2016-17 Departmental Results Report

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

ISSN number : 2561-0015

Catalog number : Iu90-1/16E-PDF

Publish date : November 9, 2017

Summary :

This report deals with Canada Economic Development's principal achievements in regards to its engagements towards the Parliament.

Table of Contents

  1. Minister’s message
  2. Deputy Head’s message
  3. Results at a glance
  4. Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do
  5. Operating context and key risks
  6. Results: what we achieved
  7. Analysis of trends in spending and human resources
  8. Additional information
  9. Appendix: Definitions
  10. Endnotes
  11. Supplementary information tables
  12. Methodology and Technical Notes on Performance Data

Minister’s message

I am pleased to report progress made on making Canada a world-leading centre for science and innovation, helping create good, well-paying jobs, and strengthening and growing the middle class.

The work of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio includes promoting science and innovation; supporting the commercialization of more research and ideas; providing more Canadians with the skills to participate in a global and digital economy; helping small businesses grow through innovation, access to capital and trade; promoting increased tourism in Canada; and supporting scientific research and the integration of scientific considerations in our investment and policy choices.

This year, the Portfolio organizations continued their work to deliver on the Government’s Budget 2017 commitment to develop an Innovation and Skills Plan. The plan’s focus on people and addressing the changing nature of the economy is a focus for the Portfolio’s programs.

Implementing its renewed vision for the economic development of Quebec regions, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions has made a significant contribution to achieving the Portfolio’s objectives by helping businesses and communities grow, innovate and export their products so they can create quality jobs and ensure the prosperity of Canadians.

It is my pleasure to present the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions.

L’honorable Navdeep Bains
The Honourable Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science and
Economic Development

Deputy Head’s message

Manon BrassardThe Departmental Results Report (DRR) for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) looks at how far we have come in one year and reviews progress against expected outcomes in the 2016–2017 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

The reader will find that CED’s priorities are based on economic challenges facing the Quebec regions and that they are aligned with those of the Government of Canada, notably with respect to innovation, clean technology and opportunities for Indigenous peoples. CED will also actively participate in the delivery of the Government of Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan.

In its 2016–2017 RPP, CED focused on three innovation-related priorities: supporting business expansion, innovation and exports; supporting the economic diversification and transition of communities by building on their competitive advantages; and building on CED’s culture of innovation to enhance its performance. The departmental results in this report demonstrate the efforts that have been made in this regard.

Through its programs, initiatives and field interventions, CED is the key federal player in the economic development of the Quebec regions. In May 2017, following a year-long process of consultation and engagement with experts and stakeholders from various backgrounds and from all regions, CED launched its Strategic Plan 2021, which seeks a more innovative, clean and inclusive Quebec economy.

The Plan, which has contributed to creating intervention strategies tailored to Quebec’s various regions, is based on four primary areas: innovation, clean growth, economic diversification and Indigenous peoples. CED is prioritizing and pursuing projects and interventions to implement this vision.

The report illustrates CED’s support for the government’s commitment to provide Parliament and Canadians with simplified and transparent accountability tools. The DRR has therefore replaced the Departmental Performance Report (DPR) while the RPP has been replaced with the Departmental Plan (DP). This DRR, which covers the period ending March 31, 2017, clearly and concisely lays out CED’s objectives as well as progress made over the previous fiscal year.

Manon Brassard
Deputy Minister / President of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Results at a glance

Funds Used
(Actual Spending 2016–2017)
Personnel
(Full-time Equivalents [FTEs] 2016–2017)
315,952,633 330

Key results in 2016–2017

For more information on the department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED)’s mission is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate”Footnote i.

Mandate and role

CED is one of the regional development agencies (RDA) that make up the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio. Quebec communities and SMEs are at the very heart of its activities. Through the projects it funds and its networking and integration role, CED is the key federal actor in the Quebec entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Project funding

With its business development knowledge and experience, CED maintains client relations with businesses and supports them in their projects. It makes strategic investments that promote competitive regional advantages and support the transition and modernization of communities. Aiming to position Quebec businesses at the leading edge of tomorrow’s economy, CED focuses on business growth, innovation, clean technologies, the growth of an inclusive economy and the participation of Indigenous peoples.

Networking

Well rooted in the regions thanks to its 12 business offices, CED builds on collaboration and creating synergies with businesses, communities, supporting organizations and other levels of government to increase the quality and impact of its programs. For example, it forms partnerships to foster a concerted action by regional economic development actors and ensures a better exchange of information between federal organizations.

CED provides a regional strategic perspective that supports national priorities and works with other departments to ensure coordination of government policies and programs. Its action has a significant impact on Quebec communities and businesses, not only through its direct investments, but also because it contributes to understanding the economic development needs of the regions.

Grants and contributions programs and initiatives in effect in 2016–2017

Main program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

  • Temporary and/or targeted Initiatives
    • Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic
    • Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec (SICSBOQ)
    • Extension of the Natural Gas Distribution Network Between Lévis and Sainte-Claire (Bellechasse Gas Pipeline)
    • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) [Canada-wide initiative]
    • Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP 150) [Canada-wide initiative]

National Program

  • Community Futures Program (CFP)

Infrastructure Programs

  • Building Canada Fund–Quebec (BCF-Q)

CED’s main grants and contributions program, the QEDP, came into effect on April 1, 2012. The program’s main beneficiaries are SMEs, business groups or associations and non-profit organizations (NPOs) whose principal mission is to support businesses or economic development.

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.Footnote ii

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Economic context

Economic growth in Canada only picked up slightly in 2016, but strengthened in Quebec. This economic uptick–propelled by the vitality of metropolitan Montréal–can be explained in part by an increase in infrastructure investment, strong job creation and increased household spending, stimulated by a historically low unemployment rate.Footnote iiiIn its annual report, the Institut du Québec (IDQ) also points out that 2016 has proved to be one of the best in the past 10 years with over 89,500 jobs created, mainly full-time and in the private sectorFootnote iv.

Despite Quebec’s relatively good performance, the province is still lagging in terms of per capita disposable income, and the gap with other provinces has grown wider in recent years. Other issues and challenges arise in Quebec’s economy: declining exports of goods and services; low productivity growth; entrepreneurial deficit; new e-commerce paradigms and importance to accelerate the digital shift for many businesses; and limited growth opportunities in some remote communities.

Indeed, many communities located far from urban centres have insufficiently diversified economies and rely on a single sector, whether it be natural resource development or tourism. These communities are therefore more sensitive to economic fluctuations.

Government context

Several changes were made to the federal administration to reflect new government priorities. CED is actively contributing to the delivery of several of them, including Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan. CED is also adapting to several new Treasury Board Secretariat policies, including the Policy on Results and the financial management policies, designed to improve communication to Canadians and reduce the administrative burden.

CED has also implemented several internal changes in the perspective of modernization, optimization of processes and improvement of customer experience. For example, the organization is actively contributing to the development of a new government-wide grants and contributions management system. It is also planning the renewal of several leases and relocation of a number of its offices. This significant wave of change has exerted some pressure on CED’s financial and human resources.

Key risks

The following table outlines the external risk that CED faced as well as the mitigation strategies implemented in 2016–2017.

Effective mitigation measures allowed CED to adapt its actions to an evolving economic context and to further government priorities and achieve targeted outcomes.

Key risks

Risk

Mitigating Strategy and effectiveness

Link to the department’s Programs

Link to mandate Letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities

Economic Risk and Institutional Capacity

The economic context and the many changes within organizations and in the support structure for regional economic development may jeopardize government priorities delivery and achievement of CED program results.

  • Continuous monitoring of the context and support structure for regional economic development and impact analysis to adjust program delivery, as required.
  • Renewal of CED’s strategic directions (Strategic Plan 2021) to align both with government priorities and with economic development needs identified through consultations.
  • Update regional intervention strategies carried out by CED’s business offices and implement the new priorities of the Strategic Plan 2021.

Program 1.1:
Business Development

Program 1.2:
Regional Economic Development

Program 1.3:
Strengthening Community Economies

  • Contribute to the delivery of Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan.
  • Make investments to support transition and diversification in communities.
  • Help businesses to grow, innovate and export their products.
  • Make strategic investments in the clean technology sector.
  • Promote economic development and create jobs for Indigenous peoples.

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Program 1.1 – Business Development

Description

This program is designed to support the development of Quebec businesses throughout their life cycle. Businesses–particularly SMEs–, drive economic development and are known for generating significant economic activity and for creating jobs in communities.

CED contributes to the renewal of the Quebec business pool by supporting business succession and the emergence of new businesses. It also helps to enhance the competitiveness of existing businesses and to support their sustainability by improving their performance through the development of their production, innovation, marketing and export capabilities.

In this program, CED mainly targets businesses directly or through NPOs that support them. It promotes business development through its grants and contributions program: the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

Results

As the Results Achieved table below shows, CED met the expected outcomes and contributed to the renewal of Quebec’s pool of businesses and to improving the competitiveness of existing ones.

During the period under review, CED funded 125 projects aiming to Support entrepreneurship ($18M) and 636 to Enhance the performance of Existing Enterprises ($143M). On the whole, the results were satisfactory:

Highlights

94% of promoters who received business creation and startup support stated that their project created new jobs, with an average of 12 new jobs created per project.Footnote v.

Most SMEs supported by CED work in the manufacturing sector, which faces ongoing challenges. Funded projects specifically focus on increasing SMEs’ innovation, competitiveness and productivity, especially as the context of a weak Canadian dollar reduces their purchasing power abroad. CED’s financial support is thus intended to position these SMEs at the forefront of tomorrow’s economy, for example by assisting them in making the shift to digital.

Example of a Business Support Project

B-CITI, in partnership with a group of researchers from the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), the city of Brossard and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada, developed the B-CITI Intelligent Resident Platform.

B-CITI brings cities closer to their residents. It is an integrated intelligent multi-modal/multi-channel platform: B-CITI connects systems, centralizes and cleans data, digitizes resident services and provides real-time analytics dashboards. Citizens can contact and interact with their city from this portal, accessible on any digital device.

CED’s support enabled the implementation of a marketing strategy for the Canadian and international markets.

Example of a Business Performance Project

Cordé Électrique, a manufacturing company located in Eastern Townships, received funding to improve its performance by increasing its productivity and manufacturing capacity. The project also aims to implement a marketing plan for the U.S. market.

CED’s support helped improve the company’s production chain by acquiring state-of-the-art equipment and by expanding the plant. The company has also created new jobs, going from 45 to more than 70 employees since the project began.

Winner of the Accroissement de la productivité (productivity growth) award at the 2017 Mercuriades, Cordé Électrique specializes in small- and medium-sized personalized batches of electrical harnesses, as well as prototype, moulding, wire printing, technical support and cost reduction analysis services. The company generates most of its revenue from transport and recreational products.

The impact of CED’s intervention in this program is significant. According to a telephone survey conducted in 2016,Footnotevi the majority of respondents (58%) who participated in the Business Development Program stated that they would not have been able to carry out their project without CED’s assistance. Of those who would have completed their project, only 10% stated that they would have done so on the same scale and within the same timeframe.

With respect to budgetary financial resources, CED reallocated resources among its various programs—in compliance with departmental authorities—in order to adjust to the realities of Quebec businesses and regions. As a result, a one-time increase in actual versus planned spending was reported for the Business Development Program.

Results achieved
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016-17 Actual Results 2015–16 Actual Results 2014–15 Actual Results
The pool of businesses in Quebec is renewed. Survival rate of businesses supported in their startup. 90% March 31, 2017 87% 94% 84%
Quebec businesses are competitive. Survival rate of businesses supported in their development. 95% March 31, 2017 100% 99% 96%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned Spending
2016–17
Total Authorities Available for Use
2016–17
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
2016–17
Variance
(Actual minus Planned)
158,796,744 158,796,744 159,007,337 176,315,687 17,518,943
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17 Planned 2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
124 122 -2

Information on CED’s lower-level programs is available on CED’s website and in the TBS InfoBase.Footnote vii

Program 1.2 – Regional Economic Development

Description

This program is intended to strengthen the regions’ economic base so as to sustain Quebec’s economic growth. Quebec’s regions differ in, among other things, their industrial structure, and some are more sensitive to economic fluctuations than others. Quebec’s prosperity depends on the different regions participating in the economy to their full potential. CED contributes to building strong, competitive regions, and does so by supporting local communities as they take charge of their economic development and by stimulating investment in all Quebec regions.

Under this program, CED intervenes primarily through NPOs active in economic development and through the QEDP.

Results

CED exceeded the targets set for two of the three performance indicators for strengthening the economic base of Quebec’s regions. Only the investments generated in regions that have completed implementation of a development project are below the target, the three projects completed under the component “prepare a development strategy” having generated total investments of $2.5 million in Montreal and Sept-Îles. The small difference for this indicator may be attributed to delays in implementing projects aiming to “equip the region with a community economic facility”. Indeed, several large-scale projects under way will see their end date–and results–reported next fiscal year.

Highlights

CED provided more than $33 M in grants and contributions for 98 projects supporting regional economic development and strengthening the ability of communities to achieve their full potential in a sustainable way.

Regional Investment Project

The non-profit Corporation événements d'hiver de Québec (QCCA) is responsible for the Snowboard Jamboree (SBJ). This sporting event is part of the International Ski Federation's (FIS) calendar, attracts top international athlètes–with 30 countries represented–and rays in about 120 countries.

The project promoted the 2017 edition of the event nationally and internationally, generating positive economic, tourist, media and environmental benefits for Québec city as well as the Quebec region.

Example of a Regional Engagement Project

CED’ financing enabled the Îles-de-la-Madeleine municipality to develop an economic diversification plan and carry out a socio-economic portrait of the archipelago, a Strengths Weaknesses Opportunity Threats assessment and an analysis of opportunities based on an online survey and a focus group with various economic stakeholders.

Three priority areas were identified: economic opportunities for a waste diversion project; development of a business accelerator with access to logistical and technical support; and development and implementation of a strategy to attract investment and entrepreneurs.

The economic diversification plant is part of the Horizon 2025 Program directions. The program, which the community adopted in 2013, provides a shared vision of development and reflects the archipelago’s characteristics.

Without CED’s assistance, most of the economic development projects in the regions could not have been carried out. That is what stated 84% of clients funded in this program and who responded to the telephone survey mentioned above. Only 2% of them would have carried out their projects in the same time and to the same extent.

The majority of respondents also stated that their project enabled implementation of structuring projects and engaged key stakeholders. Some of the results mentioned include establishing networks outside the region and in the U.S., creating businesses and jobs in the region, or revitalizing a city and diversifying its economy through the creation of new businesses and permanent jobs and significant infrastructure investments.

With respect to budgetary financial resources, CED reallocated resources among its various programs—in compliance with departmental authorities—in order to adjust to the realities of Quebec businesses and regions. As a result, a one-time increase in actual versus planned spending was reported for the Regional Economic Development Program.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2015–16 Actual
results
2014–15 Actual
results
The Quebec regions have a strengthened economic base. Total amount of investment generated in supported regions that completed implementation of their development project. $3M March 31, 2017 $2.5M $25M $64.2M
Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to supported regions. $3.6B March 31, 2017 $4.2B $3.8B $10.2B
Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to supported regions. $1.3B March 31, 2017 $1.76B $1.7B $3.7B
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
38,450,858 38,450,858 38,516,354 35,198,143 -3,252,715
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
21 21 0

Information on CED’s lower-level programs is available on CED’s website and in the TBS InfoBase.Footnote viii.

Program 1.3 – Strengthening Community Economies

Description

In addition to its regular programs, CED develops, administers and implements Canada-wide programs or temporary and/or targeted initiatives. The common objective throughout is to strengthen community economies in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth. CED thus supports communities’ economic development. CED also supports economic activity in Quebec communities that are undergoing economic shocks, experiencing significant development challenges or gasping long-term business opportunities.

This program targets businesses and non-profit organizations. CED uses dedicated temporary or permanent additional funding from the Government of Canada, or specific funds which it allocates via the QEDP. It also intervenes by means of a permanent fund dedicated to the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Results

Results for the survival rate of CFP-assisted businesses are satisfactory. Targets were surpassed, survival rates for businesses that received support rising up to 80%, compared with 52% for the comparison group. CED also provided financial support for 57 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) located in designated rural regions and 10 Business Development Centres (BDCs) in peri-urban regions.

The six temporary and/or targeted initiatives deliveredFootnote ix through the QDEP supported 314 projects in 92 individual communities out of 104 communities in Quebec. However, results for total investments generated in the communities were less satisfactory, as some projects experienced implementation delays. CED relies on promoters’ efforts to implement their projects, and some promoters who are responsible for large-scale projects will finalize their projects in 2017–2018 rather than 2016–2017, which explains some of the discrepancies in the anticipated results.

Mid-term evaluations of the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic and the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile confirm the need for intervention as well as the relevance of these initiatives, their alignment with priorities and their complementarity with programs of other stakeholders. Few projects supported by CED were completed at the time of the evaluations, but the preliminary results are positive. The presence of a dedicated team for these two initiatives has resulted in a positive partnership which partners described as “excellent”.

Highlights

The latest Statistics Canada study on the CFPs’ performance shows that businesses funded by CFDCs and BDCs have a better survival rate, create more jobs and increase their payroll and sales faster than a group of similar companiesFootnote x.

Example of a Project Regarding Temporary and/or Targeted Support – Economic Development Initiative

CED provided funding to the Secretariat to the Cree Nation Abitibi-Témiscamingue Economic Alliance (SCNATEA) to support targeted business networking interventions, responding to the growing interest in Aboriginal peoples, non-Aboriginals and Inuit in Anglophone communities. The mission of the NPO is to promote sustainable relations and socio-economic alliances between the Cree Nation (Eeyou Istchee), Jamésie, Abitibi-Témiscamingue and Nunavik.

The project enabled the realization of several projects, including the 13th edition of the “networking day”. The event, which brought together more than 250 participants and 170 companies and organizations, helped identify new business opportunities, new partnerships and develop business networks. A conference in the Cree community of Mistissini was also held with themes on tourism, mining development in the Nord-du-Québec region and economic development.

Example of a Project Regarding Temporary and/or Targeted Support – Economic Diversification of Quebec Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

BXA specializes in the development of processes and equipment for treating secondary sludge generated by industrial, agri-food and municipal activities.

The company has developed a technology that significantly reduces the volume of industrial sludge. This innovation is expected to lower transport and disposal costs, reduce the presence of bacteria and coliforms and control odour for sludge so it can be reused in agriculture.

CED’s support enabled the company to complete the pilot phase of the project to develop a prototype of an electric biological sludge processor. At the time of writing, the company was beginning its marketing efforts.

In 2016–2017, CED carried out an evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE). Two key findings emerge from this evaluation. The first finding points to the need for CED’s assistance in communities affected by an economic crisis. In vulnerable and often mono-industrial communities, lack of funding leads to significant job losses, and CED’s funding helped to stabilize the situation. The second finding highlights that economic diversification takes time to materialize. CED should therefore seek to establish a sufficiently long period for new initiatives to reflect the long-term nature of some expected deliverables.

With respect to budgetary financial resources, CED reallocated resources among its various programs—in compliance with departmental authorities—in order to adjust to the realities of Quebec businesses and regions. As a result, a one-time increase in actual versus planned spending was reported for the Strengthening Community Economies Program.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
2014–15
Actual results
Quebec communities have strengthened economies. Percentage point increase in the survival rate of CFP clients that received assistance over the rate of comparable enterprises that did not receive support. 15 percentage points March 31, 2017 28 percentage points 26 percentage points $730.4M
Total amount of investment generated in communities for infrastructure modernization N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Total amount of investment generated in communities for temporary and/or targeted support. $170M March 31, 2017 $110.8M $48.9M $6.9M (EDI)
$15.1M (Chrysotile
) $18.8M (Mégantic)
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
87,644,272 87,644,272 103,349,140 85,904,392 -1,739,880
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
46 47 1

Information on CED’s lower-level programs is available on CED’s website and in the TBS InfoBaseFootnote xi.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services refer to the activities and resources of 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model of the department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Management Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

CED continued its efforts to modernize its procedures, improve the client experience and provide a stimulating workplace based on mental health. As the following examples show, Internal Services were particularly involved with this priority during this period.

In partnership with the five RDAs and FedNor, CED developed a common system for grants and contributions which places clients’ concerns at the forefront of its actions. This new government-wide system, which is scheduled to be rolled out in 2019, will provide RDA clients with modern tools, including a transactional portal.

CED also invested resources to plan for the relocation of its headquarters, which is scheduled for 2018, under the Workplace 2.0 initiative of Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC). The initiative is much more than a simple relocation, as CED will create a modern, greener and better workplace and propose solutions to its aging infrastructure.

CED is continuously adapting to an ever changing environment. Operational necessities related to various priorities and initiatives, including those mentioned above, account for the difference between actual and planned FTEs.

Highlights

CED implemented many initiatives aimed at improving internal services in the perspective of modernizing the federal public service. These include the transition to SAP, an integrated management system; the update of the five-year Open Government initiative; and progress on the Destination 2020 Initiative.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2016–17
Main Estimates
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
18,228,067 18,228,067 18,624,549 18,534,411 306,344
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2016–17
Planned
2016–17
Actual
2016–17
Difference
(actual minus planned)
132 140 8

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual spending

Departmental spending trend graph

The graph below shows CED’s actual and planned spending trends. The dark grey bars correspond to G&C expenditures and operating expenditures while the light grey bars show statutory expenditures associated with employee benefits plan.

Figure 1: Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Figure 1 - Long Description
Departmental Spending Trend
Fiscal year Total Voted Statutory Sunset Programs – Anticipated
2014-2015 $253,897,916 $249,654,318 $4,243,598 $0
2015-2016 $259,197,000 $255,126,957 $4,070,043 $0
2016-2017 $315 952 633 $312 037 491 $3 915 142 $0
2017-2018 $303 816 469 $299 484 593 $4 331 876 $0
2018-2019 $234 755 605 $230 423 415 $4 332 190 $0
2019-2020 $227 294 083 $222 961 893 $4 332 190 $0
Budgetary Performance Summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services Main Estimates
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2016–2017
Planned Spending
2017–2018
Planned Spending
2018–2019
Total Authorities Available for Use
2016–2017
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016–2017
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2015–2016
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2014–2015
Business Development 158,796,744 158,796,744 145,866,881 136,290,418 159,007,337 176,315,687 147,576,913 146,564,462
Regional Economic Development 38,450,858 38,450,858 34,883,447 33,080,533 38,516,354 35,198,143 33,610,006 34,133,620
Strong Communities 87,644,272 87,644,272 104,721,027 47,118,599 103,349,140 85,904,392 60,180,857 55,328,034
Subtotal 284,891,874 284,891,874 285,471,355 216,489,550 300,872,831 297,418,222 241,367,776 236,026,116
Internal Services 18,228,067 18,228,067 18,345,114 18,266,055 18,624,549 18,534,411 17,829,224 17,871,800
Total 303,119,941 303,119,941 303,816,469 234,755,605 319,497,380 315,952,633 259,197,000 253,897,916

Actual human resources

Human Resources Planning Summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents [FTEs])
Programs and Internal Services Actual FTEs
2014–2015
Actual FTEs
2015–2016
Planned FTEs
2016–2017
Actual FTEs
2016–2017
Planned FTEs
2017–2018
Planned FTEs
2018–2019
Business Development 121 134 124 122 130 137
Regional Economic Development 20 16 21 21 25 31
Strong Communities 47 37 46 47 36 23
Subtotal 188 187 191 190 191 191
Internal Services 127 128 132 140 132 132
Total 315 315 323 330 323 323

CED used 7 FTEs more than planned in order to support all of its activities and to intensify its efforts in line with its new priorities as well as those of the government, including: to support the Innovation and Skills Plan; develop the new common system for managing G&C, deliver the five-year Open Government Plan, and support the sectors in the planning, implementation and integration of various modernization and transformation initiatives.

Expenditures by vote

For information on CED’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.Footnote xii

Alignment of spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-2017 actual spending with the Whole-of-Government FrameworkFootnote xiii (dollars)
Program Spending Area Government of Canada Activity Actual Spending
2016–2017
Business Development Economic Affairs 176,315,687 176,315,687
Regional Economic Development Economic Affairs 35,198,143 35,198,143
Strong Communities Economic Affairs 85,904,392 85,904,392
Total spending by spending area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 303,119,941 315,952,633
Social Affairs 0 0
International Affairs 0 0
Government Affairs 0 0

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

CED’s unaudited financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2017 are available on the CED website.

Financial statements highlights

The financial highlights presented below provide an overview of CED’s financial position and operations. The unaudited financial statements are drawn up in accordance with government accounting policies, which are based on Canadian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles for the public sector.

Note that the spending presented in the tables in other sections of the Report were prepared on a cash basis, while the financial highlights that follow were prepared on an accrual basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to CED’s Financial Statements.

A more detailed statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations with the requested authorities, are available on the CED website.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information Planned Results
2016–2017
Actual
2016–2017
Actual
2015–2016
Variance
(Actual 2016–2017 minus Planned 2016–2017)
Variance
(Actual 2016–2017 minus Actual 2015–2016)
Total expenses 199,178,000 196,725,692 168,203,868 (2,452,308) 28,521,824
Total revenue 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 199,178,000 196,725,692 168,203,868 (2,452,308) 28,521,824

Expenses

Revenue

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2017 (dollars)
Financial Information 2016–2017 2015–2016 Variance
(2016–2017 minus 2015–2016)
Total net liabilities 22,535,240 27,180,487 (4,645,247)
Total net financial assets 19,285,049 23,875,447 (4,590,398)
Departmental net debt 3,250,191 3,305,040 (54,849)
Total non-financial assets 1,011,361 1,122,769 (111,408)
Departmental net financial position (2,238,830) (2,182,271) (56,559)

Liabilities

Assets

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate Minister:

The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

Deputy Head: Manon Brassard

Ministerial Portfolio: Innovation, Science and Economic Development

Enabling Instruments: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act (S.C. 2005, c. 26)Footnote xiv

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 2005

Reporting framework

The CED Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) of record for 2016–2017 are shown below:

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources relating to CED’s lower-level programs is available on TBS InfoBase.Footnote xv

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on CED’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote xvi This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec
H3B 2T9

Telephone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302
www.dec-ced.gc.ca

Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
Any enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A departmental result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, evaluation is the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.

full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017 to 2018 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: growth for the middle class; open and transparent government; a clean environment and strong economy; diversity is Canada’s strength; and security and opportunity.

horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
A horizontal initiative is one in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (e.g. by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.

Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the strategic outcome(s) to which they contribute. The management, resources and results structure is developed from the program alignment architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired strategic outcome(s).

program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the federal government’s approach to sustainable development

The 2013–16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the [insert name of department] supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy describes the CED’s actions in support of Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality and Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government. The report for 2016–17 presents a high level overview of results and is the final report under the 2013–16 FSDS. Last year’s report is available on the departmental website.

3. Departmental performance highlights

Theme I: addressing climate change and air quality

Under Theme I, DEC contributed to the 2013–16 FSDS through its Business Development Program and contributed to goal 1: Climate change mitigation and 2: Air Pollutants. DEC has:

Theme IV: shrinking the environmental footprint, beginning with government

Under Theme IV, CED contributed to Goal 7: Waste and asset management of the 2013–16 FSDS.

FSDS goal FSDS target FSDS performance indicator FSDS performance results
Goal 7: waste and asset management
Reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.
Target 7.2: green procurement
As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or material management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Number: 5

Percentage: 100%

Note: Internal Services underwent significant restructuring in May 2015. Procurement services are now in a new branch. This restructuring has reduced the number of resource management specialist in procurement or equipment.

Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year

Number: 4

Percentage: 100%

Note: Internal Services underwent significant restructuring in May 2015. Procurement services are now in a new branch. This restructuring has reduced the number of resource management specialist in procurement or equipment.

mer
Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice:
  • Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible.
  • Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement.
Achieved
Departmental performance indicators for departmental green procurement targets:
  • By March 31, 2017, 90% of imaging hardware purchases will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of this hardware.
  • By March 31, 2017, 95% of copy paper, commercial printing, and/or envelope purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of the production.
  • By March 31, 2017, 90% of toner cartridges will be recycled at end of life.
100%

Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations

As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.

Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice:

  • Engage employees to make their workplace more sustainable
  • Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage, and green meetings).
  • Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage.
  • Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
  • Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
  • Increase population density in office buildings and the use of space in special purpose buildings
Achieved

4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2016–17 reporting cycle, CED considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. As the [insert name of department] did not develop any initiatives that required a Strategic Environmental Assessment, no related public statements were produced.]

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more

General Information

Name of transfer payment program

Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)
(Voted payments)

Start date

April 1, 2012

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Grant and contribution

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic Outcome

Quebec regions have a growing economy.

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Business Development
Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development
Sub-program 1.3.3: Temporary or Targeted Initiatives

Description

The QEDP contributes to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate. The QEDP includes repayable and non-repayable contributions.

Results achieved

Through the QEDP, CED invested $244.8 million in 2016–17 in 1,173 projects in order to foster business growth and build strong, competitive regions, and to implement initiatives in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

CED reached its targets for Program 1.1 Business Development. It funded 125 projects ($ 18 M) in Entrepreneurship Support and 636 projects ($ 143 M) to Improve the performance of existing businesses. The survival rate of enterprises supported for Business creation and startup projects is 87%, while that of companies supported for performance projects is 100%.

CED also contributed to strengthen the economic base of Quebec regions through its Program 1.2 Regional Community Economies. Ten individual communities were supported in their mobilization efforts to increase their resilience to economic fluctuations. CED also stimulated investments in the regions: 5 supported communities have implemented projects of collective economic facilities; 7.3 M tourists from outside Quebec were attracted and 59 international organizations and foreign enterprises were maintained or attracted to the region.

Temporary or targeted initiatives delivered through the QEDP supported 314 projects in 92 communities among a possibility of 104. Total investments generated in communities ($110.8M) are less satisfactory, as some projects have experienced implementation delays. Indeed, CED relies on promoters’ efforts to implement their projects, and some promoters who are responsible for large-scale projects will finalize their projects in 2017–2018 rather than 2016–2017, which explains some of the discrepancies in the anticipated results.

In 2016–2017, CED carried out an evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE). Two key findings emerge from this evaluation. The first finding points to the need for CED’s assistance in communities affected by an economic crisis. In vulnerable and often mono-industrial communities, lack of funding leads to significant job losses, and CED’s funding helped to stabilize the situation. The second finding highlights that economic diversification takes time to materialize. CED should therefore seek to establish a sufficiently long period for new initiatives to reflect the long-term nature of some expected deliverables.

Comments on variances

The variance between actual and planned spending is due to supplementary funding for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (Components I and II).

Audits completed or planned

Not applicable

Evaluations completed or planned

Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Mid-term evaluation of the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic and the Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile.

Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE).

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Performance information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15
Actual spending
2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 140,638 1,650,000 1,650,000 0 0 1,650,000
Total contributions 185,582,593 187,377,783 229,403,700 246,493,700 244,818,183 (15,414,483)
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 183,723,231 189,027,783 231,053,700 246,493,700 244,818,183 (13,764,483)

General information

Name of transfer payment program

Community Futures Program (Voted payments)

Start date

May 18, 1995

End date

Permanent

Type of transfer payment

Grant and contribution.

Type of appropriation

Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

Not applicable

Strategic Outcome

Quebec regions have a growing economy.

Link to department’s Program Inventory

Sub-program 1.3.1: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Description

This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs). The CFP includes only non-repayable contributions.

Results achieved

CED provided financial support to 57 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) located in designated rural regions and 10 Business Development Centres ( BDCs) located in peri-urban areas. CED paid $29.6 M to those agencies to support 81 projects aiming to strengthen the economies of Quebec’s rural communities.

Results regarding the survival rate of enterprises supported by the CFP are satisfactory. Set targets were exceeded, with an 80 survival rate of supported firms, compared with 52% for the comparison group.

Comments on variances

Not applicable

Audits completed or planned

Not applicable

Evaluations completed or planned

Evaluation of the community futures program in Quebec.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Not applicable

Performance information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2014–15
Actual spending
2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Planned spending
2016–17
Total authorities available for use
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance (2016–17 actual minus 2016–17 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 28,444,820 28,594,770 28,968,018 28,968,018 29,607,493 (639,475)
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 28,444,820 28,594,770 28,968,018 28,968,018 29,607,493 (639,475)

Internal audits and evaluations

Internal audits completed in 2016–17
Title of internal audit Internal audit type Completion date
Regional development agencies internal audit of information management Information management controls activities October 2016
Evaluations in progress or completed in 2016–17
Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to department’s programs
Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE). Completed May 2016 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies
Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) In progress March 2018 1.1 Business Development
1.2 Regional Economic Development
Evaluation of the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic and the Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile In progress March 2018 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies
Evaluation of the community futures program in Quebec Completed October 2016 1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2016–17.

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

There were no audits in 2016–17 requiring a response.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2016–17 requiring a response.

User fees, regulatory charges and external fees

Reporting on the User Fees Act

General and financial information by fee

General information

Fee name

Fees for processing requests filed under the Access to Information Act. As a result of a new Treasury Board Secretariat directive, no other fees are charged for reproduction, research, preparation, production, programming and alternate format.

Fee type

Other products and services

Fee-setting authority

Access to Information Act and Regulations

Year introduced

1983

Year last amended

2017

Performance standard

The person responsible in the organization is required to convey in whole or in part the documents requested, within 30 days following receipt of the access to information request. Pursuant to section 9 of the Act, the response time may be extended; notice of extension must then be given to the requester. Further information on the Access to Information Act can be found on the Justice Canada website . Information on the regulations under the Act may also be consulted on the legislation site.

Performance results

Considering the number of requests extended in 2016–17, 100% of requests were answered within the timeframe set out in the Access to Information Act. CED answered to 75% of requests within 30 days, with close to a quarter of requests receiving a response before day 15.

Other information

Not applicable

Financial information, 2016–17 (dollars)
Forecast revenue Actual revenue Full cost
100 100 100,742
Financial information, 2017–18, 2018–19 and 2019–20 (dollars)
Planning year Forecast revenue Estimated full cost
2017–18 125 120,000
2018–19 125 123,000
2019–20 125 125,000

Methodology and Technical Notes on Performance Data

1. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) Performance Measurement Methodology

1.1 Project tracking

The tracking of CED-supported projects is carried out through a performance data collection system that has been in place since April 1, 2007. On April 1, 2012, a new Performance Management Framework (PMF) was implemented, reflecting CED’s new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its new regular program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP). Since that date, project tracking has exhibited major improvements, in particular the reduction in the number of indicators, as well as efforts to simplify and automate the management information system (Hermès).

In the field of economic development, expected results are rarely observed during the year of the expenditure. Generally speaking, it is only after one or two years that the impact of an enterprise’s development activities on its sales is seen. The same is true for many activities supported through CED programs, whether in market development, technology transfer or enterprise creation.

To report on the use of funding awarded by CED in 2016–17, and intermediate and final results, two main baselines are used in this report:

Moreover, CED’s intervention takes place in two ways:

In addition, during fiscal year 2015–16, CED conducted an in-depth analysis of its performance measurement strategy (PMS). This analysis was necessary to respond to the findings of program evaluations and also to comply with the Policy on Transfer Payments, which specifies that departments must update their programs PMS on a regular basis. The result chains and their indicators have been revised, thus making it possible to improve each of the components of the Program Alignment Architecture (PAA). CED also conducted a literature review on performance measurement and accountability conducted by other similar government agencies, resulting in a comparative analysis.

The PMS analysis enabled CED to develop its next Departmental Results Framework 2018–19 and to create the accompanying tools: Program Directory and Performance Information Profiles, as per the new requirements of the new TBS Policy on Results.

1.2 Performance data collection

1.2.1 Reliability of performance data

For DA projects, project results are tracked by business office advisors as part of regular client agreement follow-up activities. Generally speaking, data comes from enterprises’ financial statements, thus yielding a high level of reliability. Instructions for using and inputting indicators along with appropriate quality controls ensure standardized input of data into the Hermès performance information system. In that regard, simplification and automation have reduced the time advisors devote to tracking the performance of each project.

In 2014, CED introduced a new data collection strategy for IGs projects in order to measure the impact of IGs’ intervention with their recipients. This approach, which involves tracking IGs’ clientele directly, is based on obtaining a list of accompanied recipients so that CED can send them a survey. To date, results are conclusive and yield more reliable information on services provided to recipients. This procedure helps avoid a situation where an enterprise is counted twice, through different IGs. Note that this approach will be broadened to all IGs supported by CED in the years to come.

The Technical Notes section in Appendix 1 provides detailed information on the reliability of the data presented in this report. Findings of the most recent internal audit on the integrity of the information from the Hermès system confirm that the information contained in the Hermès Programmes application, CED’s tracking system, is reliable for decision-making and information purposes.

1.2.2 Attribution of results

CED works closely with a number of departments and agencies of the governments of Canada and Quebec, and with many local and regional stakeholders. This collaboration is reflected in the financial packages put together for projects. That is why CED cannot claim the merit or the responsibility for all the results obtained. For this reason, it is more accurate to say that the financial assistance granted by CED for the completion of projects contributes to the attainment of the results observed.

2. Technical Notes on Performance Data

List of acronyms:

BDC:
Business Development Centre
CFDC:
Community Futures Development Corporation
CFO:
Community Futures Organization
CFP:
Community Futures Program
CIP150:
Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program
DA:
(interventions) Direct intervention with enterprises
DPR:
Departmental Performance Report
EDI:
Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative
ET:
Equivalent territory
G&C:
Grants and contributions
GDP:
Gross domestic product
IG:
Intervention through intermediary groups
LII:
Local Investment Initiative
NPO:
Non-profit organization
OLMCs:
Official Language Minority Communities
ORPEX:
Regional export promotion organization
PAA:
Program Alignment Architecture
QEDP:
Quebec Economic Development Program
RCM:
Regional county municipality
REMOM:
Mount Mégantic Observatory
RIWC:
Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings
RPP:
Report on Plans and Priorities
SICSBOQ:
Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec
SME:
Small and medium-sized enterprise
Chrysotile:
Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
Infrastructure:
Infrastructure Canada Program
Mégantic:
Funding for the economic recovery of Lac-Mégantic
Pipeline:
Bellechasse Pipeline

2.1 Technical notes on Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) indicators

STRATEGIC OUTCOME – Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Indicator:

Number of Quebec administrative regions that increased their GDP

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017

Result attained:

17 administrative regions out of 17 have increased their GDP

Data source:

Institut de la statistique du Québec

Methodology:

Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their GDP between 2012 and 2017.

Notes:

There are a total of 17 administrative regions in Quebec.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Indicator:

Percentage of Quebec communities having improved their economic performance

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017

Result attained:

70% of Quebec communities have improved their economic performance

Data source:

Statistics Canada, Institut de la statistique du Québec, Conference Board of Canada, and United States Patent and Trademark Office

Methodology:

Number of Quebec RCMs and ETs having improved their economic performance with regard to the main economic variables in CED’s Economic Development Index (participation rate, value of building permits, level of entrepreneurship, productivity, level of exporting establishments, number of patents, and diversification) out of the total number of RCMs/ETs, expressed as a percentage, between 2012 and 2017.

Notes:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ET in Quebec.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Program 1.1 – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Final result – The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed.

Indicator:

Rate of survival of businesses supported in their start-up

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

87% (33/38 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

The DPR 2016–17 result covers projects for which a survival rate in 2016–17 can be observed. Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and start-up whose projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) in 2013-14 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e. in 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business creation and start-up whose projects were completed in 2013–14, expressed as a percentage.

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Indicator:

Rate of survival of businesses supported in their development

Collection frequency:

Year

Result attained:

100% (201/201 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès management information system and CED’s Recovery Services.

Methodology:

The DPR 2016–17 result for which a survival rate in 2016–17 can be observed. Number of enterprises supported for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) whose projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) in 2013-14 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e. in 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17, out of the total number of enterprises that received financial assistance for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) whose projects were completed in 2013-14, expressed as a percentage.

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.1.1 – Entrepreneurship Support

Intermediate result – Enterprises are started up or transferred

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises started up

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

46% (21/46 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and start-up that attained or maintained the status of start-up enterprise in calendar 2015 out of the number of enterprises whose Business creation and start-up projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) in 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16 and 2016–17, expressed as a percentage. An enterprise is deemed to have started up when it meets the following two conditions: it has been in operation for at least one year, and it generates revenues equivalent to at least 80% of its expenditures.

Reliability of result:

Average; 48% of data missing (42/88) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2016 financial statements as of early June 2017.

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to support entrepreneurship

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

125

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of Entrepreneurship Support (Business creation and start-up and Business succession and transfer) projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to support entrepreneurship

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$17,836,113

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Entrepreneurship Support (Business creation and start-up and Business succession and transfer) projects in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.1.2 – Business Performance

Intermediate result – Enterprises improve their performance.

Indicator:

Percentage of coached businesses that maintained or increased their sales figures or self-generated income

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

75% (120/159 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2016, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer and Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) in FYs 2013–14, 2014–15 and 2015–16 , out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by this pool, expressed as a percentage.

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 22% of data missing (44/203) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2016 financial statements as of early June 2017.

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to enhance existing enterprises’ performance

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

636

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to enhance existing enterprises’ performance

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$143,303,767

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Program 1.2 – REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Final result – Quebec’s regions have a stronger economic base.

Indicator:

Total amount of investment generated in regions supported that completed the implementation of their development project

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$2,569,815

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

The DPR 2016–17 result covers projects completed in 2016–17. Sum of total costs of Development strategies and Community economic facilities implementation projects that were completed (actual project end date) in 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Indicator:

Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$4.2B

Data source:

Statistique Canada

Methodology:

In previous DPRs, we used the most recent annual amount released by Tourisme Québec of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e. the sum of spending by tourists from other provinces, the United States and other countries. At the time of producing the data for the 2016–17 DPR, Tourisme Québec has not yet published its annual report (2015 data), so we used Statistics Canada data (2015 data). We were able to reconstruct the same methodology, so the figures are comparable from one year to the next.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Indicator:

Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$1.76B

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the organizations supported

Methodology:

The DPR 2016–17 result corresponds to the sum of annual foreign direct investment maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by organizations receiving financial assistance having incurred expenditures in 2016–17 for Promotion of regional assets projects.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.2.1 – Regional Engagement

Intermediate result – Communities take charge of their economic

Indicator:

Number of communities supported that implement engagement projects

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

10

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Development strategies projects in 2016–17. Reliability of result: Very high

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to engage the regions

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

14

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of Regional Engagement (Development strategies) projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to engage the regions

Result attained:

$2,569,815

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of Regional Engagement (Development strategies) project expenditures in 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.2.2 – Regional Investment

Intermediate result – Quebec regions attract investment.

Indicator:

Number of communities supported that implement community economic facility projects

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

5

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Community economic facilities projects in 2016–17. Reliability of result: Very high

Indicator:

Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$7.3M

Data source:

Statistics Canada

Methodology:

In previous DPRs, we used the most recent annual amount released by Tourisme Québec of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e. the sum of spending by tourists from other provinces, the United States and other countries. This data is limited to the number of tourists and does not include excursionists. At the time of producing the data for the 2016–17 DPR, Tourisme Québec has not yet published its annual report (2015 data), so we used Statistics Canada data (2015 data). We were able to reconstruct the same methodology, for the sum of tourists from other Canadian provinces and the United States. However, for visitors from other countries, we are not able to exclude excursionists from the number of visitors. The figures are therefore not perfectly comparable from one year to the next, but we consider that this difference is not significant and will not induce the reader to draw misinterpretations. Thus, by reconstructing the figure of the previous DPR with our new methodology, we would have obtained 6.5 M tourists instead of 6.4 M, the difference is minus 2%, which is therefore not considered material, an accounting point of view

Reliability of result:

Very high

Indicator:

Number of international organizations and foreign enterprises maintained or attracted to the regions supported

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

59

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the organizations supported

Methodology:

Total number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by organizations receiving financial assistance having incurred expenditures in 2016–17 for Promotion of regional assets projects.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to attract investment to the regions

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

84

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of Regional Investment (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to attract investment to the regions

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$31,873,829

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Regional Investment (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) projects in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Program 1.3 – Strengthening Community Economies

Final result – Quebec communities have stronger economies.

Indicator:

Percentage point increase in the survival rate of CFP clients having received assistance compared with the rate for comparable enterprises not having received assistance.

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

28 percentage points

Data source:

Seventh Statistics Canada study on the performance of CFDCs.

Methodology:

For the CFP, the DPR 2016–17 result corresponds to the difference between the rate of survival over five years of CFP clients and a comparable group of enterprises not having received assistance.

Notes:

The CFP indicator was modified during the 2015–16 MRRS process. Reliability of result: Very high

Indicator:

Value of total investment generated in communities (for temporary and targeted support)

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$49.8M

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Sum of total costs of projects under completed temporary or targeted initiatives (actual project end date) in 2016–17.

Notes:

Not applicable

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

Intermediate result – Communities are economically sustainable.

Indicator:

Percentage point increase in the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance compared with the rate for comparable enterprises not having received assistance.

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

2.4 percentage points

Data source:

Seventh Statistics Canada study on the performance of CFDCs covering the period from 2009 to 2014 (see page 10 of study).

Methodology:

Difference between the average annual growth rate in sales over five years of CFP clients and a comparable group of enterprises not having received assistance.

Notes:

According to the Seventh Statistics Canada study, the growth rate is 6.7% for enterprises supported by the CFP and 4.3% for the comparison group.

Reliability of result:

High

Output:

Number of projects funded by CFOs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

2230

Data source:

Hermès information management system and promoters’ reports

Methodology:

Sum of number of enterprises having received personalized coaching services with respect to pre-start-up, start-up or acquisition of enterprises and number of enterprises undergoing recovery, expansion or modernization having received coaching services from CFDCs and BDCs in 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

High. Use of a new data source (i.e., list provided by CFDCs of enterprises receiving assistance) yields more reliable data and considerably reduces the possibility of duplication.

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded to CFDCs and BDCs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

$29,607,793

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for CFDC and BDC projects in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.3.2 – Infrastructure Modernization

Intermediate result – Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure.

Indicator:

Number of communities that have at their disposal completed public infrastructure under the terms of the contribution agreement

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

Not applicable

Data source:

Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, developed by Infrastructure Canada

Methodology:

Results are reported in Infrastructure Canada’s DPR.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Sub-program 1.3.3 – Targeted or Temporary Support

Intermediate result - Communities have targeted and/or temporary support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies.

Indicator:

Number of communities that benefit from temporary or targeted support

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

92

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of individual communities carrying out Targeted and/or temporary support projects in 2016–17 (projects with expenditures).

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Number of projects funded for communities to have temporary support, by initiative

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

EDI: 19
RIWC: 1
Chrysotile: 30
SICSBOQ: 1
Mégantic: 11
REMOM: 1
LII: 1
Pipeline: 1
PIC150: 249

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of projects by initiative with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded for communities to have temporary support, by initiative

Collection frequency:

Yearly

Result attained:

EDI: $1,946,476
Chrysotile: $13,208,480
Mégantic: $35,182,98
LII: $18,757
RIWC: $40,711,31
SICSBOQ: $1,500,000
REMOM: $
Pipeline: $15,539,434
PIC 150: $10,359,986

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Sum of expenditures for projects with expenditures in 2016–17, by initiative.

Reliability of result:

Very high

2.2 Technical notes on other performance data

2.2.1 Additional data with respect to strategic outcome

Data:

Total number of projects supported in 2016–17

Value:

1254

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Total number of projects approved in 2016–17

Value:

756

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of projects approved in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Total actual expenditures in 2016–17

Value:

$274,425,676

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Total leverage effect in 2016–17

Value:

3.2

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Leverage effect corresponds to the difference between Total cost of projects with expenditures in 2016–17 and Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2016–17 divided by Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2016–17.

Notes:

Since project durations and start dates vary, the leverage effect accounts for sums spread over several years, before, during or after 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Value of multi-year financial assistance approved by CED in 2016–17

Value:

$327,371,183

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total amount of Authorized assistance for projects approved in 2016–17; no processing

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Value of total investment generated in 2016–17

Value:

$1,115,515,351

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total costs of projects approved in 2016–17; no processing

Reliability of result:

Very high

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2016–17)

Value:

11,229 (997 in DA and 10,232 in IG)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises (including asset-operating NPOs under Business Performance)) having received financial support from CED on the basis of DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of individual communities having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2016–17)

Value:

104 (102 in DA and 104 in IG)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities having received financial support from CED on the basis of DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Notes:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ETs in Quebec (one RCM/ET = one community).

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

2.2.2 Additional data with respect to Business Performance sub-program

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support under the Business Performance sub-program (direct/indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

8,422 (287 in DA and 8 135 in GI)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in their Productivity and expansion project (direct/indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

1,935 (234 in DA and 1701 in GI)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Productivity and expansion DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Innovation and technology transfer (direct/indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

1,642 (7 in DA and 1635 in GI)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Innovation and technology transfer DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Commercialization and exports (direct/indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

4,362 (42 in DA and 4320 in GI)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Commercialization and exports DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Structuring of networks (indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

483 (4 in DA and 479 in GI)

Data source:

Hermès information management system and IG activity reports

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Structuring of networks IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17

Reliability of result:

IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Number of newly exporting enterprises (indirect assistance, in 2016–17)

Value:

1,630

Data source:

IG activity reports and survey of IG clients

Methodology:

Number of newly exporting enterprises in 2016–17 on the basis of Commercialization and export IG projects with expenditures in 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Productivity and expansion having maintained or increased their sales

Value:

78% (100/129 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2016, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) in FYs 2013–14, 2014-15 and 2015–16, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by this pool, expressed as a percentage.

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 23% of data missing (38/167) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2016 financial statements as of early June 2017.

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Innovation and technology transfer having maintained or increased their sales

Value:

50% (3/6 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2016, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Innovation and technology transfer projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) between FYs 2013–14,2014–15 and 2015–16, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage.

Reliability of result:

DA: High; no data missing.

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Commercialization and exports having maintained or increased their sales

Value:

71% (17/24 X 100; DA only)

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2016, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e. actual project end date) in FYs 2013–14, 2014–15 and 2015–16, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage.

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 17% of data missing (5/29) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2016 financial statements as of early June 2017.

2.2.3 Additional data with respect to the Regional Engagement sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.1.2 Regional Engagement

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the Regional Engagement SP in 2016–17

Result attained:

10

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2016–17 for Development strategies projects (total of planning and implementation projects.

Reliability of result:

Very high

2.2.4 Additional data with respect to the Community economic facilities sub-sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.2.2 Regional Investment

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the Community economic facilities sub-sub-program in 2016–17

Result attained:

5

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2016–17 for Community economic facilities projects (total of planning and implementation projects).

Reliability of result:

Very high

2.2.5 Additional data with respect to the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) sub-sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.3.3 Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the EDI sub-sub-program in 2016–17

Result attained:

16 OLMC

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total number of OLMC receiving financial assistance in 2016–17 for EDI projects. Every EDI project with expenditures in 2016–17 was verified in Hermès

Reliability of result:

Very high

2.2.6 Additional data with respect to the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP150 calls 1 and 2)

Type of result:

SP 1.3.3 Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Indicator:

Number of projects approved in 2016–17 under CIP150

Result attained:

246

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total number of projects approved in 2016–17 under CIP150.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Type of result:

SP 1.3.3 Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Indicator:

Value of multiyear financial assistance approved in 2016–17 for CIP150 projects (calls 1 and 2)

Result attained:

$25,416,182

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Total value of authorized assistance approved (CED) in 2016–17 for CIP150 projects, i.e. financial assistance reserved for the client’s specific project.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Type of result:

SP 1.3.3 Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Indicator:

Value of investments generated in 2016–17 for CIP150 projects (calls 1 and 2)

Result attained:

$7,281,510

Data source:

Hermès information management system

Methodology:

Value of investments generated in 2016–17 corresponding to the total cost of projects completed for 2016–17.

Reliability of result:

Very high

Date modified: