2015-2016 Report on Plans and Priorities

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

ISSN number : 1494-3867

Publish date : March 31, 2015

Summary :

Read through this report, which presents the Agency's priorities and expected results in 2015-16.

Table of Contents

  1. Minister's Message
  2. Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview
  3. Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
  4. Section III - Supplementary Information
  5. Section IV - Organization Contact Information
  6. Appendix - Definitions
  7. Endnotes
  8. Supplementary Information Tables

Minister's Message

Denis LebelI am pleased to submit the Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–16 for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED). This document describes the priority areas of intervention through which CED will be supporting enterprises’ competitiveness and economic growth in Quebec regions over the next few years.

While the global economy is fragile, Canada is posting a sound performance. Quebec’s SMEs and regions are facing serious challenges to remain competitive, stand out and prosper. That is why the Government of Canada has placed the economy, growth and employment among its top priorities. CED’s mission is central to this Canada-wide commitment.

We will continue promoting the economic development of communities and regions, for instance by enhancing their economic assets, or by providing support for communities struggling with economic development issues. Assistance for the economic recovery of Lac Mégantic and the economic diversification of communities dependent on the chrysotile asbestos industry are examples of CED’s long-term efforts in the field.

Finally, we will continue our modernization efforts by contributing actively to government initiatives to build the Public Service of the Future, and by offering, more efficiently than ever, programs and services catering to the needs of SMEs and the regions.

I encourage you to read through this report, which describes CED’s priorities and expected results in 2015–16 with a view to contributing to the economic vitality of Quebec’s enterprises and regions.

Denis Lebel
Minister of Infrastructure, Communities and
Intergovernmental Affairs and
Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview

1.1 Organizational Profile

Minister: The Honourable Denis Lebel

Chief Executive Officer: Marie Lemay

Ministerial Portfolio: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Authorities: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ActFootnote 1

Year Established: 2005

1.2 Organizational Context

1.2.1 Raison d’être and Responsibilities

Object
Under its Act,Footnote2which came into effect on October 5, 2005, CED's object is to "promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate."

Strategic Outcome
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Vision
Quebec regions and enterprises participate to their full potential in the economy of tomorrow, building on their respective assets.

As part of its mission, CED promotes the start-up and performance of businesses. It helps them become more competitive, productive, innovative and active on Canadian and foreign markets. It supports communities’ engagement efforts in Quebec’s regions and helps to attract investment that will increase the prosperity of the Quebec and Canadian economies.

CED thus contributes to the economic vitality of all Quebec regions, by paying special attention to communities with low economic growth, as stipulated in its enabling Act. In this respect, the CED uses an Economic Development IndexFootnote 3 which allows it, among other things, to determine the economic development levels of Quebec’s 104 communitiesFootnote 4 in order to meet needs effectively.

CED works with businesses, primarily small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as non-profit organizations (NPOs) through its business offices.Footnote 5 By providing financial assistance for projects, among other things, CED supports their development efforts.

CED’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development.Footnote 6 It is:

  • consistent with government priorities and national strategies in line with its object and anticipated results;
  • geared to the economic issues and challenges of Quebec’s enterprises and its different regions by building on their assets and potential; and
  • collaborative with economic agents, such as local partners, other federal departments and agencies, the Quebec government and municipal organizations.

CED’s Grants and Contributions Programs and Initiatives, 2015–16Footnote 7

Main program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

  • Targeted and/or temporary initiatives:
    • Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
    • Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec (SICSBOQ)
    • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI)

Canada-wide program implemented in Quebec by CED:

  • Community Futures Program (CFP)

Infrastructure Canada's delivery partner for administration in Quebec:Footnote 8

  • Building Canada Fund–Quebec (BCF)

1.2.2 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

This report is structured according to CED’s Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), which came into effect on April 1, 2012. The following list presents CED’s complete framework of four programs and seven sub-programs,Footnote 9 the links among them, and the strategic outcome to which they contribute.

1. Strategic Outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

  • 1.1 Program: Business Development
    • 1.1.1 Sub-program: Entrepreneurship Support
    • 1.1.2 Sub-program: Business Performance
  • 1.2 Program: Regional Economic Development
    • 1.2.1 Sub-program: Regional Engagement
    • 1.2.2 Sub-program: Regional Investment
  • 1.3 Program: Strengthening Community Economies
    • 1.3.1 Sub-program: Community Futures Program
    • 1.3.2 Sub-program: Infrastructure Modernization
    • 1.3.3 Sub-program: Targeted and/or Temporary Support
  • 1.4 Program: Internal Services

1.2.3 Organizational Priorities

Priorities represent the areas on which CED has decided to focus, but do not exclude the execution of activities in other areas of the PAA. These priorities are established to reflect those of the Government of Canada, targeted departmental results and risks, and the economic challenges of the different regions of Quebec. During FY 2015–16, CED has chosen the following three priorities, which are in line with those presented in its latest Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs):

Priority #1

Continue supporting the maintenance and growth of enterprises

TypeFootnote 10

Ongoing

Program

1.1 Business Development

Description

Why is this a priority?

Enterprises create employment and wealth. They play an important role in Quebec’s prosperity by stimulating economic activity in the communities and regions where they are based.

Following a year of weaker growth owing to a decline in residential and business investment, economic growth should strengthen in Quebec as a result of increased business investmentFootnote 11 and exports.

CED therefore intends to continue supporting Quebec enterprises as they meet challenges likely to slow down or curb their development. In this way, they will be able to harness the opportunities afforded by the economic recovery in the U.S. and the signing of different free trade agreements, including the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between Canada and the European Union.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  1. Optimize its intervention with regard to SMEs and NPOs in support of enterprises:
    CED will implement its intervention in order to contribute to business development by focussing on projects submitted by SMEs and NPOs aimed at:
    • creation and startup of enterprises;
    • productivity and expansion;
    • innovation and technology transfer; and
    • commercialization and exports.
       
    Through business offices’ regional strategies and integrated departmental planning, CED intends to direct its intervention in line with its priorities.
  2. Promote and strengthen Quebec enterprises’ capabilities within the framework of the Government of Canada’s procurement strategies
    CED will work to strengthen Quebec SMEs’ capability to harness the business opportunities arising from the Government of Canada’s procurement strategies, in particular those in the defence field, with a view to maximizing the industrial and technological spinoffs in Quebec.
Priority #2

Contribute to the development of the economy of communities and regions, in particular through targeted and/or temporary support

Type

Ongoing (wording revised since FY 2014–15)

Program

1.2 Regional Economic Development
1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

Why is this a priority?

Communities contribute to Quebec’s economic growth and long-term prosperity. In some cases, tailored support is required in order to foster development of the economy and the vitality of Quebec communities.

Quebec’s regions and communities sometimes have to deal with a major economic shock or meet special challenges. Similarly, specific development opportunities emerge, and represent opportunities to be grasped. In these situations, it is appropriate for CED to introduce tailored intervention measures to boost weakened economic activity or harness development opportunities.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

  1. Continued implementation of the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
    • Building on its efforts of previous years, CED will continue to contribute to the economic recovery of the town of Lac Mégantic, hard hit by the rail disaster of July 6, 2013, by accompanying local agents in their economic development efforts.
    • The $35-million envelope involves the following three components:
      • $20 million for rebuilding the town;
      • $10 million to support economic and commercial activity; and
      • $5 million for the creation of two investment funds managed by the CFDC: a first fund with $3 million for economic and commercial recovery, and a second with $2 million for upgrading and construction of community infrastructure.
  2. Continued implementation of the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • With a $50-million envelope, this initiative helps attain the Government of Canada’s priority, set out in its Economic Action Plan (EAP, 2013), of supporting the economic transition of communities associated with the chrysotile asbestos industry to the secondary and tertiary sectors.
    • CED will continue to guide communities and enterprises in the Des Appalaches and Des Sources RCMs in their efforts to strengthen their economic base and increase their long-term growth potential.
  3. Planning and funding of community economic facilities (CEF)
    • This component is intended to generate investment in the regions by supporting the planning and funding of community facilities likely to contribute to economic growth or communities’ vitality.
  4. Upgrading of facilities to boost the local economy
    • Through its activities under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED funds projects leading to the upgrading of local facilities which contribute to economic activity and the vitality of small communities.
Priority #3

Continue the Agency’s modernization to enhance its performance

Type

Ongoing (wording revised since FY 2014–15)

Programs

All

Why is this a priority?

In line with Government of Canada priorities, modernization of CED’s procedures will help enhance its performance and provide its clients with improved service in a stimulating context for its employees.

What are the plans for meeting this priority?

In 2015–16, CED intends to complete its modernization through:

  • enhancement of its service delivery to Canadians, by continuing the simplification and modernization of its business processes and completing its preparations for the migration of CED’s website to Canada.ca by December 2016.
  • optimization of internal processes and improvement of the tools at its employees’ disposal through the implementation of innovative approaches to information management and use of technology.
  • implementation of tangible measures for building the Public Service of the Future by continuing its initiatives stemming from the Destination 2020 action plan and fostering a collaborative, innovative, stimulating workplace.

1.2.4 Risk Analysis

To achieve its results, CED ensures that it has ongoing analysis of the environment so it can recognize and understand the new challenges and opportunities that have a marked influence on its intervention. It incorporates risk management into its decision-making processes and departmental planning, and implements appropriate risk response strategies to attain its results and enhance decision-making and allocation of its resources.

The table below presents the risks, associated response strategies, and the link to the PAA and organizational priorities.

Corporate Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
External Risk

Economic Risk and Institutional Capacity

Risk that the pursuit of priorities and expected results from CED’s economic development programs may be affected by the economic context and the various changes likely to affect support for regional development and assistance to enterprises

  • Ongoing watch on changes in the context of regional economic development in Quebec;
  • Analysis of the impact for CED of the various changes likely to affect support for regional development and assistance to enterprises;
  • Maintenance of regional watch and analysis capability in order to adjust program delivery, as required;
  • Development and implementation of specific or temporary initiatives in response to issues specific to the regions; and
  • Implementation of an external communication strategy to reflect adjustments to CED’s priorities or programming, as applicable.

Program 1.1

Program 1.2

Program 1.3

1.3 Planned Spending

This section provides an overview of planned financial and human resources.

Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 12 (Planned Spending – dollars)
Main Estimates
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018Footnote 13
261,082,194 261,082,194 244,615,197 239,804,621
Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
316 316 316
Table 1 – Budgetary Planning Summary by Strategic Outcome and ProgramFootnote 14 (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services Expenditures 2012–2013Footnote 15 Expenditures 2013-2014 Forecast Spending 2014-2015 Main Estimates 2015-2016 Planned Spending 2015-2016 Planned Spending 2016-2017 Planned Spending 2017-2018Footnote 16
Strategic Outcome #1: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy
Program 1.1:
Business Development
130,483,270 147,594,135 137,631,156 151,677,176 151,677,176 140,314,211 139,815,622
Program 1.2:
Regional Economic Development
44,054,296 39,132,388 45,877,052 35,237,511 35,237,511 32,313,131 32,297,398
Program 1.3:
Strengthening Community Economies
102,808,455 64,286,545 51,572,138 53,720,902 53,720,902 51,673,326 47,966,263
Subtotal – Strategic Outcome #1 277,346,021 251,013,068 235,080,346 240,635,589 240,635,589 224,300,668 220,079,283
Subtotal – Internal Services 19,083,325 18,292,750 18,043,927 20,446,605 20,446,605 20,314,529 19,725,338
TOTAL 296,429,346 269,305,818 253,124,273 261,082,194 261,082,194 244,615,197 239,804,621

Analysis of Planned Spending by PAA Program (2015–16)

For FY 2015–16, CED’s total grants and contributions (G&C) expenditures and operating expenditures should amount to $261 million. Of this, $218 million should be invested in G&C in projects involving economic development, while $43 million should be used for operations.

A. Forecasts for PAA programs, excluding Internal Services

Table 1 shows that CED’s planned spending for 2015–16, aside from that associated with Internal Services, should reach $240.6 million, thus accounting for 92% of its total expenditures. Spending should be divided among CED’s PAA programs as follows:

  • 63% for Business Development;
  • 15% for Regional Economic Development; and
  • 22% for Strengthening Community Economies.

B. Performance of Internal Services

Table 1 also shows that CED’s planned spending in 2015–16 in the Internal Services program of its PAA should amount to $20.4 million, thus accounting for 8% of its total anticipated expenditures.

1.4 Alignment of Spending With Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of Planned Spending for 2015–16 with the Whole-of-Government Frameworki (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome Planned Spending
2015-2016
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy 1.1 Business Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 151,677,176
1.2 Regional Economic Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 35,237,511
1.3 Strengthening Community Economies Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 53,720,902
1.4 Internal Services Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 20,446,605
Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs 261,082,194
Social Affairs N/A
International Affairs N/A
Government Affairs N/A

1.5 Departmental Spending Trend

The figure below shows CED’s actual and planned spending trends during the previous three and next two fiscal years. The light grey bar corresponds to grants and contributions (G&C) and operating expenditures under its programs,Footnote 17 while the dark grey bar indicates those associated with sunset programs. The black bar corresponds to statutory expenditures associated with CED employees’ fringe benefit plan.

Figure 1: CED’s Spending Trend, 2012–2018

Figure 1: CED’s Spending Trend, 2012–2018

Figure 1 : CED’s Spending Trend, 2012–2018: Long Description

The figure below shows CED’s actual and planned spending trends during the previous three and next two fiscal years. The light grey bar corresponds to grants and contributions (G&C) and operating expenditures under its programs, while the dark grey bar indicates those associated with sunset programs. The black bar corresponds to statutory expenditures associated with CED employees’ fringe benefit plan.

From 2013–14 to 2017–18, expenditures associated with CED’s regular programs will hold steady, and funding levels for these programs will remain constant year to year.

In 2015–16, CED’s total planned spending is $261 million. This difference, starting in 2015–16 and subsequent years, is attributable to the reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments that is included in planned spending for 2015–16, but not for 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the Main Estimates for those fiscal years are not available at this stage.

With respect to sunset programs, CED’s expenditures depend on the targeted and/or temporary initiatives put in place during the fiscal years covered by this report. For FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue delivery of the following temporary initiatives in Quebec, without being limited to them: the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile (2013–2020). CED will also continue to deliver the Canada-wide Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018.

 

From 2013–14 to 2017–18, expenditures associated with CED’s regular programs will hold steady, and funding levels for these programs will remain constant year to year.

In 2015–16, CED’s total planned spending is $261 million. This difference, starting in 2015–16 and subsequent years, is attributable to the reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments that is included in planned spending for 2015–16, but not for 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the Main Estimates for those fiscal years have not been authorized at this stage.

With respect to sunset programs, CED’s expenditures depend on the targeted and/or temporary initiatives put in place during the fiscal years covered by this report. For FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue delivery of the following temporary initiatives in Quebec, without being limited to them: the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile (2013–2020). CED will also continue to deliver the Canada-wide Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018.

1.6 Estimates by Vote

For information on CED’s voted appropriations, please consult the Main Estimates 2015–16.ii

Section II - Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section provides information on CED’s planning, with regard to its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), shown below. It reviews CED’s programs and sub-programsFootnote 18 which contribute to achievement of its strategic outcome, providing for each of them a brief description and a forecast of the human and financial resources required to attain the organization’s expected performance targets.Footnote 19

1. Strategic Outcome – Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

Program 1.1
Business Development

Program 1.2
Regional Economic Development

Program 1.3
Strengthening Community Economies

Sub-program 1.1.1:
Entrepreneurship Support

Sub-program 1.2.1:
Regional Engagement

Sub-program 1.3.1:
Community Futures Program

Sub-program 1.1.2:
Business Performance

Sub-program 1.2.1:
Regional Investment

Sub-program 1.3.2:
Infrastructure Modernization

 
 

Sub-program 1.3.3:
Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Program 1.4
Internal Services

 

2.1 Strategic Outcome (SO): Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

Overall Performance
SO Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment ScheduleFootnote 20
Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their gross domestic product 17 2016-2017
Percentage of Quebec communitiesFootnote 21 having improved their economic performanceFootnote 22 65% 2016-2017

2.2 Program 1.1 – Business Development

Strategic Outcome #1
Quebec's Regions Have A Growing Economy

Program 1.1
Business Development

Sub-program 1.1.1:
Entrepreneurship Support

Sub-program 1.1.2:
Business Performance

 

Description

This program (P) is designed to support enterprises throughout their life cycle so as to sustain Quebec’s economic growth. Enterprises, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in particular, are an engine of economic development. They are recognized as generating a significant share of economic activity and creating employment in communities.

Canada Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec (CED) contributes to the renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec by supporting the emergence of new SMEs and business succession. CED also works to increase the competitiveness of existing enterprises and support their survival by enhancing their performance. CED does so by supporting SMEs that modernize, expand, launch or extend their export activities, reinforce their innovation capability, commercialize, and establish partnerships.

In this program, CED mainly targets enterprises either directty or via non-profit organizations providing support for enterprises and entrepreneurs. CED promotes business development through a grants and contributions program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

Program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 23 (dollars)
Main Estimates
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2015-2016Footnote 24
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
151,677,176 151,677,176 140,314,211 139,815,623
Program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017Footnote 25 2017-2018
136 147 147
Program Performance Measurement
Program 1.1: Business Development
Expected Final ResultFootnote 26 Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed Survival rate after three years of enterprises having received startup support 80% March 31, 2016
Quebec enterprises are competitive Survival rate after three years of enterprises having received development support 95% March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue, under the Business Development program, its financial support for enterprises throughout their life cycle so as to contribute to the renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec and enhance the competitiveness of existing businesses.

CED’s intervention in this program is identified as an organizational priority in 2015 16, and involves promoting the maintenance and growth of business.

By March 31, 2016, CED aims to achieve the following two results through its financial support under this program:

  • 80% of the businesses having received startup support are still operating three years after the funding ends; and
  • 95% of the businesses supported in their development are still operating three years after the funding ends.

In this regard, Statistics Canada concluded in a study carried out in 2013 that enterprises having received support from CED posted a higher average survival rate (85%) than a control group consisting of non-client enterprises (78%), after five years of operation.

2.2.1 Sub-program 1.1.1 – Entrepreneurship Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing the pool of enterprises in Quebec. Entrepreneurial dynamism is lower in Quebec than in the rest of Canada.Footnote 27. CED hopes to boost entrepreneurial dynamism throughout Quebec. It does so by encouraging business pre-startups and startups, and by supporting the survival of existing enterprises through succession planning and business transfers.

In this SP, CED provides support to enterprises or non-profit organizations that support enterprises and entrepreneurs, such as entrepreneurship centres, incubators, and transfer and spinoff organizations. CED contributes to supporting entrepreneurship through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 28 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
22,458,571 20,793,817 20,668,812
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
21 23 23
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate ResultFootnote 29 Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.1.1: Entrepreneurship Support
Enterprises are started up Percentage of enterprises started upFootnote 30 35% March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

The entrepreneurial deficit is a major issue in Quebec, and has an impact on enterprise startups. During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial backing under the Entrepreneurship Support SP in order to enhance entrepreneurial dynamism in Quebec.

CED intends to foster the maintenance and growth of enterprises, one of its priorities for 2015–16, by focussing on projects involving, among other things, the creation and startup of new enterprises.

Through its intervention in this SP, CED estimates that 35% of enterprises supported should have started up two years after the termination of the funding awarded.

2.2.2 Sub-program 1.1.2 – Business Performance

Description

The goal of this sub-program (SP) is to increase Quebec enterprises’ performance and competitiveness. The productivity of the Quebec economy is lower than the average for the rest of Canada,Footnote 31 and productivity gains can be achieved among other things through investment carried out by Quebec enterprises.

In fact, in the context of growing global competition, Quebec enterprises wishing to develop or ensure their survival have to innovate and convert their ideas into business opportunities, enhance their productivity and penetrate new markets.

CED accompanies enterprises from the different regions of Quebec to help them meet these challenges. It does so by encouraging them to invest to optimize their production and increase their efforts with respect to innovation, technology transfer, commercialization and exports. CED also assists in the structuring of business networks in which enterprises operate.

CED’s intervention in this SP is aimed at enterprises and non-profit organizations that support enterprises or entrepreneurs. CED acts on enterprises’ performance through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 32 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
129,218,605 119,520,394 119,146,810
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
115 124 124
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.1.2: Business Performance
Enterprises improve their performance Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue 67% March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial support under the Business Performance SP with a view to sustaining the prosperity and competitiveness of Quebec enterprises. CED’s financial support will enable Quebec enterprises to expand their facilities, optimize their production chains or develop new products, services and processes. Also, the depreciating Canadian dollar could help them increase their market shares outside Canada.

Moreover, in line with its first priority, CED will work to strengthen Quebec SMEs’ capability to take advantage of business opportunities arising from the Government of Canada’s procurement strategies.

CED fosters the maintenance and growth of enterprises, one of its priorities for 2015 16, by focussing on projects associated with, among other things, productivity, expansion, innovation, technology transfer, commercialization or exports.

CED also intends to continue its support for the Canada Business Network (CBN) service centres in Quebec (Info entrepreneurs in Montreal, and Ressources entreprises in Quebec City). These provide information and referral services to guide entrepreneurs toward specialized resources.

Through its action in this SP, CED estimates that 67% of enterprises receiving support should have increased, or at least maintained, their sales or self-generated revenue, two years after the termination of the funding awarded.

2.3 Program 1.2 – Regional Economic Development

Strategic Outcome #1
Quebec's Regions Have A Growing Economy

Program 1.2
Regional Economic Development

Sub-program 1.2.1:
Regional Engagement

Sub-program 1.2.2:
Regional Investment

 

Description

This program (P) is intended to strengthen the regions’ economic base so as to sustain the growth of Quebec’s economy. Quebec’s regions differ in, among other things, their industrial structure, and some are more sensitive to economic fluctuations. Quebec’s prosperity depends on the participation of the different regions in the economy to their full potential.

CED wishes to contribute to building strong and competitive regions. It does so by supporting local communities as they take charge of their economic development and by stimulating investment in all Quebec regions.

In this program, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations active in economic development. CED acts on regional economic development through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial Resources Footnote 33 (dollars)
Main Estimates
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2015-2016Footnote 34
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
35,237,510 35,237,510 32,313,130 32,297,397
Program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
15 17 17
Program Performance Measurement
Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development
Expected Final Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Quebec regions have a stronger economic base. Amount of total investment generated in regions supported that have completed implementation of their development project $14M March 31, 2016
Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported $3.5B March 31, 2016
Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported $900M March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial support to the different regions of Quebec under the Regional Economic Development program so as to strengthen their economic base and contribute to Quebec’s economic growth.

CED wishes to stimulate investment in the regions so as to generate opportunities for development, economic diversification and promotion of regional assets. By March 31, 2016, CED aims to attain the following three targets:

  • the value of investment generated in communities assisted through the implementation of development projects arising from engagement strategies or plans to acquire community economic facilities should total $14 million in 2015–16;
  • the value of spending by tourists from other provinces and outside Canada should reach $3.5 billion in 2015–16; and
  • the value of foreign direct investment by foreign companies and international agencies should hit $900 million in 2015–16. During 2012–13 and 2013–14, the value of such investment reached $2.5 billion, since Quebec had an outstanding year in 2013–14 in terms of attracting foreign investment.

2.3.1 Sub-program 1.2.1 – Regional Engagement

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at supporting local communities as they take charge of their development so as to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions. Local accountability with regard to local economic development and the synergy with which stakeholders interact are success factors in eliciting the establishment of growth-generating projects.

CED sustains the growth and diversification of Quebec communities by supporting engagement and joint action by the various stakeholders, planning of their economic development, canvassing, pursuit of funding and implementation of structuring, recovery or diversification initiatives.

In this SP, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations with an economic role. CED acts on Regional Engagement through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 35 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
3,591,823 3,276,666 3,262,546
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
3 3 3
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.2.1: Regional Engagement
Communities take charge of their economic development Percentage of communities supported which implement engagement projects 50% March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial support under the Regional Engagement SP to engage community economic development agents in a common approach to increasing awareness of the region by developing and implementing engagement projects, such as a diversification or economic recovery strategy.

By March 31, 2016, CED anticipates that 50% of the communities supported in taking charge of their own economic development will be in the process of implementing several projects arising from their plans, studies or engagement strategies.

2.3.2 Sub-program 1.2.2 – Regional Investment

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing investment in the different regions of Quebec so as to strengthen their economic activity base. Quebec’s regions are faced with global competition, and have to compete to attract investment needed to maximize their economic growth.Footnote 36

Quebec must build on its current strengths, such as: access to the North American market, a diversified economy, niches of excellence, skilled workers, an enviable quality of life, abundant resources, distinctive tourism, and more.

CED supports regions in their efforts to acquire the equipment necessary to harness their assets in order to stimulate business and generate economic spinoffs. It also does so by enhancing promotion of regional assets with a view to increasing tourist spending and attraction of foreign direct investment through foreign firms and international organizations.

In this SP, CED focusses on non-profit organizations. CED intervenes in the Regional Investment SP through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 37 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
31,645,687 29,036,464 29,034,851
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
12 14 14
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.2.2: Regional Investment
Quebec regions attract investment Percentage of communities supported which implement community economic facility projects 85% March 31, 2016
Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions 6.5M March 31, 2016
Number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained in or attracted to the regions supported 43 March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial support under the Regional Investment SP in order to contribute to the competitive positioning efforts of Quebec’s different regions, foster increasing international awareness of Quebec’s regional and sectoral assets, and attract new investment.

By March 31, 2016, CED plans to contribute to attainment of the following three targets:

  • 85% of communities receiving support for acquisition of community economic facilities essential for their development will benefit from the completion of their projects;
  • 6.5 million tourists from outside Quebec should visit the different regions of Quebec;Footnote 38 and
  • 43 foreign firms and international agencies should be maintained, expanded or attracted to Quebec.

2.4 Program 1.3 – Strengthening Community Economies

Strategic Outcome #1
Quebec's Regions Have A Growing Economy

Program 1.3
Strengthening Community Economies

Sub-program 1.3.1:
Community Futures Program

Sub-program 1.3.2:
Infrastructure Modernization

Sub-program 1.3.3:
Targeted and/or Temporary Support

 

Description

In addition to its regular programs, CED develops, administers and implements Canada-wide programs or temporary and/or targeted initiatives. The common objective is “Strengthening Community Economies,” in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

CED supports communities’ economic development and ensures sound and effective management of infrastructure programs in Quebec. CED also supports economic activity in Quebec communities that are sustaining economic shocks, experiencing development challenges or where long-term business opportunities exist.

This program (P) is directed at enterprises and non-profit organizations. CED may use dedicated, temporary or permanent additional funding from the Government of Canada, or specific funds allocated, intervening via the QEDP. CED also contributes using a permanent fund dedicated to the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 39 (dollars)
Main Estimates
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2015-2016Footnote 40
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
53,720,902 53,720,902 51,673,326 47,966,263
Program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
36 23 23
Program Performance Measurement
Program 1.3: Strengthening Community Economies
Expected Final Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Quebec communities have stronger economies CFP: Percentage point increase in the survival rate of CFP clients having received assistance over comparable enterprises not having received support 15 percentage points March 31, 2016
Infrastructure Modernization: Amount of total investment generated in communitiesFootnote 42 --- ---
Targeted and/or Temporary Support: Amount of total investment generated in communities $42M March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue, under the Strengthening Community Economies program, its financial support in order to contribute to the prosperity and economic growth of Quebec regions.

CED will continue delivery in Quebec of the Canada-wide program (CFP), four temporary initiativesFootnote 43 and one national initiative,Footnote 44 and will continue to act as Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for the administration in Quebec of the Building Canada Fund (BCF).

The survival rate over five years of CFP clients having received assistance should be at least 15 percentage points higher than of comparable enterprises having received no support in 2015–16 that are part of the control group.

One of CED’s priorities for 2015–16 is to contribute to development of the economy of communities and regions through targeted and/or temporary initiatives, namely:

  • the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic; and
  • the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile.

In 2015–16, the value of investment generated in communities assisted through the strengthening of their economy should total $42 million. Since the number and nature of the initiatives under this sub-program vary from year to year in line with local needs, the total value of investment generated fluctuates accordingly.

2.4.1 Sub-program 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at assisting local economic development in rural areas in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec communities. This SP implements a national program called the Community Futures Program (CFP).

The CFP plays an important role in strengthening the ability of rural communities to diversify their economic base to foster long-term prosperity and sustainability.

By means of the CFP, CED encourages Quebec rural communities’ planning and socio-economic development, access to capital, availability of consulting services and support for local projects.

CED delivers the CFP in Quebec with the help of Community Futures Development Corporations and Business Development Centres, by means of contribution agreements.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 45 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
30,329,464 30,328,604 30,280,263
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
12 12 12
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.3.1: Community Futures Program (CFP)
Communities are economically sustainable Percentage point increase in the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance over comparable enterprises not having received support 7.5 percentage points March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue its financial support under the Community Futures Program SP in order to contribute to strengthening the economy of Quebec’s rural communities.

By March 31, 2016, CED plans to contribute to attaining the following expected result:

  • the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance should be 7.5 percentage points higher than of comparable enterprises not having received support.

2.4.2 Sub-program 1.3.2 – Infrastructure Modernization

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at ensuring sound and effective management of infrastructure programs in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec’s communities. Quality public infrastructure is a key factor in economic development.

CED acts as Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for the administration in Quebec of their different programs, including the Building Canada Fund (Community and Large Urban Centres component).Footnote 46

These grants and contributions programs are the subject of agreements between Infrastructure Canada and the Quebec government and are aimed primarily at municipalities.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 47 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
453,815 453,529 ---
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018Footnote 48
4 4 ---
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Date
Sub-program 1.3.2: Infrastructure Modernization
Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure Number of communities with public infrastructure completed according to the terms of the contribution agreement --- ---

Planning Highlights

During FY 2015–16, CED plans to continue to work with Infrastructure Canada to ensure the implementation in Quebec of the Building Canada Fund Community and Large Urban Centres components so that Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure.

CED is responsible for verifying project compliance with the standards in the Framework Agreements and program terms and conditions. It is also in charge of monitoring the use of funds for the federal government.

Planning highlights and expected results with respect to these programs may be found in Infrastructure Canada’s Report on Plans and Priorities.Footnote 49

2.4.3 Sub-program 1.3.3 – Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at providing targeted and/or temporary support for Quebec communities’ economic activity in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies. The shifting context requires a real-time response that is geared to the most pressing local needs and consistent with specific government priorities.

CED provides support to Quebec communities facing economic shocks, natural disasters or situations that can have an adverse impact on their economic development, and that are facing serious economic development issues or presented with development opportunities likely to have a positive impact on the regions.

This SP is aimed primarily at enterprises and NPOs. CED intervenes through temporary or dedicated additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds allocated by the Agency through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 50 (dollars)
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
22,937,623 20,891,193 17,686,000
Sub-program Human Resources (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
20 7 7
Sub-program Performance Measurement
Expected Intermediate Result Performance Indicator Target Target Attainment Schedule
Sub-program 1.3.3: Targeted and/or Temporary Support
Communities have targeted and/or temporary support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies Number of communities supported receiving targeted and/or temporary supportFootnote 51 60 March 31, 2016

Planning Highlights

For 2015–16, CED intends to continue delivery in the Targeted and/or Temporary Support SP of temporary initiatives and a Canada-wide initiative,Footnote 52 in order to respond in real time to the needs of 60 communities and government priorities with respect to economic development in Quebec in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies.

Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic

  • The initiative aims to support the economic recovery and rebuilding of the town following the rail accident of July 6, 2013;
  • With a $35-million budget envelope, this initiative has three components: rebuilding of the town; direct assistance to enterprises; and creation of two investment funds managed by the local Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC), Société d’aide au développement de la collectivité de la région de Mégantic; and
  • The dedicated team deployed in the field by CED will continue to accompany local agents in their economic development efforts.

Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

  • The initiative aims to accompany communities and enterprises in the Des Appalaches and Des Sources RCMs in their efforts to diversify and strengthen their economic base and thus increase their long-term growth potential;
  • With a $50-million budget envelope, this initiative makes it possible to achieve the Government of Canada’s priority of supporting the economic transition of communities dependent on the chrysotile asbestos industry to the secondary and tertiary sectors; and
  • Meetings to identify and accompany potential clients as well as partners will continue, to support their economic development efforts in the field.

Upgrading of facilities to foster local economic growth

  • As part of its activities under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED funds projects to upgrade local facilities, which contribute to economic activity in and the vitality of small communities.

Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec

  • This initiative aims to prevent the spread of spruce budworm in the Bas-St-Laurent, Gaspésie and Côte-Nord regions, and to support the acquisition of practical knowhow and greater experience in combatting spruce budworm; and
  • With a $6-million envelope, this initiative was launched in May 2014. CED has signed an agreement with the Société de protection des forêts contre les insectes et les maladies for implementation of the initiative.

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018

  • Aims to foster economic development in Quebec’s official language minority communities (OLMCs).

2.5 Program 1.4 – Internal Services

Strategic Outcome #1
Quebec's Regions Have A Growing Economy

Program 1.4
Internal Services

No sub-program

 

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to meet the needs of an organization’s programs and other general obligations. They include: management and monitoring services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; real property services; materiel services; acquisitions management services; and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources directed at the organization as a whole, and not those provided solely to a specific program. They lead to higher efficiency in program delivery, thus contributing to quality services for Canadians.Footnote 53

Program Budgetary Financial ResourcesFootnote 54 (en dollars) (dollars)
Main Estimates
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2015-2016
Planned Spending
2016-2017
Planned Spending
2017-2018
20,446,605 20,446,605 20,314,530 19,725,338
Program Human ResourcesFootnote 55 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018
129 129 129

Planning Highlights

For 2015–16, CED plans to use its Internal Services program to meet the needs of the organization’s programs and its obligations in a continuous improvement perspective. Through this program, CED supports the implementation of numerous government initiatives and facilitates the ownership and integration of these changes within the organization.

In keeping with Government of Canada policy, CED has identified as its third priority its continued modernization, in order to enhance its performance. This priority particularly involves Internal Services.

Examples of initiatives which CED intends to pursue during 2015–16 to support modernization include:

  • Continued implementation of shared operational processes in human resources;
  • Preparation for the migration to the PeopleSoft integrated management system;
  • Continued implementation of electronic document management;
  • Intensified use of social media to maintain contact with economic development organizations and citizens in the interest of communication;
  • Implementation of innovative approaches to information management and information technology, through maximized use of the data warehouse, dashboards and automated reports for decision-making and reporting; and
  • Continued implementation of initiatives deriving from the Destination 2020 exercise, enabling CED to continue building the Public Service of the Future.

Section III - Supplementary Information

3.1 Future-oriented Statement of Operations

The Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of CED’s operations. The forecasted financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, to strengthen accountability and improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the RPP are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts will differ.

A more detailed Future-oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on CED’s website.Footnote 56

Future-oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ending March 31, 2015 (dollars)
Financial Information Expected Results
2014-2015
Planned Results
2015-2016
Difference
Total ExpensesFootnote 57 157,678,000 157,094,000 584,000
Total Revenues 0 0 0
Net Cost of Operations 157,678,000 157,094,000 584,000

In 2015–16, CED’s total net spending should amount to $157 million, down 0.4% from total spending the previous fiscal year.

CED’s forecast expenditures consist largely of transfer payments, that is, expenditures with respect to non-repayable and conditionally repayable contributions. These should total $108.5 million in 2015–16, or 2.8% less than the total anticipated in 2014–15.

Being returned to the Consolidated Revenue Fund, CED’s revenues are declared in its financial statements as having been earned on the Government’s behalf, so the organization’s total net revenues are zero. Note that CED’s total gross revenues are forecast to stand at $708,000 in 2015–16, up 74.4% from FY 2014–15.

3.2 Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–16 can be found on CED’s website.Footnote 58.

3.4 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures, such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in Tax Expenditures and Evaluations.iii. The tax measures presented in that publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV - Organization Contact Information

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec H3B 2T9

CANADA

Telephone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302

Website

Appendix - Definitions

Appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Expenditures
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities.
These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time Equivalent
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-budgetary Expenditures
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance Indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance Reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned Spending
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Results
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset Program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Whole-of-Government Framework
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

i Whole-of-Government Framework.

ii Main Estimates 2015–16.

iii Government of Canada Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

1 See the Justice Canada website.

2 See the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency website.

3 See CED’s website.

4 All audits whose status is “planned” are set out in the plan, but the plan does not specify which RDAs will be audted

Footnotes

Footnote 1

See the Justice Canada website.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

To consult the text of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

The Economic Development Index consists of many variables, such as the participation rate, level of entrepreneurship, level of exporting establishments, value of building permits, diversification of the industrial structure, productivity, and more besides.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories (ETs).

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

To consult the list of CED’s business offices.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Visit CED’s website.

Return to footnote 6 referrer

Footnote 7

CED contributes to the design, administration or implementation in Quebec of nationwide grants and contributions (G&C) programs and temporary initiatives. For further details concerning these programs and initiatives, visit CED’s website. And the supplementary tables on transfer payments.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

For further details on this program, visit the Infrastructure Canada website.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

Note that a grants and contributions (G&C) program or a transfer payment program does not correspond to a program or sub program in the PAA.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Type is defined as follows: previously committed to-committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing-committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new-newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR.

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Desjardins, Economic & Financial Outlook, December 22, 2014.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Between FYs 2013–14 and 2017–18, spending on CED’s regular programs is maintained, while funding for these programs holds steady from year to year. The difference observed in CED’s planned spending from 2015–16 to 2017–18 is primarily attributable to the amount of reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments that is included in planned spending for 2015–16 but not for the following two years, since the authority has not been granted at this stage.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures. Internal services include only operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

The decrease in spending from 2012–13 to 2013–14 with respect to the Strengthening Community Economies program is primarily attributable to the termination of funding for the following temporary initiatives: Thetford Mines Gas Pipeline Program, Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) and Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

Between FYs 2013–14 and 2017–18, spending on CED’s regular programs is maintained, while funding for these programs holds steady from year to year. The difference observed in CED’s planned spending from 2015–16 to 2017–18 is primarily attributable to the amount of reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments that is included in planned spending for 2015–16 but not for the following two years, since the authority has not been obtained at this stage.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

CED’s programs are the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) and the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

A grants and contributions (G&C) program or a transfer payment program does not correspond to a program or sub-program in the PAA.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Expected results targets are established in line with the context of CED’s intervention and its priorities, departmental risks, and resources.

Return to footnote 19 referrer

Footnote 20

The target attainment schedule for CED’s strategic outcome is five years after the QEDP came into effect, that is, the end of FY 2016–17. For the targets presented above, CED will therefore provide the results in its Departmental Performance Report (DPR) 2017–18.

Return to footnote 20 referrer

Footnote 21

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories.

Return to footnote 21 referrer

Footnote 22

Measured by the progression of the economic variables in CED’s economic development index (e.g., participation rate, level of entrepreneurship and exporting establishments, value of building permits, productivity, etc.).

Return to footnote 22 referrer

Footnote 23

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 23 referrer

Footnote 24

Reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments is included in planned spending for 2015–16, but not for FYs 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the Main Estimates for those years have not been authorized at this stage.

Return to footnote 24 referrer

Footnote 25

For FY 2015–16, the Strengthening Community Economies program will be in greater demand, while for the following two years, these resources will be redistributed primarily in the Business Development program. This partly explains the increase in the number of FTEs for this program.

Return to footnote 25 referrer

Footnote 26

Expected final results for all programs correspond to the results obtained in the medium term by projects funded prior to FY 2015–16 which terminated three years after the termination of funding provided by CED.

Return to footnote 26 referrer

Footnote 27

Fondation de l’entrepreneurship (2014), Indice entrepreneurial québécois : Qu’est-ce qui motive nos jeunes à faire le grand saut?(Quebec’s entrepreneurial index: What motivates our young people to take the plunge?), “The percentage of the population expressing their intention of one day creating a new enterprise or taking on an existing one was 19.1% in Quebec and 27.6% in the rest of Canada in 2014.”

Return to footnote 27 referrer

Footnote 28

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 28 referrer

Footnote 29

Expected intermediate results for all sub-programs correspond to the results obtained in the short term by projects funded prior to FY 2015–16 which terminated two years after the termination of funding provided by CED.

Return to footnote 29 referrer

Footnote 30

An enterprise has started up when it has been in operation for at least one year and is generating income amounting to at least 80% of its expenditures.

Return to footnote 30 referrer

Footnote 31

Centre sur la productivité et la prospérité, HEC Montréal (2014), Productivity and Prosperity in Quebec: 2014 Overview.
“ Labour productivity, which measures the value of the wealth created per hour worked, was $55.40 in Quebec, and $61.44 in Canada in 2013. Average annual labour productivity growth was 1.04% in Quebec and 1.18% in Canada between 1981 and 2013.”

Return to footnote 31 referrer

Footnote 32

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 32 referrer

Footnote 33

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 33 referrer

Footnote 34

Reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments is included in planned spending for 2015–16, but not for FYs 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the Main Estimates for those years have not been authorized at this stage.

Return to footnote 34 referrer

Footnote 35

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 35 referrer

Footnote 36

Centre sur la productivité et la prospérité, HEC Montréal (2010), Ouverture aux investissements directs étrangers et productivité au Canada (Openness to Foreign Direct Investment and Productivity in Canada).

Return to footnote 36 referrer

Footnote 37

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 37 referrer

Footnote 38

See the Tourisme Québec website.

Return to footnote 38 referrer

Footnote 39

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 39 referrer

Footnote 40

Reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments is included in planned spending for 2015–16, but not for FYs 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the Main Estimates for those years have not been authorized at this stage.

Return to footnote 40 referrer

Footnote 41

The financial profile presented reflects the implementation of current and potential projects under temporary initiatives.

Return to footnote 41 referrer

Footnote 42

Expected results with respect to this program appear in Infrastructure Canada’s Report on Plans and Priorities.

Return to footnote 42 referrer

Footnote 43

Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec and Local Investment Initiative (LII).

Return to footnote 43 referrer

Footnote 44

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (2013–2018).

Return to footnote 44 referrer

Footnote 45

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 45 referrer

Footnote 46

CED is responsible for monitoring the use of funds on behalf of the federal government. It is also in charge of verifying project compliance with the standards in the signed Framework Agreements and program terms and conditions.

Return to footnote 46 referrer

Footnote 47

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to footnote 47 referrer

Footnote 48

Funding provided by Infrastructure Canada for projects through the Building Canada Fund and core funding for provinces and territories will terminate effective FY 2017–18.

Return to footnote 48 referrer

Footnote 49

See Infrastructure Canada’s website.

Return to footnote 49 referrer

Footnote 50

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 50 referrer

Footnote 51

For further details concerning the Canada-wide EDI initiative and temporary initiatives, see CED’s website.

Return to footnote 51 referrer

Footnote 52

The ongoing Canada-wide initiative in 2015–16 is the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018.

Return to footnote 52 referrer

Footnote 53

Since April 1, 2014, the deputy heads of the regional development agencies have undertaken the responsibilities of the federal councils in their respective regions. CED’s Deputy Minister/President chairs the Quebec Federal Council (QFC). Two FTEs are associated with the office of the QFC.

Return to footnote 53 referrer

Footnote 54

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to footnote 54 referrer

Footnote 55

The planned FTEs in the Internal Services program are broken down according to the definition of internal services provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat in the Profile of Government of Canada Internal Services. As agreed with the TBS, however, CED’s Management and Monitoring Services group, as with Canada’s other regional development agencies, excludes design and management of programs, policies, standards and guidelines, and government relations. The resources allocated to those services are therefore broken down among CED’s other programs and sub-programs.

Return to footnote 55 referrer

Footnote 56

See CED’s website.

Return to footnote 56 referrer

Footnote 57

Expenses reflect the economic resources used by CED during a period to deliver the programs in its PAA, and are of two types: (i) transfer payments; and (ii) operating expenses. Expenses calculated in the context of the Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Section III) differ from those presented in sections I and II of the RPP, since unconditionally repayable contributions are not accounted for as loans, thus reducing total transfer payment expenses.

Return to footnote 57 referrer

Footnote 58

See CED’s website.

Return to footnote 58 referrer

 

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables in the Report on Plans and Priorities 2015–16 are available on the CED website.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPP)

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

2. Implementation Date: April 1, 2012

3. Termination Date: Permanent

4. Fiscal Year for Application of Terms and Conditions: N/A

5. Strategic Outcome: Quebec regions have a growing economy.

6. Link to Program Alignment Architecture: The QEDP comprises three programs and five sub-programs, which are presented in detail in Section 8 "Expected Results."

7. Description: The QEDP contributes to promoting the long-term economic development of Quebec’s regions by paying special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

8. Expected Results:

Program 1.1 – Business Development:

Program 1.2 – Regional Economic Development:

Program 1.3 – Strengthening of Community Economies:

9. Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: The QEDP came into effect on April 1, 2012, so no evaluation has been completed to date.

10. Decision Following Results of Last Evaluation: N/A

11. Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016-2017

12. General Targeted Recipient Group: The main recipients of the QEDP are small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), business groups or associations and non-profit organizations (NPOs) whose principal mission is to support businesses or economic development. The QEDP also supports asset-operating organizations, organizations and institutions dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of knowledge, such as universities and teaching institutions, the Quebec government, municipalities and municipal organizations.

13. Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: A communication plan aimed at informing the public, SMEs and economic development agents in the regions of Quebec of the creation and implementation of the QEDP by CED has been drawn up, and its implementation is ongoing. Communications products have also been developed to publicize the simplified program.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (in dollars)
  14.
Forecast Spending
2014-2015
15.
Planned Spending
2015-2016
16.
Planned Spending
2016-2017
17.
Planned Spending
2017-2018
Grants 1,650,000 1,650,000 1,650,000 1,650,000
Contributions 181,550,033 187,377,783 171,05,5978 167,571,796
Other Types of Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0
Total Transfer Payments 183,200,033 189,027,783 172,705,978 169,221,796

1. Name of Transfer Payment Program: Community Futures Program (CFP)

2. Implementation Date: May 18, 1995

3. Termination Date: Permanent

4. Fiscal Year for Application of Terms and Conditions: N/A

5. Strategic Outcome: Quebec regions have a growing economy.

6. Link to Program Alignment Architecture:
The CFP corresponds to a sub-program:
1.3.1. Community Futures Program.

7. Description: This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

8. Expected Result: Communities are economically sustainable (result measured by the percentage points by which the growth in sales of CFP-assisted clients exceeds that of comparable unassisted firms).

9. Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: The evaluation of the CFP, in order to evaluate its timeliness and performance, was completed in 2009–10.

10. Decision Following Results of Last Evaluation: Following the evaluation of the CFP, it was decided to continue this program.

11. Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: CED will complete the evaluation of the CFP in 2015–16.

12. General Targeted Recipient Group: In Quebec, the CFP provides financial support for community development organizations, such as the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

13. Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: A strategic communications plan has been drawn up for the CFP, with a view in particular to informing community development organizations and economic development stakeholders of the ongoing support offered by the Government of Canada through this program. Indeed, the ongoing federal support associated with the CFP was announced in Budget 2010.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (in dollars)
  14.
Forecast Spending
2014-2015
15.
Planned Spending
2015-2016
16.
Planned Spending
2016-2017
17.
Planned Spending
2017-2018
Grants 0 0 0 0
Contributions 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,968,018
Other Types of Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0
Total Transfer Payments 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,968,018

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the federal government’s approach to sustainable development

The 2013–2016 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In line with the objectives of the Act, which are to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) supports implementation of the FSDA through activities listed in this supplementary information table.

The Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the contributions and expected results for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality.

2. Themes I to III: Department-led Targets

CED leads no FSDS targets.

3. Themes I to III: CED’s Implementation Strategies

The DSDS is implemented through CED’s regular grants and contributions (G&C) program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP). Through this G&C program, CED supports the development of businesses and regions and the strengthening of communities.

As shown in the table below, CED’s activities related to Theme I of the FSDS come under the Business Development program in the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA).

Strategic Outcome PAA Program Sub-program
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy Business Development (1.1)
  • Support for entrepreneurship (1.1.1)
  • Enterprises’ performance (1.1.2)

Under Theme I, CED undertakes, within the framework of the FSDS 2013–2016, to finance projects that could, among other things, help optimize resource use, value residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency. For example, CED supports industrial greening projects (e.g., eco-design, eco-efficiency, green energy pathways, green buildings) that enable businesses to meet new requirements (e.g., eco-certification), identify ways to improve environmental performance and seize market opportunities in emerging green sectors. Supporting the shift to a greener economy, which provides development opportunities for businesses, allows CED to promote economic development.

FSDS Implementation Strategy and Targets

CED’s commitment to finance projects that could, among other things, help optimize resource use, value residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency is in line with FSDS Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality. Meeting this commitment should contribute to achieving FSDS targets 1.1 (Climate Change Mitigation) and 2.1 (Air Pollutants). CED’s grants and contributions management system is designed to gather information on projects which help attain these objectives.

Activities Planned to Foster Implementation of the DSDS

In order to implement the DSDS, CED will continue carrying out the following activities:

Information (Internal to CED)

Co-ordination and Liaison

Reporting

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA), 2012

Communication

Anticipated Results for 2015–16

The table below shows CED’s targeted results, performance indicators and targets, as well as emphasizing their links to FSDS targets. The chosen benchmark year is 2013–14, in order to establish the new targets, since the FSDS 2013–2016 came into effect during that year. The targets could be reviewed once the FSDS 2016–2019 comes into effect.

CED’s sustainable development performance measurement is confined strictly to the Business Development program in the PAA.

Targeted Result Performance Indicator Target Contribution to an FSDS Target
Businesses are started up or transferred in a sustainable development perspective Percentage of businesses undergoing startup or transfer in a sustainable development perspective (out of the total number of businesses undergoing startup or transfer) 15%

Climate Change Mitigation

Air Pollutants

Businesses improve their performance in a sustainable development perspective Percentage of businesses aiming to improve their performance in a sustainable development perspective (out of the total number of businesses aiming to improve their performance) 10%

Climate Change Mitigation

Air Pollutants

4. Theme IV: Implementation Targets and Strategies

Goal 7: Waste and Asset Management

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, each Department will apply a green procurement procedure that will accelerate implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement.

Performance Measurement

Expected Result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place (as of April 1, 2014).

Yes
Planned completion date: March 31, 2015

Number and percentage of specialists in procurement or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course (C215) or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Number: 6 (100%)

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

Number: 6 (100%)

 

Departmental Green Procurement Target

By March 31, 2017, 90% of imaging hardware purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of this hardware.

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Dollar value or volume of imaging hardware purchases that meet the target objective as a percentage of the total dollar value or volume of all imaging hardware purchases in the year in question.

Percentage: 90%

 

By March 31, 2017, 95% of copy paper, commercial printing, and/or envelope purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of the production.

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Dollar value or volume of copy paper, commercial printing and/or envelope purchases that meet the target objective as a percentage of the total dollar value or volume of all copy paper, commercial printing and/or envelope purchases in the year in question.

Percentage: 95%

 

By March 31, 2017, 90% of toner cartridges will be recycled at end of life.

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Number of toner cartridges recycled as a percentage of the total volume of all toner cartridges purchased in the year in question.

Percentage: 90%

 

Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice

Performance Target

7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.

Achieved

7.2.3. Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.

Achieved

 

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Performance Measurement

Planned Outcome

Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

A departmental approach in order to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace is in place by March 31, 2015.

Yes
Planned completion date: March 31, 2015

Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice

Performance Target

7.3.1.3. Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).

Achieved

7.3.1.5. Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.

Achieved

7.3.1.6. Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Achieved

7.3.1.7. Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.

Achieved

 

5. Departmental Additional Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

All CED’s sustainable development activities and initiatives are indicated in the above strategy.

6. Sustainable Development Management System

CED’s Vision and Mandate Concerning Sustainable Development

CED accepts the basic principle, set out in the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA), that “sustainable development is based on an ecologically efficient use of natural, social and economic resources and acknowledges the need to integrate environmental, economic and social factors in the making of all decisions by government.”

CED’s vision: In the long term, Quebec’s regions and communities will have increased their development capacity, vitality and prosperity in sustainable, meaningful terms, for the benefit of citizens.

As part of its mission to promote the long-term economic development of Quebec regions, CED is committed, under Theme I of the FSDS, to:

CED is also involved in implementation of Theme IV of the FSDS: Shrinking the environmental footprint – Beginning with government, which addresses the greening of government operations. CED’s commitments under Theme IV are covered in detail in its Greening Government Operations supplementary table.

CED’s Sustainable Development Management System

Responsibility for managing sustainable development is shared among CED’s different committees and sectors.

Executive Committee
The Executive Committee, chaired by CED’s Deputy Minister/President, is responsible for collectively managing all CED activities and advising her on policy and management issues.

Program Management Committee
The Program Management Committee is chaired by the Director General, Policy, Research and Programs Branch (PRPB). Its mandate includes optimizing program performance and guiding CED in intervention analysis, performance measurement, and program evaluation, while ensuring consistency and integration of the relevant information. This committee is also involved in drawing up Reports on Plans and Priorities and Departmental Performance Reports, in which the DSDS is integrated in the form of a supplementary table.

Policy and Communications Sector
Within the Policy and Communications Sector, the Policy, Research and Programs Branch (PRPB) and the Communications Directorate have responsibilities with respect to sustainable development.

The PRPB:

The Communications Directorate:

Operations Sector

This Sector is responsible for implementing CED’s programs. It includes a network of business offices across Quebec, and contributes to implementation of the DSDS. More specifically, this Sector:

Corporate Services Sector
This Sector:

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

Strategic Environmental Assessment and the FSDS

CED ensures that its decision-making process includes a consideration of FSDS goals and targets through strategic environmental assessment (SEA). An SEA of policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impact of the proposals on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets. SEA findings are made public when an initiative is announced or approved, to demonstrate that environmental factors were integrated into the decision-making process.

Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals

Pursuant to this directive, the policy, plan and program proposals of departments and agencies have to take any potential environmental effects into account. More specifically, a strategic environmental assessment of a policy, plan or program proposal has to be conducted when the following two conditions are met:

Strategic Environmental Assessment of CED

In 2012, CED conducted a strategic environmental assessment of the Quebec Economic Development Program and an update in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA)1 and the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.2. This assessment concluded that the program’s implementation was not likely to generate significant environmental effects, provided CEAA 2012 is applied to supported projects.

CED will continue to ensure that the decision-making process takes FSDS goals and targets into account in the SEA process. An SEA of policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impact of the proposals on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets. The findings of CED’s detailed assessment are released when an initiative is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to show that the environmental effects, including the impact on the attainment of FSDS goals and targets, of approved policies, plans or programs were taken into consideration appropriately in the preparation of the proposal and the decision-making process.

Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations (next three fiscal years)

A. Upcoming Internal Audits (next three fiscal years)

A service agreement was established between the Internal Audit Sector of the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada (OCG) and Canada’s regional development agencies (RDAs), including CED. This agreement came into effect on April 1, 2012, and describes the internal audit services provided to RDAs by the OCG.

Completed audit reports concerning CED will be accessible on its website.3.

Name of Internal Audit4 Type of Internal Audit Status Expected Completion Date
2015-2016
Horizontal internal audit of information security in large and small departments

Security Management

Information Technology

In progress June 2015
Audit of third-party delivery arrangements signed with RDAs Transfer Payment Programs Planned September 2015
Audit of the common grants and contributions process initiative for RDAs – Phase 1: Project management Transfer Payment Programs Planned March 2016
2016-2017
Horizontal internal audit of information management in large and small departments

Security Management

Information Technology

Planned September 2016
Horizontal internal audit of activity continuity planning in large and small departments

Security Management

Information Technology

Planned September 2016
2017-2018
Audit of certain RDA information management sectors Internal Services Planned September 2017
Horizontal internal audit of information technology security in large and small departments – Phase 2

Security Management

Information Technology

Planned September 2017

B. Upcoming Evaluations (next three fiscal years)

Link to Program Alignment Architecture Name of Evaluation Planned Evaluation Start Date Planned Date of Approval from Deputy Head
Sub-program 1.3.3:
Ad-hoc or targeted support
Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) December 2014 March 2016
Sub-program 1.1.1: Support for entrepreneurship
Sub-program 1.1.2: Enterprises’ performance
Sub-program 1.2.1: Mobilization of regions
Sub-program 1.2.2: Investment in the regions
Sub-program 1.3.3: Ad-hoc or targeted support
Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) April 2014 March 2017
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