through a G&C program, called the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).Footnote 1

Planning highlights

For fiscal year 2017–18, CED plans to use the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)Footnote viii to focus on innovation, clean technologies and high-impact businesses, thereby contributing to implement in Quebec the Government of Canada’s Innovation Agenda and commitments in the most recent Budgets.

To this end, CED intends to:

Highlights

CED committed to support in 2017-18 the start-up of Damabois Énergie inc., a company that manufactures energy logs made of bark and densified aspen shavings. The project makes use of by-products with a low commercial value to market heating products for high environmental performance stoves.

In recent years, Quebec businesses have evolved in a favourable economic context. CED also increased its intervention within the Business Development program in order to support entrepreneurship and enhance businesses competitiveness. As illustrated in the table on the following page, CED results have increased over the past three years. Consequently, CED is targeting in 2017-18 a survival rate of 98% for businesses supported in their development and 93% for businesses supported in their start-up.

The adoption of digital and information technologies constitutes a success factor for the businesses that have been created, and helps existing businesses be more competitiveFootnote ix. Within the context of fierce global competition and technological change, the adoption of technological innovations and clean technologies has been identified by participants in CED’s Engagement StrategyFootnote x as an economic development issue in Quebec. The activities planned by CED will help address this issue.

The key factors of the current economic context could have an impact on CED’s business development activities, as stated in the key risk relating to CED’s capacity to adapt to its external environment.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
The pool of Quebec businesses is renewed Survival rate of businesses supported in their start-up Footnote xi 93% March 31, 2018 86% 91% 94%
Quebec businesses are competitive Survival rate of businesses supported in their development Footnote xii 98% March 31, 2018 97% 97% 99%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
145 866 881 145 866 881 136 290 418 136 530 866
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
121 139 139

Information on the CED’s lower-level programs is availableon the CED’s websiteFootnote xiii and in the TBS InfoBaseFootnote xiv.

Return to first footnote 1 referrer CED also promotes the capacities of Quebec companies to prime contractors in order to maximize the industrial and technological benefits generated by the Government of Canada's defense procurement projects in the aerospace, navy, land and security.

Program 1.2 Regional Economic Development

Description

This program is intended to strengthen the regions’ economic base so as to sustain the growth of Quebec’s economy. Quebec’s regions differ in, among other things, their industrial structure, and some are more sensitive to economic fluctuations than others. Quebec’s prosperity depends on the different regions’ participation in the economy to their full potential. CED contributes to building strong, competitive regions, and does so by supporting local communities as they take charge of their economic development and by stimulating investment in all Quebec regions.

In this program, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations active in economic development. It supports regional economic development through a G&C program, the QEDP.

Planning highlights

In 2017–18, CED plans to contribute to the economic diversification of the regions of Quebec through the implementation of its regional economic development program, thus also contributing to the Government of Canada’s Innovation Agenda.

To achieve its expected outcomes for 2017–18, CED plans to focus on the following activities:

In light of various factors including the drop in the Canadian dollar, the Conference Board of Canada is projecting a rise in spending in Quebec by tourists from outside the provinceFootnote xv. In 2017–18, CED aims to contribute to generating $3.9 billion in spending by tourists from outside Quebec. CED will also help attract or maintain $1.4 billion in foreign direct investment. Its funding to the regions aims to generate an overall investment of $21.7 million in the regions receiving support.

Within the context of the transformation of the province’s regional economic development and business support structure, CED’s support for mobilization and joint activities will foster greater consistency in terms of the approach and activities of the various regional players. Mobilizing community stakeholders to take charge of their development was another issue identified by participants in the Engagement StrategyFootnote xvi for the economic diversification of Quebec regions.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Quebec regions have a strong economic base Total amount of investment generated in regions supported that completed the implementation of their development project $21.7M March 31, 2018 $8.1M $2.7M $25M
Amount spent by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported $3.9B March 31, 2018 $3.4B $3.5B $3.8B
Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported $1.4B March 31, 2018 $1.395B $1.197B $1.7B
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
34 883 447 34 883 447 33 080 533 33 140 615
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
20 30 30

Information on the CED’s lower-level programs is available on the CED’s websiteFootnote xvii and in the TBS InfoBaseFootnote xviii.

Program 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

Description

In addition to its regular programs, CED develops, administers and implements Canada-wide programs or temporary and/or targeted initiatives. The common objective throughout is to strengthen community economies in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth. CED thus supports communities’ economic development. CED also supports economic activity in Quebec communities that are undergoing economic shocks, experiencing significant development challenges or attending to grasp long-term business opportunities.

This program targets non-profit organizations and businesses. In this program, CED uses dedicated, temporary or permanent additional funding from the Government of Canada, or specific funds which it allocates via the QEDP. It also intervenes by means of a permanent fund dedicated to the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Planning highlights

In 2017–18, CED plans to help strengthen community economies through this program, thus contributing to the implementation of the Innovation Agenda.

CED will step up its efforts with respect to inclusive growth, especially through its support for Indigenous communities and Anglophones minority communities through the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative, as well as economic diversification through local entrepreneurship in the regions and targeted support to communities experiencing an economic shock.

To this end, CED plans to focus on the following activities:

Highlights

As part of Canada’s 150th anniversary celebrations, CED has granted $102,500 in funding to the Anicinapek of Kitcisakik Band Council under the theme “Strong, active, united communities.” The project will help upgrade the community’s outside skating rink, thus allowing it to maintain its community vocation and remain open and accessible to the public

The CFP evaluationFootnote xix published in 2015 reports on the relevance of the entrepreneurship services provided to the regions by regional development agencies. The previous results for this program also show that CED’s impact with businesses, through the CFP, is growing from year to year. CED thus aims to achieve a 24% higher survival rate for CFP-supported businesses compared with comparable businesses, three years after the end of their project.

CED also plans to generate one-time or targeted investments of $208 million in the communities supported.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013–14
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Quebec communities have strong economies CFP: Percentage point increase in the survival rate of CFP clients who have received assistance compared with comparable businesses that did not receive assistance 24
percentage points
March 31, 2018 18
percentage points
20
percentage points
26
percentage points
Infrastructure Modernization: Value of total investment generated in communitiesFootnote 1 n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Temporary or Targeted Support: Amount of total investment generated in communities $208M March 31, 2018 $86.2M $23.4M $48.9M

Return to first footnote 1 referrerExpected results with respect to this program appear in Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Plan.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
104 721 027 104 721 027 47 118 599 39 355 723
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
51 20 20

Information on the CED’s lower-level programs is availableon the CED’s websiteFootnote xx and in the TBS InfoBaseFootnote xxi.

Internal Services

Program 1.4 Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Planning highlights

In 2017–18, CED plans to contribute to the priorities of the Clerk of the Privy Council, as well as to the Government’s priorities relating to the renewal of the public service, through its activities carried out by the Internal Services division.

CED will pay particular attention to the implementation of the Federal Public Service Workplace Mental Health Strategy and collaborative efforts relating to the development of the Common System for Grants and Contributions.

To this end, CED plans to carry out the following activities:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
18 345 114 18 345 114 18 266 055 18 266 879
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned full-time equivalents
134 132 132

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

This section presents an overview of CED’s planned spending and human resources (FTEs) for the next three consecutive fiscal years, starting with 2017–18. Planned spending is also compared with the current and previous years’ actual spending. The dark blue bar corresponds to expenditures in grants and contributions and operating expenses within the framework of its programs. The light blue bar shows statutory expenditures related to the CED Employee Benefit Plan.

Figure 1: CED’s Actual Spending and Planned Spending Trend, April 1, 2015 to March 31, 2019

Departmental spending trend graph
*Figures for future years (2016–17 to 2018–19) are based on the authorities established in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities.

Figure 1 - Long description

CED’s program spending has grown between 2014 and 2017. Spending peaked at $318 million in 2016–17. In 2017–18, CED’S total Planned Spending is $304 million. The funding gap for voted appropriations from 2018 to 2019 is due, among other things, to the termination of certain Temporary Initiatives and the reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments that are included in the 2017–18 planned spending, but not for subsequent years; official approvals for these fiscal years had not been obtained at the time of writing this Departmental Plan.

Details of the fluctuations can be found in the description of the Budgetary planning summary for Programs and Internal Services.

Budgetary planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)Footnote 2
Programs and Internal
Services
2014–15
Expenditures
2015–16
Expenditures
2016–17
Forecast spending
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Program 1.1.: Business Development 146 564 462 147 576 913 178 497 274 145 866 881 145 866 881 136 290 418 136 530 866
Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development 34 133 620 33 610 006 31 380 956 34 883 447 34 883 447 33 080 533 33 140 615
Program 1.3: Strengthening Community Economies 55 328 034 60 180 857 90 278 113 104 721 027 104 721 027 47 118 599 39 355 723
Subtotal 236 026 116 241 367 776 300 156 343 285 471 355 285 471 355 216 489 550 209 027 204
Internal Services 17 871 800 17 829 224 17 508 129 18 345 114 18 345 114 18 266 055 18 266 879
Total 253 897 916 259 197 000 317 664 472 303 816 469 303 816 469 234 755 605 227 294 083

Return to first footnote 2 referrerThe reinvestment of income from the repayment of contributions by clients is included in the planned spending for 2017–18, but not included in future years; the main estimates for those fiscal years not being established and authorized.

Over the past three fiscal years, total CED expenditures have increased from nearly $254 million to $318 million. The anticipated increase in total CED spending in 2016–17 is due in part to increased revenues from the repayment of contributions by clients, a temporary increase in planned spending levels for the extension of the natural gas transmission system between Lévis and Sainte-Claire (Bellechasse gas pipeline) and the funding of the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP 150 - Component I and II).

Although CED received a dedicated budget in 2016–17 to deliver CIP 150, it is expected that the majority of disbursements will be realized in 2017–18, given the nature of the projects, namely, rehabilitation and improvement of infrastructures. In order to adapt continuously to the challenges and issues faced by businesses and regions in Québec, CED carries out, as necessary, a reallocation of the financial resources available between the various programs of its PAA.

As a result, there is a one-time increase in spending under Program 1.1 Business Development in 2016–17.

The decrease in planned spending from 2018 to 2019 in the Strengthening Community Economies Program is attributable to a reduction in funding of the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, as well as the end of the CIP 150 Program and Bellechasse gas pipeline in the next two (2) years.

For fiscal year 2017–18, total CED expenditures in grants and contributions and operating costs are $304 million. Of this amount, $263 million is expected to be invested in grants and contributions. The operating budget and benefits will be $41 million.

Planned human resources

Human resources planning summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2014–15 Full-time
equivalents
2015–16 Full-time
equivalents
2016–17 Forecast
full-time equivalents
2017–18 Planned
full-time equivalents
2018–19 Planned
full-time equivalents
2019–20 Planned
full-time equivalents
Program 1.1.: Business Development 121 134 122 121 139 139
Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development 20 16 20 20 30 30
Program 1.3: Strengthening Community Economies 47 37 52 51 20 20
Subtotal 188 187 194 192 189 189
Internal Services 127 128 141 134 132 132
Total 315 315 335 326 321 321

The FTEs used have increased over the past three years, from 315 in 2014-15 to 335 in 2016-17. This situation is notably attributable to the implementation of CIP 150 and the allocation of resources to government-wide activities and initiatives, CED’s transformation and simplification, such as the development of a common system for grants and contributions. For fiscal year 2017-2018, CED plans to use 326 FTEs to deliver its mandate and to support its current and future major and government-wide projects.

It is noteworthy that starting in 2018–19, the number of FTEs will decrease considerably in the Strengthening Community Economies program 1.3. That reduction is attributable chiefly to the end of the CIP 150 on March 31, 2018. Resources usually dedicated to CED’s Business Development Program 1.1 and Regional Economic Development Program 1.2 were allocated for a 2-year period for the delivery of the temporary program. The end of that program will consequently allow for a substantial return of human resource efforts in those two programs, with the goal of supporting all the activities of its mandate and intensifying its efforts in connection with the priorities of CED and the Government.¿

Estimates by vote

For information on CED’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2017–18 Main EstimatesFootnote xxii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of CED’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the CED’s websiteFootnote xxiii.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2016–17
Forecast results
2017–18
Planned results
Difference
(2017–18 Planned results minus 2016–17 Forecast results)
Total expensesFootnote 3 201,922,000 215,233,000 13,311,000
Total revenues 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfert 201,922,000 215,233,000 13,311,000

Return to first footnote 3 referrer Expenses reflect the economic resources used by CED during a period to deliver the programs in its PAA, and are of two types: transfer payments and operating expenses. Expenses calculated in the context of the Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Section III) differ from those presented in sections I and II of the Departmental Plan, since unconditionally repayable contributions are accounted for as loans, thus reducing total transfer payment expenses.

In 2017–18, CED’s total net expenditures are projected to be $215.2 million, a 6.6% increase over the previous fiscal year. This increase in net expenditures for 2017–18 is mainly due to an upward forecast of non-repayable transfer payments due to Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program. On the other hand, a reduction in expenses is planned following the completion of the extension of the natural gas network project between Lévis and Sainte-Claire in Quebec. In addition, a decrease in operating expenses is anticipated as a result of the completion of the Building Canada Fund program.

CED’s planned expenditures consist largely of transfer payments, which are payments related to non-repayable and conditionally repayable contributions. These are projected to total $168.5 million in 2017–18 and represent an increase of 9.3% compared to 2016–17.

CED’s revenues, returned to the consolidated revenue fund, are declared in its financial statements as being earned on the government's behalf. As a result, the organization's net revenues are zero. Note that CED’s total gross revenues are forecast to amount to $358 thousand in 2017–18, a decrease of $185 thousand in comparison to fiscal year 2016–17. The planned amount for 2017–18 represents the average of net revenues of the organization for the past few years.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s):

The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Developmentand Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Institutional head: Manon Brassard

Ministerial portfolio: Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling instrument(s):

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ActFootnote xxiv

S.C. 2005, c. 26

Year of incorporation/commencement: 2005

Reporting framework

The CED Strategic Outcome[s] and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2017–18 are shown below:

1. Strategic Outcome - Quebec’s Regions have a growing Economy

Program 1.1.
Business Deveolopment

Program 1.2.
Regional Economic
Development

Program 1.3.
Strengthening of Community Economics

Sub-program 1.1.1.
Support for Entrepreneurship

Sub-program 1.2.1.
Mobilization of Regions

Sub-program 1.3.1.
Community Futures Program

Sub-program 1.1.2.
Entreprises' Performance

Sub-program 1.2.2.
Investment in the Regions

Sub-program 1.3.2.
Modernization of Infrastructure

Sub-program 1.3.3.
AD-HOC Targeted Support

Program 1.4 Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower-level programs is available on the CED’s websiteFootnote xxv and in theTBS InfoBaseFootnote xxvi.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the CED’s websiteFootnote xxvii.

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax ExpendituresFootnote xxviii. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec H3B 2T9

CANADA

Phone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302

Website

Appendix A - Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

Full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government-wide priorities
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

Horizontal initiatives
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-Budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned Spending
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

Plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

Supplementary Tables

The supplementary information tables of the 2017–18 Departmental Report are available on CED’s website

A. Upcoming Evaluations Over the Next Five Fiscal Years

B. Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

A. Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations Over the Next Five Fiscal Years

Programs planned to be evaluated in the next five years
Fiscal year (of the planned date for deputy head approval of the evaluation report) Title of the evaluation Completion of last evaluation Link to department’s Program Inventory Planned spending associated with the program(s) evaluated (dollars)
2017–18 Evaluation of the Canada Business Network 2014 1.1 (Non-payroll only)
2013-2014: 1 874 501
2014-2015: 1 646 285
2015-2016: 2 089 550
2016-2017: 1 877 735 *
2017-2018: 1 877 735 *
Total: $9,365,806

*Planned spending
2018–19 Evaluation of Community Futures Program (CFP) 2015 1.3.1 (Payroll, non-payroll, and contributions)

2013-2014: 29 697 467
2014-2015: 29 670 820
2015-2016: 29 820 770
2016-2017: 30 194 018 *
2017-2018: 30 194 018 *
Total: $149,577,093

*Planned spending
2019–20 S/O S/O S/O S/O
2020–21 S/O S/O S/O S/O
2021–22 Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) 2016–17 1 S/O
Total organizational spending Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable. $158,942,899 *

*Includes non-payroll, payroll, and contributions planned spending.

B. Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)
(Voted payments)

Start date

April 1, 2012

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Grant and contribution

Type of appropriation

The QEDP receives an annual allocation of funds through the expenses budget.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

N/A

Link to department’s Program Inventory

The QEDP comprises three programs and five sub-programs, which are presented in detail in the “Expected Results” section.

Description

The QEDP contributes to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate. The QEDP includes repayable and non-repayable contributions.

Expected results

Program 1.1 – Business Development:

  • Contribute to support for entrepreneurship:
    Enterprises are created or transferred (result measured by the percentage of enterprises started up).
  • Contribute to enterprises’ performance:
    Enterprises maintain or improve their performance (result measured by the percentage of enterprises supported which have maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue).

Program 1.2 - Regional Economic Development:

  • Contribute to mobilization of regions:
    Communities take charge of their economic development (result measured by the percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization or planning projects).
  • Contribute to investment in the regions:
    Quebec regions attract investment or generate economic spinoffs (result measured by the number of communities which modernize or acquire community economic facilities; number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions; and number of international organizations and foreign enterprises maintained, in expansion or attracted to the supported regions).

Program 1.3 - Strengthening Community Economies:

  • Provide ad-hoc support for Quebec communities’ economic activity to stabilize or strengthen their economies:
    Communities have stabilized or strengthened their economies (result measured by such indicators as the number of communities supported which receive ad-hoc or targeted support).

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) came into effect on June 17, 2010, and ended on March 31, 2013. The evaluation was completed in 2016. TISQFE was one of the initiatives under Program 1.3 - Strengthening Community Economies.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

The Initiative was temporary, and was planned to end on March 31, 2013.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

2021-2022.

General targeted recipient groups

The main recipients under the QEDP are small and medium-sized enterprises, SME groups or associations, not-for-profit organizations, including those whose primary mission is to support businesses and foster economic development, as well as asset-operating organizations, organizations or institutions dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of knowledge, including universities and educational institutions, the Quebec government, and municipalities and municipal organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

CED keeps the public, SMEs and Quebec regional economic development stakeholders informed of its Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) through a wide range of communication tools and activities geared to the profile and information needs of those diverse audiences.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2016–17
Forecast spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Total grants 1 650 000 1 650 000 1 650 000 1 650 000
Total contributions 244 343 700 232 111 487 163 198 309 155 734 787
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 245 993 700 233 761 487 164 848 309 157 384 787

Name of transfer payment program

Community Futures Program (CFP)

Start date

May 18, 1995

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

The CFP receives an annual allocation of funds through the expenses budget.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

N/A

Link to department’s Program Inventory

The CFP corresponds to a sub-program:
1.3.1. Community Futures Program.

Description

This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs). The CFP includes only non-repayable contributions.

Expected results

Communities are economically sustainable (result measured by the percentage points by which the growth in sales of CFP-assisted clients exceeds that of comparable unassisted firms).

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation

The CFP evaluation, with the objective of evaluating its relevance and performance, was completed in 2015-2016.

Decision following the results of last evaluation

Following the evaluation of the CFP, it was decided to continue this program

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

CED will complete the CFP evaluation in 2018-2019.

General targeted recipient groups

In Quebec, the CFP provides financial support for community development organizations, such as CFDCs and BDCs.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients

CED continues to inform community development organizations and community stakeholders of the support provided by the Government of Canada through the CFP.

Planning information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2016–17
Forecast spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
Total grants 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 28 968 018 28 968 018 28 968 018 28 968 018
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total program 28 968 018 28 968 018 28 968 018 28 968 018

Related Information on Lower-Level Programs

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to CED’s Program Inventory is available in the TBS InfoBase.

1.1.1 Sub-program: Entrepreneurship Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing the pool of enterprises in Quebec. Entrepreneurial dynamism is lower in Quebec than in the rest of Canada. CED hopes to boost entrepreneurial dynamism throughout Quebec. It does so by encouraging business pre-startups and startups, and by supporting the survival of existing enterprises through succession planning and business transfers. In this SP, CED provides support to enterprises or non-profit organizations that support enterprises and entrepreneurs, such as entrepreneurship centres, incubators, and transfer and spinoff organizations. CED contributes to supporting entrepreneurship through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Enterprises are started up Percentage of enterprises started up 41% March 31, 2018 37% 43% 38%
Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)*
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
28,667,429 26,684,494 26,732,563
Human resources (Full-time Equivalents (FTEs)) *
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
23 26 26

1.1.2 Sub-program: Business Performance

Description

The goal of this sub-program (SP) is to increase Quebec enterprises’ performance and competitiveness. The productivity of the Quebec economy is lower than the average for the rest of Canada, and productivity gains can be achieved among other things through investment carried out by Quebec enterprises. In fact, in the context of growing global competition, Quebec enterprises wishing to develop or ensure their survival have to innovate and convert their ideas into business opportunities, enhance their productivity and penetrate new markets. CED accompanies enterprises from the different regions of Quebec to help them meet these challenges. It does so by encouraging them to invest to optimize their production and increase their efforts with respect to innovation, technology transfer, commercialization and exports. CED also assists in the structuring of business networks in which enterprises operate. CED’s intervention in this SP is aimed at enterprises and non-profit organizations that support enterprises. CED acts on enterprises’ performance through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Enterprises improve their performance. Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue 62% March 31, 2018 70% 65% 58%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
117,199,452 109,605,924 109,798,303
Human resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
98 113 113

1.2.1 Sub-program: Regional Engagement

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at supporting local communities as they take charge of their development so as to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions. Local accountability with regard to local economic development and the synergy with which stakeholders interact are success factors in eliciting the establishment of growth-generating projects. CED sustains the growth and diversification of Quebec communities by supporting engagement and joint action by the various stakeholders, planning of their economic development, canvassing, pursuit of funding and implementation of structuring, recovery or diversification initiatives. In this SP, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations with an economic role. CED acts on Regional Engagement through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Communities take charge of their economic development Number of communities supported that conduct planning or mobilization initiatives. 10 March 31, 2018 16 14 10
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
3,705,679 3,638,140 3,644,167
Human resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
4 6 6

1.2.2 Sub-program: Regional investment

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing investment in the different regions of Quebec so as to strengthen their economic activity base. Quebec’s regions are faced with global competition, and have to compete to attract investment needed to maximize their economic growth. Quebec must build on its current strengths, such as: access to the North American market, a diversified economy, niches of excellence, skilled workers, an enviable quality of life, abundant resources, distinctive tourism, and more. CED supports regions in their efforts to acquire the equipment necessary to harness their assets in order to stimulate business and generate economic spinoffs. It also does so by enhancing promotion of regional assets with a view to increasing tourist spending and attraction of foreign direct investment through foreign firms and international organizations. In this SP, CED focusses on non-profit organizations. CED intervenes in the Regional Investment SP through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Quebec regions attract investment. Number of communities that modernize or acquire community economic facilities. 5 March 31, 2018 5 4 6
Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions 6.7M March 31, 2018 6.6M 6.5M 6.4M
Number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained in, expanding in or attracted to the regions supported 55 March 31, 2018 48 50 63
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
31,177,768 29,442,393 29,496,448
Human resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
16 24 24

1.3.1 Sub-program: Community Futures Program

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at assisting local economic development in rural areas in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec communities. This SP implements a national program called the Community Futures Program (CFP). The CFP plays an important role in strengthening the ability of rural communities to diversify their economic base to foster long-term prosperity and sustainability. By means of the CFP, CED encourages Quebec rural communities’ planning and socio-economic development, access to capital, availability of consulting services and support for local projects. CED delivers the CFP in Quebec with the help of Community Futures Development Corporations and Business Development Centres, by means of contribution agreements.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Communities are economically sustainable Percentage point increase in the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance over comparable enterprises not having received support 2.5 percentage points March 31, 2018 8.1 percentage points 3.4 percentage points 2.2 percentage points
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
30,272,025 30,288,366 30,288,441
Human resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
12 12 12

1.3.2 Sub-program: Infrastructure Modernization

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at ensuring sound and effective management of infrastructure programs in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec’s communities. Quality public infrastructure is a key factor in economic development. CED acts as Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for the administration in Quebec of their different programs, including the Building Canada Fund (Community and Large Urban Centres component) and the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF). These programs are covered in agreements between Infrastructures Canada and the Quebec government, and are aimed primarily at municipalities.

Planned results Footnote a
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure Number of communities with public infrastructure completed according to the terms of the contribution agreement Not available Not available Not available Not available Not available
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
0 0 0
Human resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
0 0 0

1.3.3 Sub-program: Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at providing targeted and/or temporary support for Quebec communities’ economic activity in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies. The shifting context requires a real-time response that is geared to certain local needs or is consistent with specific government priorities. Quebec communities facing economic shocks, natural disasters or situations that can have an adverse impact on their economic development, and that are facing serious economic development issues or presented with development opportunities likely to have a positive impact on the regions. This SP is aimed primarily at enterprises and NPOs. CED intervenes through temporary or dedicated additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds allocated by the Agency through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Planned results
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2013-14
Actual results
2014-15
Actual results
2015-16
Actual results
Communities have targeted and/or temporary support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies Number of communities supported receiving targeted and/or temporary support 94 March 31, 2018 88 66 71
Budgetary financial resources (dollars) *
2017-18
Planned spending
2018-19
Planned spending
2019-20
Planned spending
74,449,002 16,830,233 9,067,282
Human Resources (FTEs)*
2017-18
Planned FTEs
2018-19
Planned FTEs
2019-20
Planned FTEs
39 8 8
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