Performance Report as of March 31, 2015

Download the PDF version

About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

ISSN number : 1490-7380

Catalog number : Iu90-1/13E-PDF

Publish date : January 25, 2016

Summary :

This report deals with Canada Economic Development's principal achievements in regards to its engagements towards the Parliament

Table of Contents

  1. Ministers' Message
  2. Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview
  3. Section II : Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome
  4. Section III - Supplementary Information
  5. Section IV : Organizational Contact Information
  6. Appendix - Definitions
  7. Endnotes
  8. Supplementary Information Tables

Ministers' Message

We are pleased to present this report on the key activities of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions in 2014–15.

Our overarching goals within the Innovation, Science and Economic Development portfolio are to help Canadian businesses grow, innovate and export so that they can spur economic development and create good quality jobs and wealth for Canadians in all regions across the country; to help small businesses grow through trade and innovation; to promote increased tourism to Canada; to promote and support scientific research and the integration of scientific considerations in our investment and policy choices. We are committed to working closely with colleagues and stakeholders from all of these diverse fields to achieve these objectives.

We are pleased to present the 2014-15 Departmental Performance Report for Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions.

 
The Honourable Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science
and Economic Development
The Honourable Kirsty Duncan
Minister of Science
The Honourable Bardish Chagger
Minister of Small Business
and Tourism
 

Section I - Organizational Expenditure Overview

1.1 Organizational Profile

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development:
The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.

 

Minister of Science:
The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Small Business and Tourism:
The Honourable Bardish Chagger, P.C., M.P.

Deputy Head: Marie Lemay

Ministerial Portfolio: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Enabling Instrument: Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ActEndnote1

Year Established: 2005

 

1.2 Organizational Context

1.2.1 Raison d’être and Responsibilities

Mission

Under its Act,Endnote2 which came into effect on October 5, 2005, the object of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.”

Strategic Outcome

Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Vision

Quebec regions and enterprises participate to their full potential in the economy of tomorrow, building on their respective assets.

 

As part of its mission, CED promotes the startup and performance of businesses. It helps them become more competitive, productive, innovative and active on markets in Canada and elsewhere. It supports communities’ engagement efforts in the different regions of Quebec and helps attract investment that will increase the prosperity of the Quebec and Canadian economies.

CED thus contributes to the economic vitality of all Quebec regions, by paying special attention to communities with low economic growth, as stipulated in its enabling Act. In this respect, CED uses an Economic Development IndexEndnote3 which allows it, among other things, to determine the economic development levels of Quebec’s 104 communitiesEndnote4 in order to meet needs effectively.

CED works with businesses, primarily small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), as well as non-profit organizations (NPOs), through its business offices.Endnote5 By providing financial assistance for projects, among other things, CED supports their development efforts.

CED’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development.Endnote6 It is:

CED’s Grants and Contributions Programs and Initiatives, in effect 2014–15Endnote7

Main Program:

Targeted and/or Temporary Initiatives:

Canada-wide Program Implemented in Quebec by CED:

Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner in Quebec:Endnote8

 

1.2.2 Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

This report is structured according to CED’s Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), which came into effect on April 1, 2012.Endnote9 The following list presents the complete framework of CED’s four programs and seven sub-programs,Endnote10the links among them, and the strategic outcome to which they contribute.

1.2.3 Organizational Priorities

Priorities represent the areas on which CED has decided to focus, but do not exclude the execution of activities in other areas of the PAA. They are established on the basis of Government of Canada priorities, departmental targeted results and risks, and the economic challenges of Quebec’s different regions. During FY 2014–15, CED implemented the following three priorities, which are in line with those presented in its most recent Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs):

Priority #1 Type Link to Program
Support the maintenance and growth of businesses Ongoing 1.1 Business Development
Summary of Progress
  • Because of its economic mandate, CED is central to national priorities with respect to the prosperity of regions and businesses, and job creation.
  • CED signed 440 new contribution agreements with regard to this priority in 2014–15, representing $171 million in approved financial assistance. This was an increase over the previous year, in volume (23%) and dollars (32%).
  • Financial assistance approved in support of businesses was based on:
    • productivity and expansion, with 250 projects for approved assistance totalling $86.4 million;
    • innovation and technology transfer, with 34 projects totalling $29.8 million in approved assistance;
    • business creation and startup, with 54 projects totalling $28.6 million in approved financial assistance;
    • commercialization and exports, with 91 projects totalling $23.3 million in approved assistance; and
    • structuring of networks, with 11 projects totalling $3.2 million in approved assistance.
  • CED contributes to the dynamism and vitality of regional economies, by paying particular attention to communities with lower growth potential.Endnote11 In 2014–15, 32% of the assistance approved by CED with respect to business growth targeted RCMs with low potential for growth. Those communites account for 21% of Quebec’s total population.
Priority #2 Type Link to Program
Contribute to strengthening the economy of the regions and communities through targeted and/or temporary support Ongoing
(wording revised)
1.3
Strengthening Community Economies
Summary of Progress

In 2014–15, CED continued to engage in order to strengthen community economies, by providing communities with targeted and/or temporary support. CED implemented three priority initiatives:

  1. Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Has a budget envelope of $50 million over seven years (2013–2020);
    • Aims to accompany communities and businesses in Des Appalaches and Des Sources RCMs in their efforts to diversify and strengthen their economic base and thus increase their long-term growth potential;
    • In 2014–15, 11 projects totalling close to $7 million were approved.
  2. Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
    • With a budget envelope of $35 million over seven years (2013-2020), it is divided into three components: rebuilding of the town, direct assistance to enterprises, and creation of two investment funds managed by the Mégantic-area Community Futures Development Corporation (CFDC);
    • Aims to provide support for the economic recovery and rebuilding of the town in the aftermath of the rail accident of July 6, 2013;
    • Deployment of a dedicated team in the field to accompany local stakeholders in their economic development efforts;
    • In 2014–15, 13 projects totalling $9.6 million were approved.
  3. Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec
    • An agreement with a $6-million envelope over four years (2014–2018) was signed with the Société de protection des forêts contre les insectes et les maladies (SOPFIM) to help control the spruce budworm infestation in the Bas-Saint-Laurent, Gaspésie and Côte-Nord regions;
    • Is aimed at supporting the sustainability and dynamism of the forestry sector and the health of Canada’s forests, which are vital to rural communities.

Through its activities under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED also implemented two new initiatives to contribute to strengthening community economies:

  1. Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings on Forest Multi-use Roads in Wildlife Areas
    • The goal of this Canada-Quebec Agreement is to encourage the restoration of watercourse crossings damaged by weathering and severe storms, and to ensure the improvement, rehabilitation and maintenance of these multi-use roads in wildlife areas.
    • In 2014–15, $1.5 million was invested through this Canada-Quebec Agreement to fund projects.
  2. Local Investment Initiative
    • CED funded projects to support local investment in all Quebec regions by encouraging the rehabilitation, improvement or expansion of existing community halls, accessible to the public on a non-commercial basis.
    • In 2014–15, 198 projects totalling $7.9 million were approved.
Priority #3 Type Link to Program
Continue the Agency’s transformation and modernization to improve its efficiency Ongoing
(wording revised)
All
Summary of Progress

In 2014–15, CED continued to simplify and modernize its processes and tools while implementing departmental and government-wide initiatives. Also, the Destination 2020 initiative allowed CED to carry out an action plan drawn up following the employee consultations held in 2013–14.

Facilitate transactions with its clientele through simplification and modernization of its processes and tools

  • In 2014–15, CED adopted a step-by-step approach aimed at reviewing and simplifying its business processes with a view to generating efficiencies and facilitating transactions with its clientele. For instance, CED introduced the online application form for the QEDP and revamped its website. It also plays an active role in development of a common, government-wide management system for grants and contributions (G&C).

Generate efficiencies through implementation of CED and government-wide initiatives

  • In 2014–15, CED implemented several initiatives, including common operational processes in HR, and the Directive on Performance Management. It also put in place the Cost-effective Telephone Services Initiative.

Turning the vision for 2020 into reality through implementation of tangible measures

  • In 2014–15, CED maintained its commitment toward the vision for 2020, with a view to defining and building the Public Service for the future. CED’s report tabled in January 2015 with the Clerk of the Privy Council showed that more than 85% of the initiatives in the action plan were in the process of being implemented or were already in effect at CED.
  • CED showed its continued openness to innovation by putting in place activities that elicit creative and innovative ideas from employees.

1.2.4 Risk Analysis

The main external risk likely to affect the fulfilment of CED’s mandate is linked to changes in the Quebec, Canadian and global economies.

The table below presents this risk, associated response strategies, and the link to the PAA and organizational priorities.

 
Corporate Risks Risk Response Strategies Link to PAA Link to Priorities
External Risk
Economic Risk and Institutional Capacity
Risk that the pursuit of priorities and results expected from CED’s economic development programs may be affected by the economic context
  • Ongoing economic analysis, development and implementation of policies and intervention tools in response to the economic context and Government priorities (e.g., ongoing watch, special initiatives)
  • Establishment of intervention priorities and reallocation of resources accordingly
  • Implementation of the operational risk policy for grants and contributions management
  • Implementation of CED’s visibility and outreach strategy aimed at making known its mandate and intervention priorities on a timely basis
Program 1.1:
Business Development

Program 1.2:
Regional Economic Development

Program 1.3:
Strengthening Community Economies
# 1, 2 and 3

1.3 Actual Expenditures

This section provides an overview of financial and human resources, along with a summary table portraying CED’s performance in 2014–15.

Financial ResourcesEndnote12 for 2014–15 (dollars)
Total Budgetary Expenditures Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesEndnote13 Actual Spending Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
247,840,617 247,840,617 256,774,298 253,897,916 6,057,299

For 2014–15, CED spent $253.9 million out of a possible $256.8 million, or 99% of the authorities.

Human Resources for 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
308 315 7

During the year, CED had to adjust in order to meet Government priorities and the challenges and issues facing Quebec enterprises and communities. In 2014–15, it approved 731 new projects, up 13% from the previous year. CED also implemented new initiatives which contribute to strengthening the economy of communities and regions through targeted and/or temporary support.

CED successfully met its commitments and priorities while remaining within its operating budget. Thus, it had to adapt the allocation of its resources as planned in the RPP 2014–15 among the programs in its PAA. The Strengthening Community Economies and Internal Services programs were in greater demand than had been anticipated for FY 2014–15.

Table 1 – Budgetary Performance Summary for Strategic Outcome and ProgramsEndnote14 (dollars)
Strategic Outcome, Programs and Internal Services Main Estimates 2014-2015 Planned SpendingEndnote15 Total Authorities Available for Use 2014–15Endnote16 Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2014-2015 2013-2014 2012-2013
Strategic Outcome #1: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.
Program 1.1:
Business Development
146,609,271 146,609,271 151,677,176 140,314,211 146,499,765 146,564,462 147,594,134 130,483,270
Program 1.2:
Regional Economic Development
48,507,928 48,507,928 35,237,510 32,313,130 47,945,992 34,133,620 39,132,388 44,054,296
Program 1.3:
Strengthening Community Economies
38,816,648 38,816,648 53,720,902 51,673,326 46,333,260 55,328,034 64,286,545 102,808,455
Subtotal -
Strategic Outcome #1
233,933,847 233,933,847 240,635,588 224,300,667 240,779,017 236,026,116 251,013,067 277,346,021
Subtotal -
Internal Services
13,906,770 13,906,770 20,446,605 20,314,530 15,995,281 17,871,800 18,292,750 19,083,325
TOTAL 247,840,617 247,840,617 261,082,194 244,615,197 256,774,298 253,897,916 269,305,817 296,429,346

Spending Analysis by PAA Program

For FY 2014–15, CED’s total grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures stood at $253.9 million. Of that, $212.2 million was invested in G&C in projects aimed at economic development. The balance of $41.7 million was used for operations.

a. Performance of PAA programs, excluding Internal Services

Table 1 shows that CED’s actual spending for 2014–15, aside from expenditures associated with its Internal Services, reached $236 million, thus accounting for 92.9% of its total actual spending. This broke down among CED’s PAA programs as follows:

In view of the Government’s budget cycle, the variance observed between CED’s actual and planned spending in 2014–15 in the Strengthening Community Economies program is attributable to the fact that, when the RPP 2014–15 was released, the yearly budgets were not known for certain temporary grants and contributions programs, such as the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec.

Also, CED’s programs are flexible so as to adjust continually to the challenges and issues of Quebec’s enterprises and different regions. This was reflected in 2014–15 in the implementation of temporary initiatives and an increase in business volume which required resource adjustments, in line with applicable statutes, policies and regulations. The variance between CED’s forecasts and its actual spending among PAA programs is also attributable to the nature and type of projects submitted by promoters and reflects local needs with regard to economic development. In fact, the design and implementation of projects supported by CED depend on local and regional enterprises and stakeholders. As a result, there is considerable interdependence among the economic context, the dynamism of all the agents involved, and CED’s results.

b. Performance of Internal Services

CED’s actual spending in 2014–15 in the Internal Services program of its PAA stood at $17.9 million. Consequently, the relative share of Internal Services out of CED’s total expenditures was 7.0% in 2014–15.

 

1.4 Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

2014–15 Spending by Whole-of-Government Framework Spending AreaEndnotei (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Programs Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome Actual Spending
Quebec’s regions have a growing economy 1.1 Business Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth $146,564,462
1.2 Regional Economic Development Economic Affairs Strong economic growth $34,133,620
1.3 Strengthening of Community Economies Economic Affairs Strong economic growth $55,328,034
1.4 Internal Services Economic Affairs Strong economic growth $17,871,800
Total Spending 2014–15 by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs $247,840,617
Social Affairs N/A
International Affairs N/A
Government Affairs N/A

1.5 Departmental Spending Trend

The figure below shows CED’s actual and planned spending trend. The light grey bar corresponds to G&C expenditures and operating expenditures under its regular programs,Endnote17 while the dark grey bar indicates those associated with sunset programs.Endnote18

Figure 1: Actual SpendingEndnote19 and Planned SpendingEndnote20 Trend, April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2018

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

Long Description

The figure above presents actual spending from 2012–13 to 2014–15, and planned spending from 2015–16 to 2017–18.

With regard to actual expenditures, the figure above shows a 14% drop in CED’s spending between 2012–13 and 2014–15, from $296 million to $254 million. The largest decline was from 2012–13 to 2013–14. The variation may be explained by, among other things, the termination of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) and the Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers. The decline in sunset program budgets from 2013–14 to 2014–15 is largely attributable to the termination of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund program.

With respect to CED’s planned spending, the $7-million rise in expenditures from 2014–15 ($233.4 million) to 2015–16 ($240 million) is primarily attributable to increased reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments. The same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the authorities have not been granted at this stage.

The variation in CED’s sunset programs from 2015–16 to 2017–18 is explained by the variability in funding levels from year to year for the various planned initiatives, including in particular the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile.

 

Figure 1 presents actual spending from 2012–13 to 2014–15, and planned spending from 2015–16 to 2017–18.

With regard to actual expenditures, the figure above shows a 14% drop in CED’s spending between 2012–13 and 2014–15, from $296 million to $254 million. The largest decline was from 2012–13 to 2013–14. The variation may be explained by, among other things, the termination of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) and the Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers. The decline in sunset program budgets from 2013–14 to 2014–15 is largely attributable to the termination of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund program.

With respect to CED’s planned spending, the $7-million rise in expenditures from 2014–15 ($233.4 million) to 2015–16 ($240 million) is primarily attributable to increased reinvestment of revenues from clients’ contribution repayments. The same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2016–17 and 2017–18, since the authorities have not been granted at this stage.

The variation in CED’s sunset programs from 2015–16 to 2017–18 is explained by the variability in funding levels from year to year for the various planned initiatives, including in particular the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile.

1.6 Expenditures by Vote

For information on CED’s voted appropriations and/or statutory expenditures, please consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2015Endnoteii on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website.Endnoteiii

Section II : Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

This section provides information on the results of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) for 2014–15 in relation to planned outcomes, on the basis of its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), as illustrated below.Endnoteiv

1. Strategic Outcome – Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

Program 1.1
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Program 1.2
REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Program 1.3
STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

Subprogram 1.1.1:
ENTREPRENEURSHIP SUPPORT

Sub-program 1.2.1:
REGIONAL ENGAGEMENT

Sub-program 1.3.1.:
COMMUNITY FUTURES PROGRAM

Sub-program 1.1.2:
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE

Sub-program 1.2.2:
REGIONAL INVESTMENT

Sub-program 1.3.2:
INFRASTRUCTURE MODERNIZATION

 
 

Sub-program 1.3.3:
TARGETED AND/OR TEMPORARY SUPPORT

Program 1.4
INTERNAL SERVICES

 

2.1 Strategic Outcome (SO): Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

Overall Performance Measurement
CED Overall Results Performance
2014-2015

Total number of projects supportedEndnote21

Total number of projects approvedEndnote22

Total actual spending

Leverage effectEndnote23

1,083 projects supported

731 projects approved

$212.2 million

$2.88 for each dollar invested by CED

SO Performance Indicators Targets Actual ResultsEndnote24 Attainment Date
Number of administrative regions of Quebec that increased their gross domestic product 17 NA April 1, 2017
Percentage of Quebec communitiesEndnote25 having improved their economic performanceEndnote26 65% NA April 1, 2017

Performance Analysis

For FY 2014–15, CED’s overall performance was positive. Indeed, it contributed to the economic prosperity and growth of Quebec’s regions.

CED makes a difference in the regions of Quebec through its action

CED fosters the advancement in Quebec of Canada-wide strategies and regional priorities with respect to economic development

CED is transforming itself and modernizing its procedures to serve its clients more effectively

2.2 Program 1.1 – Business Development

Strategic Outcome #1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.1
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Sub-program 1.1.1:
ENTREPRENEURSHIP SUPPORT

Sub-program 1.1.2:
BUSINESS PERFORMANCE

 

Description

This program (P) is designed to support enterprises throughout their life cycle so as to sustain Quebec’s economic growth. Businesses, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in particular, are an engine of economic development. They are recognized as generating a significant share of economic activity and creating employment in communities.

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (CED) contributes to the renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec by supporting the emergence of new enterprises and business succession. CED also works to increase the competitiveness of existing enterprises and support their survival by enhancing their performance. It does so by supporting projects that enable enterprises to modernize, expand, launch or extend their export activities, reinforce their innovation capability, commercialize, and establish partnerships.

In this program, CED intervenes primarily in relation to enterprises, either directly or through non-profit organizations providing support for enterprises and entrepreneurs. It promotes business development through a grants and contributions program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP).

Program Financial Resources,Endnote28 2014–15 (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
146,609,271 146,609,271 146,499,765 146,564,462 -44,809
Program Human Resources,Endnote29 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
143 121 -22
Program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Program 1.1: Business Development
Overall Results Performance

Number of projects supportedEndnote30

Actual spending

Share of CED’s G&C spending

743 projects

$131.7 million

62%Endnote31

Expected Final ResultsEndnote32 Performance Indicators Three-year Targets Cumulative ResultsEndnote33
The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed Rate of survivalEndnote34 of businesses supported in their startup 55% 84%
Rate of survival of businesses supported in their transfer N/AEndnote35
Quebec enterprises are competitive Rate of survival of businesses supported in their development 75% 96%

Performance Analysis and lessons Learned

CED’s performance in 2014–15 in the Business Development program exceeded expectations. In that regard, Statistics Canada’s study on net impactEndnotev supported these results, and confirmed that the cumulative survival rate of all cohorts shows that, five years after receiving funding, CED’s clients post a survival rate 7.8 percentage points higher than non-clients.

CED’s intervention in this program is identified as an organizational priority in 2014–15, and involves supporting the maintenance and growth of businesses. CED thus contributed to renewing the pool of enterprises and enhancing the competitiveness of existing enterprises:

2.2.1 Sub-program 1.1.1 – Entrepreneurship Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing the pool of enterprises in Quebec, where entrepreneurial dynamism is lower than in the rest of Canada.Endnote36 CED hopes to boost entrepreneurial dynamism throughout Quebec. It does so by encouraging business pre-startups and startups, and by supporting the survival of existing enterprises through succession planning and business transfers.

In this sub-program, CED provides support primarily to enterprises or non-profit organizations that support enterprises and entrepreneurs, such as entrepreneurship centres, incubators, and transfer and spinoff organizations. It contributes to entrepreneurship support through its grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote37 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
21,991,391 21,984,669 -6,722
Sub-program Human Resources, 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
21 20 -1
Sub-program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Results
Sub-program 1.1.1: Entrepreneurship Support
Enterprises are started up or transferred Percentage of enterprises started up 25%Endnote38 43%
Percentage of enterprises transferred

N/AEndnote39

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For FY 2014–15, CED fostered business growth and maintenance, one of its priorities, by focussing on projects to create and start up new enterprises.

CED considers that it fostered renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec during 2014–15. It supported the implementation of 114 projects to stimulate the creation of enterprises. CED’s financial assistance in entrepreneurship amounted to $13.2 million.

CED thus contributed to the fact that 43% of enterprises supported had started upEndnote40 in Quebec, thereby surpassing its target. As to the percentage of enterprises transferred, CED’s support is provided in particular for productivity and expansion projects in the Business Performance sub-program.

2.2.2 Sub-program 1.1.2 – Business Performance

Description

The goal of this sub-program (SP) is to increase Quebec enterprises’ performance and competitiveness. The productivity of the Quebec economy is lower than the average for the rest of Canada,Endnote41 and productivity gains can be achieved among other things through investment carried out by Quebec enterprises.

In fact, in the context of growing global competition, Quebec enterprises wishing to develop or ensure their survival have to innovate and convert their ideas into business opportunities, enhance their productivity and penetrate new markets.

CED accompanies enterprises from the different regions of Quebec to help them meet these challenges. It does so by encouraging them to invest to optimize their production and increase their efforts with respect to innovation, technology transfer, commercialization and exports. CED also assists in the structuring of business networks in which enterprises operate.

CED’s intervention in this sub-program is aimed primarily at enterprises and non-profit organizations that support enterprises. It helps business performance through a grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote42 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
124,617,880 124,579,793 -38,087
Sub-program Human Resources,Endnote43 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
122 101 -21
Sub-program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Results Performance Indicators Target Actual Result
Sub-program 1.1.2: Business Performance
Enterprises improve their performance Percentage of coached businesses that maintained or increased their sales figures or self-generated incomeEndnote44 65% 65%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

CED’s performance in the Business Performance sub-program fulfilled expectations. During 2014–15, CED supported 629 projects, investing $118.5 million to sustain the prosperity and competitiveness of Quebec enterprises.

CED intervenes directly with enterprises, and also reaches them indirectly, via NPOs. Through its action, CED contributed in 2014–15 to the development of more than 7,615 enterprises. Of that number:

CED continued its support for the two Canada Business Network service centres in Quebec, Info entrepreneurs in Montreal and Ressources entreprises in Quebec City, which provide information and referral services to guide entrepreneurs to specialized resources. In 2014–15, these centres responded to 23,280 information requests. CED’s financial support through its operating budget represents $1.9 million in total investment.

Also, 65% of the enterprises receiving support from CED in their projects to improve their performance saw their sales or self-generated revenue increase. More specifically, this proportion is:

Furthermore, Statistics Canada’s studyEndnotevi on net impact confirms that assistance from CED increases enterprises’ chances of success. From the first years following CED funding, enterprises receiving assistance average higher revenue growth, employment levels and productivity than the control group of comparable enterprises.

2.3 Program 1.2 – Regional Economic Development

Strategic Outcome #1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.2
REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Sub-program 1.2.1:
REGIONAL ENGAGEMENT

Sub-program 1.2.2:
REGIONAL INVESTMENT

 

Description

This program (P) is intended to strengthen the regions’ economic base so as to sustain the growth of Quebec’s economy. Quebec’s regions differ in, among other things, their industrial structure, and some are more sensitive to economic fluctuations. Quebec’s prosperity depends on the participation of the different regions in the economy to their full potential.

CED wishes to contribute to building strong, competitive regions. It does so by supporting local communities as they take charge of their economic development, and by stimulating investment in all Quebec regions.

In this program, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations active in economic development. It supports regional economic development through a grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Program Financial Resources,Endnote46 2014–15 (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities Available for Use Actual Spending DifferenceEndnote47
(Actual Minus Planned)
48,507,929 48,507,929 47,945,992 34,133,620 -14,374,309
Program Human Resources,Endnote48 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
16 20 4
Program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Program 1.2: Regional Economic Development
Overall Results Performance

Number of projects supported

Actual spending

Share of CED’s G&C spending

103 projets

32 million

15%

Expected Final Result Performance Indicators Three-year Targets Cumulative ResultsEndnote49
Quebec regions have a stronger economic base Total amount of investment generated in regions supported that completed the implementation of their development projectEndnote50 $90M 64.2M$Endnote51
Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported 9B$ $10.2B
Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported $1.8B $3.7B

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance obtained in 2014–15 under the Regional Economic Development program partially meets expectations, and indicates that CED’s intervention is in line with its priorities.

During FY 2014–15, CED placed greater emphasis on its two priorities, supporting the maintenance and growth of businesses, as well as contributing to strengthening the economies of communities and regions through targeted and/or temporary support. It thus reallocated its resources in the Strengthening Community Economies program.

During 2014–15, CED invested $32 million in 103 projects to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions.

CED contributed to creating new opportunities in Quebec regions by building on their respective assets. Since April 1, 2012, CED and its project-partner fund providers generated $64.2 millionEndnote52 in the regions by encouraging local communities to carry out their projects and acquire the community economic facilities necessary for their development.

CED also contributed to attracting tourists to the different regions of Quebec from other provinces and outside Canada. The latest dataEndnote53 show that tourists spent $3.5 billion in Quebec in 2013, up slightly from 2012 ($3.4 billion). CED has exceeded the cumulative goal of $9 billion that it set for March 31, 2015.

CED fostered the attraction of investment from foreign firms and international agencies. Since 2012–13, it has contributed to attracting $3.7 billion in investment, thus surpassing its goal set for March 31, 2015. This performance is attributable to the establishment and expansion in Greater Montreal of several subsidiaries of foreign corporations. This foreign direct investment was primarily concentrated in high-technology industries, thus supporting the region’s productivity and competitiveness.Endnote54

2.3.1 Sub-program 1.2.1 – Regional Engagement

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at supporting local communities as they take charge of their development so as to strengthen the economic base of Quebec’s regions. Local empowerment with regard to local economic development and the synergy with which stakeholders interact are success factors in eliciting the establishment of growth-generating projects.

CED sustains the growth and diversification of Quebec communities by supporting engagement and joint action by the various stakeholders, planning of their economic development, canvassing, pursuit of funding and implementation of structuring, recovery or diversification initiatives.

In this sub-program, CED intervenes primarily through non-profit organizations with an economic role. It supports Regional Engagement through a grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote55 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
4,850,793 3,413,362 -1,437,431
Sub-program Human Resources, 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
8 4 -4
Sub-program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Result
Sub-program 1.2.1: Regional Engagement
Communities take charge of their economic development Percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization projectsEndnote56 40% 29%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In order to meet communities’ needs, in line with its priorities, CED concentrated its intervention on the Business Development and Strengthening Community Economies programs, thereby supporting a large number of communities, to boost their economies and foster their development. Information on the performance of these programs may be found in the sections of the Report dedicated to them.

CED approved three new projects aimed at regional engagement in 2014–15.

Also, CED continued its financial support for communities by investing $3.1 million in 24 previously approved projects falling under Regional Engagement.

Under this sub-program, CED also supports the implementation of recovery and diversification plans and of projects stemming from those plans. Thus, of the 14 communities receiving financial support from CED in 2014–15 for projects aimed at their engagement and development, four implemented projects arising from planning, or 29% of the communities supported.

2.3.2 Sub-program 1.2.2 – Regional Investment

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at increasing investment in the different regions of Quebec so as to strengthen their economic activity base. Quebec’s regions are faced with global competition, and have to stand out to attract investment needed to maximize their economic growth.Endnote57

Quebec must build on its current strengths, such as access to the North American market, a diversified economy, niches of excellence, skilled workers, an enviable quality of life, abundant resources, a distinctive tourism offering, and more besides.

CED supports regions in their efforts to acquire the equipment necessary to harness their assets in order to stimulate business and generate economic spinoffs. It also does so by enhancing promotion of regional assets with a view to increasing tourist spending and the attraction of foreign direct investment through foreign firms and international organizations.

In this sub-program, CED focusses on non-profit organizations. It supports Regional Investment through a grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote58 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending DifferenceEndnote59
(Actual Minus Planned)
43,657,136 30,720,258 -12,936,878
Sub-program Human Resources, 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources DifferenceEndnote60
(Actual Minus Planned)
8 16 8
Sub-program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Results
Sub-program 1.2.2: Regional Investment
Quebec regions attract investment Percentage of communities supported which implement community economic facility projects 75% 100%
Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions 5.9M 6.5M
Number of international organizations and foreign enterprises maintained, in expansion or attracted to the regions supported 30 50

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

In 2014–15, performance in the Regional Investment sub-program exceeded expectations. CED contributed to the competitive positioning of the different regions of Quebec, to help them become more attractive and open to the world. It funded 79 projects, to the tune of $28.9 million, to stimulate different forms of investment in Quebec.

In that regard, the Project to Implement the Eeyou Istchee Broadband Communications Network (ECN) Case StudyEndnotevii concluded that specific and targeted programs are necessary to support remote areas in their growth-generating projects.

In this sub-program, CED supports, in particular, the planning and implementation of community economic facility projects. Thus, the four communities which received financial support from CED in 2014–15 for community economic facility projects carried out projects stemming from planning (100% of the communities supported).

CED also fostered the international outreach of Quebec’s regional economic assets. It supported the commercialization of destinations or major events, such as festivals, to increase the number of tourists visiting and generate economic spinoffs within communities. According to the latest data,Endnote61 an average of some 6.5 million tourists a year from outside Quebec visited the province’s different regions.

CED contributed, through Montreal International and Quebec International, to maintaining in or attracting to Quebec 50 foreign firms and international organizations in 2014–15.Endnote62

2.4 Program 1.3 – Strengthening Community Economies

Strategic Outcome #1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.3
STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

Sub-program 1.3.1:
COMMUNITY FUTURES PROGRAM

Sub-program 1.3.2:
INFRASTRUCTURE MODERNIZATION

Sub-program 1.3.3:
TARGETED AND/OR TEMPORARY SUPPORT

 

Description

In addition to its regular programs, CED develops, administers and implements Canada-wide programs or targeted and/or temporary initiatives. The common objective is strengthening community economies, in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

CED thus supports communities’ economic development and ensures sound, effective management of infrastructure programs in Quebec. CED also supports economic activity in Quebec communities that are sustaining economic shocks, experiencing significant development challenges, or grasping long-term business opportunities.

This program is directed at enterprises and non-profit organizations. CED uses dedicated, temporary or permanent additional funding from the Government of Canada, or specific funds which it allocates via the QEDP. It also intervenes by means of a permanent fund dedicated to the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Program Financial Resources,Endnote63 2014–15 (dollars)
Main Estimates Planned Spending Authorities Actual Spending DifferenceEndnote64
(Actual Minus Planned)
38,816,648 38,816,648 46,333,260 55,328,034 16,511,386
Program Human ResourcesEndnote65 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual Minus Planned)
29 47 18
Program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Program 1.3: Strengthening Community Economies
Overall Results Performance

Number of projects supportedEndnote66

Number of Canada-wide programs and temporary initiatives implementedEndnote67

Actual spending

Share of CED’s spending

237 projects

8

 

$48.5 million

23%

Expected Final Result Performance Indicators Three-year Targets Cumulative Results
Quebec communities have stronger economies Value of total investment generated in communities: $770.3M $776.6MEndnote68
  • Community Futures Program
744M$ $730.4M
  • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative 2013-2018
$6.8M $6.9M
  • Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
$19.5M $15.1M

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Under the Strengthening Community Economies program, CED attained most of its results targets as of March 2015. In 2014–15, it implemented targeted and/or temporary initiatives, as well as a Canada-wide initiative, and administered a fund for Infrastructure Canada.

CED’s intervention to strengthen community economies generated total investment of $776.6 million.Endnote69

Through the Community Futures Program, CED provided 56 CFDCs and 10 BDCs with financial support. During FY 2014–15, it supported implementation of 1,463 projects involving investment totalling $730.4 million in the communities receiving assistance.

Through Canada-wide EDI, CED contributed to stimulating the economic development of English-speaking communities (i.e., official language minority communities (OLMCs) in Quebec). In 2014–15, under this initiative, CED supported 12 projects involving $6.9 million in total investment in the communities backed, thus surpassing the planned performance target.

Under the Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, CED contributed to supporting the economic transition of communities in Des Appalaches and Des Sources regional county municipalities (RCMs), which are dependent on the chrysotile aluminum industry, toward the secondary and tertiary sectors. CED supported 18 projects, nine of which were completed in 2014–15, involving investment totalling $15.1 million in communities.

Under the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, CED fostered that community’s economic and commercial recovery by deploying a dedicated team in the field to accompany local stakeholders in their economic development efforts. CED supported 13 projects, five of which were completed in 2014–15, involving total investment of $18.8 million in the community.

Under the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec, CED contributed to supporting the sustainability and dynamism of the forestry sector and the health of Canada’s forests, which are vital to communities tied to that industry. This year, it invested $1.5 million in the Société de protection des forêts contre les insectes et les maladies (SOPFIM) to help control the spruce budworm infestation in the Bas-Saint-Laurent, Gaspésie and Côte-Nord regions.

Through its activities under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED also implemented two new initiatives to contribute to strengthening community economies:

CED’s support through the Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings on Forest Multi-use Roads in Wildlife Areas helped encourage the restoration of watercourse crossings and ensure the improvement, rehabilitation and maintenance of these multi-use roads in wildlife areas. In 2014–15, $1.5 million was invested in project implementation through this Canada-Quebec Agreement.

CED also implemented the Local Investment Initiative. It funded projects to support local investment in all Quebec regions by encouraging the rehabilitation, upgrading or expansion of existing community halls, accessible to the public on a non-commercial basis. In 2014–15, CED supported 120 projects involving $5.4 million in total investment in communities.

2.4.1 Sub-program 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at assisting local economic development in rural areas in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec communities. It implements a national program also called the Community Futures Program (CFP).

The CFP plays an important role in strengthening rural communities’ ability to diversify their economic base so as to foster long-term prosperity and sustainability.

Through the CFP, CED encourages Quebec rural communities’ planning and socioeconomic development, access to capital, availability of consulting services and support for local projects.

CED delivers the CFP in Quebec with the help of Community Futures Development Corporations and Business Development Centres, under contribution agreements.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote70 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual vs. Planned)
30,367,433 29,819,011 -548,422
Sub-program Human Resources, 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual vs. planned)
10 12 2
Sub-program, Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Results
Sub-program 1.3.1: Community Futures Program (CFP)
Communities are economically sustainable Number of economic development initiatives implemented in communities following support to CFDCs 315 553
Percentage of entrepreneurs undertaking pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise with support from CFDCs and BDCs 60% 69%
Percentage of enterprises carrying out recovery, expansion or modernization projects with support from CFDCs and BDCs 73% 89%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

The performance obtained in the Community Futures Program sub-program surpassed expectations in 2014–15. CED delivers the CFP in Quebec through Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs), under contribution agreements.

In 2014–15, CED provided financial support for 56 CFDCs located in designated rural regions, as well as 10 BDCs in peri-urban areas. During FY 2014–15, CED paid some $28.4 million to those organizations to help them carry out 1,463 projects to strengthen the economy of Quebec’s rural communities.

Through the CFDCs, CED surpassed its results targets as of March 31, 2015. CFDCs implemented 553 economic development initiatives in communities, exceeding the target of 315 initiatives. With the assistance of CFDCs and BDCs, 69% of entrepreneurs supported carried out the pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise, while 89% of enterprises carried out their recovery, expansion or modernization projects.

The Summative Evaluation of the Business Startup and Succession Fund and the Business Support FundEndnoteviii performed in 2013–14 presented positive results as to the impact of the assistance provided to enterprises by the CFDCs, and revealed that not only did the two initiatives meet enterprises’ funding needs, but that few if any similar offerings catered to the issues targeted by these initiatives. With a total budget envelope of $28.3 million, the Funds led to the creation of 139 jobs and the maintenance of 685 jobs. Moreover, the sales figures of close to 75% of the enterprises sampled in the evaluation increased.

A study conducted by Statistics CanadaEndnote71 showed that enterprises supported by CFDCs perform better in terms of employment growth, survival rate, level of sales, and productivity, compared with a similar control group not receiving such support.

2.4.2 Sub-program 1.3.2 – Infrastructure Modernization

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at ensuring sound and effective management of infrastructure programs in order to strengthen the economy of Quebec’s communities. Quality public infrastructure is a key factor in economic development.

CED acts as Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner for the administration in Quebec of the Building Canada Fund (Communities and Large Urban Centres components).Endnote72

These programs are the subject of agreements between Infrastructure Canada and the Quebec government and are aimed primarily at municipalities.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote73 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending Difference
(Actual vs. Planned)
1,528,865 472,312 -1,056,553
Sub-program Human Resources,Endnote74 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Actual vs. Planned)
14 5 -9
Sub-program, Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Results Performance Indicator Target Result
Sub-program 1.3.2: Infrastructure Modernization
Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure Number of communities that have at their disposal completed public infrastructure under the terms of the contribution agreement

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

During FY 2014–15, CED continued to work with Infrastructure Canada under the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program to ensure the implementation in Quebec of the Building Canada Fund (Communities and Large Urban Centres components) so that Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure.

Performance highlights with respect to the various infrastructure programs may be found in Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Performance Reports.Endnote75

2.4.3 Sub-program 1.3.3 – Targeted and/or Temporary Support

Description

This sub-program (SP) is aimed at providing targeted and/or temporary support for Quebec communities’ economic activity in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies. The shifting context requires a real-time response that is geared to the most pressing local needs and consistent with specific government priorities.

CED can thus provide support for Quebec communities facing economic shocks, natural disasters or situations that can have an adverse impact on their economic development, and that are facing serious economic development issues or are presented with development opportunities likely to have a positive impact on the regions.

This sub-program is aimed primarily at enterprises and NPOs. CED intervenes through temporary or dedicated additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds which the Agency allocates through a grants and contributions program, the QEDP.

Sub-program Financial Resources,Endnote76 2014–15 (dollars)
Planned Spending Actual Spending DifferenceEndnote77
(Actual vs. Planned)
6,920,350 25,036,711 18,116,361
Sub-program Human Resources, 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources DifferenceEndnote78
(Actual vs. Planned)
5 30 25
Sub-program Performance Measurement, 2014–15
Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Results
Sub-program 1.3.3: Targeted and/or Temporary Support
Communities have temporary support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies Percentage of communities that benefit from temporary support, by initiative:Endnote79
  • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative 2013-2018
19% 23%
  • Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
100% 100%
  • Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic
100% 100%

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

For 2014–15, the performance of the Targeted and/or Temporary Support sub-program met expectations. CED paid $20 million to support implementation of 166 projects within the framework of targeted and/or temporary initiatives to cater in real time to local needs, CED’s priorities, and government priorities. In this way, it provided temporary support for economic activity in all the communities targeted in order to stabilize or strengthen their economies.

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 2013–2018

The communities supported under EDI 2013–2018 are Quebec’s English-speaking communities, i.e., official language minority communities (OLMCs).

Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic

Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec

Through its activities under the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), CED also implemented two new initiatives to contribute to strengthening community economies:

Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings on Forest Multi-use Roads in Wildlife Areas

Local Investment Initiative

2.5 Program 1.4 – Internal Services

Strategic Outcome #1
QUEBEC'S REGIONS HAVE A GROWING ECONOMY

Program 1.4
INTERNAL SERVICES

No sub-program

 

Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. The groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Management Services; Materiel Management Services; Acquisition Management Services; Travel Management Services and Other Administrative Services. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. They lead to higher efficiency in program delivery, thus contributing to quality services for Canadians.

Program Financial Resources,Endnote80 2014–15 (dollars)
Estimates Planned Spending AuthoritiesEndnote81 Actual Spending Difference
(Actual minus planned)
13,906,770 13,906,770 15,995,281 17,871,800 3,965,030
Program Human Resources,Endnote82 2014–15 (Full-time Equivalents – FTEs)
Planned Resources Actual Resources Difference
(Planned vs. actual)
120 127 7

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Actual use of human resources within the Internal Services program corresponds to the operational needs associated with that program.

The difference observed from the forecast is particularly attributable to the continuation and accelerated implementation of modernization initiatives to support CED program delivery and contribute to providing Canadians with quality services.

Section III - Supplementary Information

3.1 Financial Statements Highlights

The financial highlights presented below provide an overview of the financial position and operations of Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED). The unaudited financial statements are drawn up in accordance with government accounting policies, which are based on Canadian generally accepted accounting principles for the public sector.

Note that the spending presented in the tables in Sections I and II of the Report were prepared on a cash basis, while the financial highlights that follow were prepared on an accrual basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to CED’s financial statements.

A more detailed statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net costs of operations to the requested authorities, can be found on the CED’s website.Endnote83

3.1.1 Condensed Statement of Operations

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)
For the year ended March 31, 2015 (dollars)
Endnoteix
Financial Information 2014–15
Planned Results
2014–15
Actual
2013–14
Actual
Difference
(2014–15 actual minus 2014–15 planned)
Difference
(2014–15 actual minus 2013–14 actual)
Total expensesEndnote84 173,978,000 151,447,431 184,836,195 (22,530,569) (33,388,764)
Total revenues 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 173,978,000 151,447,431 184,836,195 (22,530,569) (33,388,764)

Expenses

Revenues

3.1.2 Condensed Statement of Financial Position

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2015 (dollars)
Financial Information 2014–15 2013–14 Difference
(2014–15 Minus 2013–14)
Total net liabilities 35,554,488 33,572,155 1,982,333
Total net financial assets 32,317,420 30,396,774 1,920,646
Departmental net debt 3,237,068 3,175,381 61,687
Total non-financial assets 1,081,487 811,076 270,411
Departmental net financial position (2,155,581) (2,364,305) 208,724

Liabilities

Assets

3.2 Financial Statements

CED’s unaudited financial statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2015 and the Core Control Audit report produced by the Office of the Comptroller General of Canada along with the related Management Action Plan are available on CED's website.Endnotex

3.3 Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the Departmental Performance Report 2014–15 can be found on CED's website.Endnote85

3.4 Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures, such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in Tax Expenditures and Evaluations.Endnotexi. The tax measures presented in that publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Section IV : Organizational Contact Information

Canada Economic Development for the Regions of Quebec

Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec H3B 2T9
CANADA

Telephone: 514-283-6412
Fax: 514-283-3302

Website: Export Development Canada

Additional Information

The following information may be found on CED’s website:

Appendix - Definitions

Appropriation:
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Budgetary Expenditures:
Include operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report:
Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

Full-time Equivalent:
Is a measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada Outcomes:
A set of 16 high-level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure:
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

Non-Budgetary Expenditures:
Include net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

Performance:
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve and how well lessons learned have been identified.

Performance Indicator:
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

Performance Reporting:
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

Planned Spending:
For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

Plans:
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

Priorities:
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

Program:
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture:
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities:
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three-year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Results:
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

Statutory Expenditures:
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome:
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

Sunset Program:
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

Target:
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

Voted Expenditures:
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Whole-of-Government Framework:
Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government-wide, high-level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

Endnotes

Endnote i

Whole-of-Government Framework

Return to endnote i referrer

Endnote ii

Public Accounts of Canada 2015

Return to endnote ii referrer

Endnote iii

Public Works and Government Services Canada website

Return to endnote iii referrer

Endnote iv

Information on data sources, their processing and reliability is available in the supplementary tables on the CED website (See Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data)

Return to endnote iv referrer

Endnote v

Statistics Canada (2013), Economic Impact Study from 2001 to 2010

Return to endnote v referrer

Endnote vi

Statistics Canada (2013), Economic Impact Study from 2001 to 2010

Return to endnote vi referrer

Endnote vii

Project to Implement the Eeyou Istchee Broadband Communications Network (ECN) Case Study

Return to endnote vii referrer

Endnote viii

Summative Evaluation of Initiatives: Startup and Succession and Business Support

Return to endnote viii referrer

Endnote ix

Future-oriented Financial Statements (Unaudited) As at March 31, 2014 and 2015

Return to endnote ix referrer

Endnote x

CED’s Financial Statements

Return to endnote x referrer

Endnote xi

Government of Canada Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

Return to endnote xi referrer

Endnotes

Endnote 1

To consult the text of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act.

Return to endnote 1 referrer

Endnote 2

To consult the text of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act

Return to endnote 2 referrer

Endnote 3

CED’s Economic Development Index consists of many variables, such as the participation rate, level of entrepreneurship, level of exporting establishments, value of building permits, diversification of the industrial structure, productivity, and more besides.

Return to endnote 3 referrer

Endnote 4

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories (ETs).

Return to endnote 4 referrer

Endnote 5

To consult the list of CED’s business offices, visit: Our business offices.

Return to endnote 5 referrer

Endnote 6

Visit CED’s website

Return to endnote 6 referrer

Endnote 7

CED contributes to the design, administration or implementation in Quebec of nationwide grants and contributions (G&C) programs and temporary initiatives. For further details concerning these programs and initiatives, visit CED’s website and the supplementary tables on transfer payments.

Return to endnote 7 referrer

Endnote 8

For further details on this program, visit the Infrastructure Canada website

Return to endnote 8 referrer

Endnote 9

Some minor, administrative changes have been made in CED’s PAA since 2012.

Return to endnote 9 referrer

Endnote 10

Note that a grant and contributions (G&C) program or a transfer payment program does not correspond to a program or sub program in the PAA.

Return to endnote 10 referrer

Endnote 11

CED has identified 68 RCMs with slow economic growth, targeted on the basis of its Economic Development Index. For a list of these RCMs, visit: List of RCMs with slow economic growth.

Return to endnote 11 referrer

Endnote 12

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 12 referrer

Endnote 13

Main Estimates are tabled in Parliament prior to the start of the fiscal year. Planned spending refers to expenditures published in the Report on Plans and Priorities, and is based on the reference level update. It comprises the Main Estimates as well as any additional authorities at the time of publication of the RPP.

Total authorities represent the sum of Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates up to March 31, 2015. This amount corresponds to total authorities as indicated in the Public Accounts for the year ending March 31, 2015.

CED’s actual spending corresponds to actual expenditures as indicated in the Public Accounts.

Return to endnote 13 referrer

Endnote 14

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, operating expenditures and statutory items. Internal services include only operating expenditures and statutory items.

Return to endnote 14 referrer

Endnote 15

The $13.2M difference observed between FYs 2014–15 and 2015–16 is primarily attributable to the reprofiling of funds in 2015–16 for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, allocation of funding for the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec, and an increase in repayable contributions collected from our clients in 2015–16.
The difference between FYs 2015–16 and 2016–17 is attributable to the reinvestment of clients’ repayable contributions in the 2015–16 contributions budget, which is not included in planned spending for 2016–17, since the authority has not been granted at this stage.

Return to endnote 15 referrer

Endnote 16

Main Estimates are tabled in Parliament prior to the start of the fiscal year. Planned spending refers to expenditures published in the Report on Plans and Priorities, and is based on the reference level update. It comprises the Main Estimates as well as any additional authorities at the time of publication of the RPP.
Total authorities represent the sum of Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates up to March 31, 2015. This amount corresponds to total authorities as indicated in the Public Accounts for the year ending March 31, 2015.
CED’s actual spending corresponds to actual expenditures as indicated in the Public Accounts.

Return to endnote 16 referrer

Endnote 17

CED’s programs are the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) and the Community Futures Program (CFP).

Return to endnote 17 referrer

Endnote 18

CED’s sunset programs between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2018 include: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec's Forest Economies, Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund, Initiative for International Cruise Development, Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec, and Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile.

Return to endnote 18 referrer

Endnote 19

Actual spending covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15.

Return to endnote 19 referrer

Endnote 20

Planned spending covers the period from 2015–16 to 2017–18.

Return to endnote 20 referrer

Endnote 21

The total number of projects supported corresponds to projects for which expenditures were made by CED during a given period. The above result excludes projects associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 21 referrer

Endnote 22

The total number of projects approved corresponds to projects newly approved by CED over a given period. Projects associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program are reflected in Infrastructure Canada’s Departmental Performance Report.

Return to endnote 22 referrer

Endnote 23

The leverage effect compares financial assistance approved by CED with funding from promoters and other sources. The above result excludes funding associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 23 referrer

Endnote 24

Not applicable. In line with CED's Performance Measurement Framework (PMF), performance indicators concerning the organization’s strategic outcome are monitored and measured every five years. These data will be available on April 1, 2017.

Return to endnote 24 referrer

Endnote 25

By “communities,” CED means Quebec’s 104 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and equivalent territories (ETs).

Return to endnote 25 referrer

Endnote 26

Measured by the progression of the economic variables in CED’s Economic Development Index (e.g., participation rate, level of entrepreneurship and exporting establishments, value of building permits, productivity, etc.).

Return to endnote 26 referrer

Endnote 27

This involves CED’s efforts in connection with the Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy. For further information on the Policy, please consult: The Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy.

Return to endnote 27 referrer

Endnote 28

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 28 referrer

Endnote 29

The difference between actual and planned use of FTEs is attributable to the adjustment of resource allocation among the programs in CED’s PAA as stated in the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) in 2014–15. The Strengthening Community Economies program was in greater demand in 2014–15 than had been anticipated.

Return to endnote 29 referrer

Endnote 30

The total number of projects supported corresponds to projects for which expenditures were made by CED during a given period.

Return to endnote 30 referrer

Endnote 31

This percentage excludes operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 31 referrer

Endnote 32

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.
The results targets for these indicators are cumulative and were set as at March 31, 2015. The results are therefore cumulative, and cover the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. (See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.) Also, these targets were adjusted upward in the RPP 2015–16 to reflect more accurately the survival rate of enterprises supported by CED.

Return to endnote 32 referrer

Endnote 33

The results targets for these indicators are cumulative and were set as at March 31, 2015. The results are therefore cumulative, and cover the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. (See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.) Also, these targets were adjusted upward in the RPP 2015–16 to reflect more accurately the survival rate of enterprises supported by CED.

Return to endnote 33 referrer

Endnote 34

Survival rates for businesses are measured three years after funding from CED ends.

Return to endnote 34 referrer

Endnote 35

No direct assistance was awarded in 2014–15 for business succession and transfer projects, but CED supported enterprises in succession and transfer mode through the Business Performance sub-program. This indicator has been withdrawn from the 2015–16 Performance Management Framework.

Return to endnote 35 referrer

Endnote 36

Fondation de l’entrepreneurship (2014), Indice entrepreneurial québécois : Qu’est-ce qui motive nos jeunes à faire le grand saut? (Quebec’s entrepreneurial index: What motivates our young people to take the plunge?,
“The percentage of the population expressing their intention of one day creating a new enterprise or taking on an existing one was 19.1% in Quebec and 27.6% in the rest of Canada in 2014.”

Return to endnote 36 referrer

Endnote 37

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 37 referrer

Endnote 38

The target from the RPP 2015–16 has been raised to reflect the upward trend in renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec.

Return to endnote 38 referrer

Endnote 39

No direct assistance was awarded for business succession and transfer projects, but CED supported enterprises in succession and transfer mode through the Business Performance sub-program.

Return to endnote 39 referrer

Endnote 40

An enterprise has started up when it has been in operation for at least one year and is generating income amounting to at least 80% of its expenditures.

Return to endnote 40 referrer

Endnote 41

Centre sur la productivité et la prospérité, HEC Montréal (2014), Productivity and Prosperity in Quebec: 2014 Overview
Labour productivity, which measures the value of the wealth created per hour worked, was $55.40 in Quebec and $61.44 in Canada in 2013. Average annual labour productivity growth was 1.04% in Quebec and 1.18% in Canada between 1981 and 2013.

Return to endnote 41 referrer

Endnote 42

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 42 referrer

Endnote 43

The difference between CED’s actual and planned use of FTEs is attributable to the adjustment of resource allocation among the programs in its PAA as stated in the RPP 2014–15. The Strengthening Community Economies program was in greater demand in 2014–15 than had been anticipated.

Return to endnote 43 referrer

Endnote 44

With a view to improving the quality and reliability of performance data, the indicators on sales and self-generated revenue have been merged. CED made this correction in its Performance Management Framework 2014–15.

Return to endnote 44 referrer

Endnote 45

The term “structuring” is used to mean a network bringing together all the stakeholders which decides to acquire a governance structure to develop planned, concerted action on the strategic issues that concern them.

Return to endnote 45 referrer

Endnote 46

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 46 referrer

Endnote 47

The difference of approximately $14M is attributable to the fact that part of the funding originally provided for was used instead to fund initiatives under the Strengthening Community Economies program, such as the implementation of priority activities to fund projects for upgrading local facilities, the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, and the Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings on Forest Multi-use Roads in Wildlife Areas.

Return to endnote 47 referrer

Endnote 48

Renewal of all the multi-year agreements with tourism and sectoral associations, several NPOs, and recurring major festivals meant that additional resources were needed in the Promotion of Assets component in 2014–15 compared with previous years.

Return to endnote 48 referrer

Endnote 49

Targets are cumulative and were set as at March 31, 2015. Results are therefore cumulative, and cover the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15.

Return to endnote 49 referrer

Endnote 50

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.

Return to endnote 50 referrer

Endnote 51

The result achieved was below the performance expected ($90M). The difference is attributable to the smaller number of projects completed in 2014–15 in line with CED’s priorities (only five new projects in 2014–15, compared with a total of 41 projects for the previous two years), for a lower total cost (average of $450,000 in 2014–15, compared with $1.5M for the previous two years).

Return to endnote 51 referrer

Endnote 52

The cumulative result for the target is $64.2M calculated over the period from April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2015.

Return to endnote 52 referrer

Endnote 53

Tourisme Québec, Les plus récentes données sur le tourisme au Québec (dernière mise à jour : 17 juin 2015) (Latest Data on Tourism in Quebec [Latest update: June 17, 2015]).

Return to endnote 53 referrer

Endnote 54

Montreal International (2014), 2014 Activity Report and Quebec International (2014), 2014 Annual Report.

Return to endnote 54 referrer

Endnote 55

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 55 referrer

Endnote 56

See supplementary tables: Appendix 1 – Technical Notes on Performance Data.

Return to endnote 56 referrer

Endnote 57

Centre sur la productivité et la prospérité, HEC Montréal (2010), Ouverture aux investissements directs étrangers et productivité au Canada (Openness to Foreign Direct Investment and Productivity in Canada).

Return to endnote 57 referrer

Endnote 58

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 58 referrer

Endnote 59

The difference between actual and planned spending is attributable to the fact that part of the funding originally provided for was used instead to fund initiatives under the Strengthening Community Economies program.

Return to endnote 59 referrer

Endnote 60

Renewal of all the multi-year agreements with tourism and sectoral associations, several NPOs, and recurring major festivals meant that additional resources were needed in the Promotion of Assets component in 2014–15 compared with previous years. The sums associated with these new projects will primarily be spent beginning in 2015–16.

Return to endnote 60 referrer

Endnote 61

Tourisme Québec, Les plus récentes données sur le tourisme au Québec (dernière mise à jour : 17 juin 2015) (Latest Data on Tourism in Quebec [Latest update: June 17, 2015]).

Return to endnote 61 referrer

Endnote 62

Montreal International (2014), 2014 Activity Report and Quebec International (2014), 2014 Annual Report.

Return to endnote 62 referrer

Endnote 63

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 63 referrer

Endnote 64

The difference of approximately $16.5M between actual and planned spending is attributable to the fact that, when the RPP 2014–15 was released, the yearly budgets were not yet known for certain initiatives, including the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic and the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec.

Return to endnote 64 referrer

Endnote 65

The difference of 18 FTEs between actual and planned use is primarily attributable to the implementation of new initiatives which were not provided for in the RPP 2014–15.

Return to endnote 65 referrer

Endnote 66

The above result excludes projects associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 66 referrer

Endnote 67

The Canada-wide and temporary programs implemented by CED are: Community Futures Program (CFP), Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI), Canadian Economic Diversification Initiative for Communities Reliant on Chrysotile, Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic, Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec, Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings on Forest Multi-use Roads in Wildlife Areas, and Local Investment Initiative.

Return to endnote 67 referrer

Endnote 68

The overall result includes the results for the Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac Mégantic ($18.8M) and the Local Investment Initiative ($5.4M), for which no target had been set in 2014–15.

Return to endnote 68 referrer

Endnote 69

The above result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. It excludes projects associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 69 referrer

Endnote 70

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 70 referrer

Endnote 71

Statistics Canada’s third study on the CFP (2013).

Return to endnote 71 referrer

Endnote 72

CED is responsible for monitoring the use of funds on behalf of the federal government. It is also in charge of verifying project compliance with the standards set out in the signed Framework Agreements and program terms and conditions.

Return to endnote 72 referrer

Endnote 73

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to endnote 73 referrer

Endnote 74

Actual use in FTEs for FY 2014–15 was similar to 2013–14 (4 FTEs) and to planned spending and FTE use as set out in the RPP 2015–16.

Return to endnote 74 referrer

Endnote 75

See Infrastructure Canada’s website.

Return to endnote 75 referrer

Endnote 76

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures, and operating expenditures.

Return to endnote 76 referrer

Endnote 77

The difference of approximately $18M is primarily attributable to the additional operating expenditures and grants and contributions expenditures for funding new projects and initiatives not provided for in the RPP 2014–15, such as the Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec (SICSBOQ) and the Local Investment Initiative.

Return to endnote 77 referrer

Endnote 78

A resource allocation adjustment was carried out to leverage the necessary FTEs, in order to analyse principally projects leading to the upgrading of local facilities in line with local needs.

Return to endnote 78 referrer

Endnote 79

For further details concerning the Canada-wide EDI initiative, the two temporary initiatives and the CIIF, see CED’s website.

Return to endnote 79 referrer

Endnote 80

This chart includes operating expenditures only.

Return to endnote 80 referrer

Endnote 81

Parliamentary authorities are awarded by global vote. So authorities by PAA program are estimates, and are presented as a guide only.

Return to endnote 81 referrer

Endnote 82

The planned FTEs in the Internal Services program are broken down according to the definition of internal services provided by the Treasury Board Secretariat in the Profile of Government of Canada Internal Services. As agreed with the TBS, however, CED’s Management and Monitoring Services group, as with Canada’s other regional development agencies, excludes design and management of programs, policies, standards and guidelines, and government relations.

Return to endnote 82 referrer

Endnote 83

See CED’s website.

Return to endnote 83 referrer

Endnote 84

Expenses reflect the economic resources used by CED during a period to deliver the programs in its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA), and are of two types: (i) transfer payments; and (ii) operating expenses. Expenses calculated in the context of the Future-oriented Statement of Operations (Section III) differ from those presented in sections I and II of the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP), since unconditionally repayable contributions are not accounted for as loans, thus reducing total transfer payment expenses.

Return to endnote 84 referrer

Endnote 85

See CED’s website.

Return to endnote 85 referrer

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2014–15 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the CED website.

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government’s Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–2016, tabled on November 4, 2013, presents the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA, to make the environmental decision-making process more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) supports implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this supplementary information table.

The Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the results for commitments for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality, within the context of the 2013–2016 FSDS.

2. Themes I–III: Department/Agency-led Targets

CED does not lead any FSDS targets.

3. Themes I–III: Implementation Strategies

The DSDS is implemented through CED’s regular grants and contributions (G&C) program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP), through which CED supports the development of enterprises and regions.

As shown in the table below, CED’s intervention with respect to FSDS Theme I comes under the Business Development program in the Program Activity Architecture (PAA). Implementation of greening of operations (Theme IV) is carried out under the Internal Services program in the PAA.

Strategic Outcome

PAA Program

Sub-program

 

Quebec's regions have a growing economy

Business development (1.1)

 

Internal Services (1.4)

  • Entrepreneurship Support (1.1.1)
  • Business Performance (1.1.2)
 

Under Theme I, CED undertakes to fund projects that would, among other things, help optimize resource use, enhance residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency. For instance, CED supports industrial greening projects (e.g., eco-design, eco-efficiency, green energy sources and eco-building) in order to help enterprises meet new requirements (e.g., eco-certification), identify pathways for enhancing environmental performance, and seize emerging (green) sector market opportunities.

Implementation Strategy and FSDS Targets

CED’s undertaking to “fund projects that would, among other things, help optimize resource use, enhance residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency” ties in with FSDS Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality.

Fulfilment of this undertaking should contribute to the attainment of FSDS targets 1.1 (Climate Change Mitigation) and 2.1 (Air Pollutants). CED’s grants and contributions (G&C) management system is geared to collecting information on projects that contribute to the attainment of these goals.

Activities Conducive to DSDS Implementation

In order to implement the DSDS, CED has conducted the following activities:

Information

Co-ordination and liaison

Reporting

Strategic environmental assessment (SEA)

Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA)

Communications

Program funding and delivery

Performance Summary for 2014-15

The table below shows target outcomes, performance indicators, targets and results for 2014–15 compared with established targets.

 
Target Outcome Performance Indicators Targets* Result 2014–15* Contribution to FSDS Target
Businesses are started up or transferred within a sustainable development perspective Percentage of businesses starting up or being transferred within a sustainable development perspective (out of the total number of businesses started up or transferred) N/A 13%

Climate Change Mitigation

Air Pollutants

Businesses improve their performance within a sustainable development perspective Percentage of businesses working to improve their performance within a sustainable development perspective (out of the total number of businesses working to improve their performance) N/A 7%

Climate Change Mitigation

Air Pollutants

* For reference, the targets established in the RPP 2015–16 are 15% for businesses started up or transferred, and 10% for businesses working to improve their performance. CED will report on these targets in the DSDS supplementary table for 2015–16. The results for 2014–15 were calculated in line with the methodology for calculating targets for 2015–16.

Targets could be revised once the FSDS 2016–2019 comes into effect.

4. Theme IV: Implementation Strategies

Target 7.2: Green Procurement
As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.
Planned Outcome
Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.
Performance Indicator Performance Level Attained
Departmental approach to further implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place. Actual date: March 31, 2015
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent. Number: 6
Percentage: 100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year. Number: 6
Percentage: 100%
Departmental Green Procurement Target
Performance Indicator Performance Level Attained
By March 31, 2017, 90% of purchases of imaging hardware will include criteria to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production, acquisition, use and/or disposal of the equipment. Achieved
100%
By March 31, 2017, 95% of copy paper, commercial printing, and/or envelope purchases will contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and be certified to a recognized environmental standard to reduce the environmental impact of their production. Achieved
100%
By March 31, 2017, 90% of toner cartridges will be recycled at end of life. Achieved
100%
Measurement of Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Level Attained
Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Achieved
Train acquisition cardholders on green procurement. Achieved
Target 7.3: Sustainable Workplace Operations
As of April 1, 2015, the Government of Canada will update and adopt policies and practices to improve the sustainability of its workplace operations.
Performance Measurement
Planned Outcome
Departmental workplace operations have a reduced environmental impact.
Performance Indicator Performance Level Attained
An approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of the departmental workplace in place by March 31, 2015. Implementation date: March 31, 2015
Measurement of Implementation Strategy Element or Best Practice Performance Level Attained
Engage employees in greening government operations practices. Achieved
Maintain or improve existing approaches to sustainable workplace practices (i.e., printer ratios, paper usage and green meetings). Achieved
Select and operate IT and office equipment in a manner that reduces energy consumption and material usage. Achieved
Dispose of e-waste in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Achieved
Reuse or recycle workplace materiel and assets in an environmentally sound and secure manner. Achieved
Increase the population density in office buildings and space utilization in special purpose buildings. Achieved

5. Additional Department/Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

In addition to the enterprises supported under the Business Development sub-program, CED backed projects contributing to its DSDS under other sub-programs.

Thus, taking into account all projects for which expenditures were made in 2014–15, 79 projects ($17.5M in total expenditures) contributed to CED’s DSDS. Projects associated with CED’s DSDS thus accounted for some 8% of G&C expenditures in 2014–15.

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Responsibility for managing sustainable development is shared among different CED committees and sectors.

Executive Committee
The Executive Committee is chaired by CED’s Deputy Minister/President, and is responsible for collectively managing all CED activities and advising the Deputy Minister/President on policy and management issues.

Program Management Committee
The Program Management Committee is chaired by the Director General, Policy, Research and Programs (Policy and Communications Sector). Its mandate includes optimizing program performance and guiding CED in intervention analysis, performance measurement, and program evaluation. This committee also validates presentations made to it periodically in the course of the preparation of RPPs and DPRs, in which the DSDS is integrated in the form of a supplementary table.

Sustainable Development Committee
The Sustainable Development Committee comprises members from CED’s different branches involved in sustainable development-related activities. The committee takes part in drawing up and updating CED’s DSDS; its members promote the strategy in their respective settings and contribute to its implementation.

Three sectors also share responsibility for sustainable development, as described below.

Policy and Communications Sector
Within the Policy and Communications Sector, the Policy, Research and Programs Branch (PRPB) and the Communications Directorate have sustainable development responsibilities.

The PRPB:

The Communications Directorate:

Operations Sector
The Operations Sector is responsible for implementing CED’s programs. It includes a network of business offices across Quebec, and contributes to implementation of the DSDS.

More specifically, this sector:

Corporate Services Sector

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2014–15 report submission cycle, CED took into account the environmental impact of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals in its decision-making process.

In 2012, CED conducted a strategic environmental assessment of the Quebec Economic Development ProgramEndnote1 and updated it in accordance with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 (CEAA 2012)Endnote2 and the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.Endnote3 This assessment concluded that the program’s implementation was not likely to generate significant environmental effects, provided CEAA 2012 is applied to supported projects so as to ensure that no significant environmental effects are generated.

No strategic environmental assessments were conducted in 2014–15.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs

Name of transfer payment program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

Start date: April 1, 2012

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada’s Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008

Description: The QEDP contributes to promoting the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by paying special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.

Results achieved: Through the QEDP, CED invested more than $212.2 million in 2014–15 in 1,083 projects in order to foster business growth and build strong, competitive regions, and to implement national programs as well as initiatives in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth.

 

Through the Business Development PAA program, CED contributed to the startup of 43% of the enterprises supported. The majority (65%) of enterprises assisted with a view to enhancing their performance through increased productivity or promoting their expansion, innovation, commercialization, exports or partnerships maintained or increased their sales, thereby exceeding the targets.

Under its Regional Economic Development PAA program, CED contributes to building strong, competitive regions: 29% of communities were supported in 2014–15 in their engagement efforts in order to increase their resilience in the face of volatile economic conditions. CED also aims to stimulate investment in the regions: 100% of communities supported implemented community economic facility projects, 6.5 million tourists from outside Quebec were attracted to the regions, and 50 international agencies or foreign firms were maintained in or attracted to the regions supported. These results are conclusive, and surpass expectations.

In 2014–15, CED was called upon to develop, administer and implement national programs or targeted and/or temporary initiatives under its Strengthening Community Economies program.Endnote4 CED invested a total of $48.5 million in 237 projects aimed at the recovery or diversification of the economies of Quebec communities struggling with targeted economic development issues. CED’s intervention to strengthen community economies generated $776.6 million in total investment in Quebec communities.Endnote5

Program (dollars)
  2012-13
Actual Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities
2014-15
Actual Spending
Variance
Grants 50,000 16,504 1,650,000 1,650,000 140,638 1,509,362
Contributions 203,654,608 197,447,309 174,691,428 181,550,033 183,582,593 8,891,165
Other Types of Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Program 203,704,608 197,463,813 176,341,428 183,200,033 183,723,231 7,381,803

Comments on variances: The $7.4-million difference between planned and actual spending in 2014–15 is primarily attributable to the acquisition of funds that were not yet known when planned spending was established:

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned: An evaluation of the QEDP is planned in 2016-17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Name of transfer payment program: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Start date: May 18, 1995

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada's Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Description: This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, including Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs).

Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.

Results achieved: CED provided financial support to 56 CFDCs located in designated rural regions and 10 Business Development Centres (BDCs) in disadvantaged peri-urban areas. In 2014–15, some $28.4 million was paid to those agencies to help them support the implementation of 1,463 projects to strengthen the economies of Quebec’s rural communities.

CED also exceeded its results targets as of March 31, 2015. Indeed, 553 economic development initiatives were implemented in communities in 2014–15 following support from CFDCs. With the assistance of CFDCs and BDCs, 69% of the entrepreneurs supported carried out the pre-startup, startup or acquisition of a business (target: 60%), while 89% of enterprises carried out their recovery, expansion or modernization projects (target: 73%).

Program (dollars)
  2012-13
Actual Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2014-15
Total Authorities
2014-15
Actual Spending
Variance
Grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Contributions 28,613,133 28,471,467 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,444,820 523,198
Other Types of Transfer Payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Program 28,613,133 28,471,467 28,968,018 28,968,018 28,444,820 523,198

Comments on variances: Non-significant variance

Audits completed or planned: N/A

Evaluations completed or planned:

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Table (2014-15)

Name of Internal Audit

Type of Internal Audit

Status

Completion Date

 

Transfer payment

Achieved

January 2015

 

Table of Evaluations Under Way or Completed (2014–15)

Name of Evaluation

Link to Program Alignment Architecture

Status

Completion Date

 

1.2 Regional Economic Development

Achieved

December 2014

 

1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

Achieved

March 2015

 

Evaluation of the Community Futures Program (CFP)

1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

In progress

2015–16

 

Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE)

1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

In progress

2015–16

 

Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program (PDEQ)

1.1 Business Development;
1.2 Regional Economic Development;
1.3 Strengthening Community Economies

In progress

2016–17

 

All CED evaluation reports are available on the CED website.

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

Response to the Auditor General of Canada, including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

User Fees Reporting

User fees: Fees may be charged under the Access to Information Act. Where applicable, other fees may also be charged for reproduction, research, preparation, production, programming and alternate format.

Fee type: Other products and services

Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act and Regulations

Date last modified: 1983

Performance standards: The person responsible in the organization is required to convey in whole or in part the documents requested, within 30 days following receipt of the access to information request. Pursuant to section 9 of the Act, the response time may be extended; notice of extension must then be sent to the person requesting the information. Further information on the Access to Information Act can be found on the Department of Justice site. Information on the regulations under the Act may also be consulted on the legislation site.

Performance results: In all, 67% of requests were answered within 30 days of their receipt. Considering the number of requests extended in 2014–15, 100% of requests were answered within the timeframe set out in the Access to Information Act.

2014-15
(dollars)
Planning Years
(dollars)
Planned Revenue Actual Revenue Full Cost Fiscal Year Planned Revenue Estimated Full Cost
100 75 97,857 2015-16 100 117 000
2016-17 100 119 000
2017-18 100 121 000

Other information: CED complies with Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines regarding the imposition of and exemption from access fees. For instance, it waives fees for amounts under $25. For higher sums it determines, based on the perceived public interest, whether it is appropriate to charge the full cost or not. In 2014–15, CED waived $45 in fees under the directive on the administration of the Access to Information Act.

Appendix 1 – Methodology and Technical Notes on Performance Data and Performance Status Rating

1. Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED) Performance Measurement Methodology

1.1 Tracking of projects

The tracking of CED-supported projects is carried out through a performance data collection system that has been in place since April 1, 2007. On April 1, 2012, a new Performance Management Framework (PMF) was implemented, reflecting CED’s new Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its new regular program, the Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP). Since that date, project tracking has exhibited major improvements, in particular the reduction in the number of indicators, as well as efforts to simplify and automate the management information system (Hermès).

In the field of economic development, expected results are rarely observed during the year of the expenditure. Generally speaking, it is only after one or two years that the impact of an enterprise’s development activities on its sales is seen. The same is true for many activities supported through CED programs, whether in market development, technology transfer or enterprise creation.

To report on the use of funding awarded by CED in 2014–15, and intermediate and final results, two main baselines are used in this report:

Moreover, CED’s intervention takes place in two ways:

1.2 Performance data collection

1.2.1 Reliability of performance data

For DA projects, project results are tracked by business office advisors, as part of regular customer agreement follow-up activities. Generally speaking, the data come from enterprises’ financial statements, thus yielding a high level of reliability. Instructions for using and inputting indicators along with appropriate quality controls ensure standardized input of data into the Hermès financial information system. In that regard, simplification and automation have reduced the time advisors devote to tracking the performance of each project.

In the context of IG projects, CED has introduced a new data collection strategy in order to measure the impact of IGs’ intervention in relation to their recipients. This approach, which involves tracking IGs’ clientele directly, is based on obtaining a list of accompanied recipients so that CED can send them a survey. To date, the results obtained have been conclusive and yield more reliable information on the services offered to recipients. This procedure helps avoid a situation where an enterprise is counted twice, through different intermediary groups. Note that this approach will be broadened to all IGs supported by CED in the years to come.

The Technical Notes section of Appendix 1 provides detailed information on the reliability of the data presented in this Report. Indeed, the findings of the most recent internal audit on the integrity of the information from the Hermès system confirm that the information contained in the Hermès Programmes application, CED’s tracking system, is reliable for decision-making and information purposes.

1.2.2 Attribution of results

CED works closely with several departments and agencies of the Government of Canada and the Quebec government, and with many local and regional stakeholders. This collaboration is reflected in the financial packages put together for projects. That is why CED cannot itself take credit or claim responsibility for all the results obtained. It is therefore fair to say that the financial assistance awarded by CED for the completion of projects contributes to attainment of the results observed.

2. Technical Notes on Performance Data

List of Acronyms:

BCF:

Building Canada Fund–Quebec

 

BDC:

Business Development Centre

 

CFDC:

Community Futures Development Corporation

 

CFO:

Community Futures Organization

 

CFP:

Community Futures Program

 

DA:

Direct intervention with enterprises

 

DPR:

Departmental Performance Report

 

EDI:

Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative

 

ET:

Equivalent territory

 

ICD:

International cruise development

 

IG:

Intervention through intermediary groups

 

LII:

Local Investment Initiative

 

MRIF:

Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund

 

NPO:

Non-profit organization

 

ORPEX:

Regional export promotion organization

 

PAA:

Program Alignment Architecture

 

QEDP:

Quebec Economic Development Program

 

RCM:

Regional county municipality

 

RIWC:

Restoration Initiative for Watercourse Crossings

 

RPP:

Report on Plans and Priorities

 

SICSBOQ:

Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec

 

SME:

Small and medium-sized enterprise

 

Chrysotile:

Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile

 

Infrastructure:

Infrastructure Canada Program

 

Mégantic:

Funding for the economic recovery of the town of Lac-Mégantic

 

2.1 Technical notes on Performance Measurement Framework (PMF) indicators

STRATEGIC OUTCOME – Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Indicator:

Number of Quebec administrative regions that increased their gross domestic product

 

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017.

 

Result attained:

N/A

 

Data source:

Institut de la statistique du Québec

 

Methodology:

Number of Quebec administrative regions having increased their gross domestic product between 2012 and 2017.

 

Note:

There are a total of 17 administrative regions in Quebec.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Indicator:

Percentage of Quebec communities having improved their economic performance

 

Collection frequency:

Five years; target implementation date is March 31, 2017.

 

Result attained:

N/A

 

Data source:

Statistics Canada, Institut de la statistique du Québec, Conference Board of Canada and United States Patent and Trademark Office

 

Methodology:

Number of Quebec RCMs and ETs having improved their economic performance with regard to the main economic variables in CED’s Economic Development Index (participation rate, value of building permits, level of entrepreneurship, productivity, level of exporting establishments, number of patents, and diversification) out of the total number of RCMs/ETs, expressed as a percentage, between 2012 and 2017.

 

Note:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ETs in Quebec.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

PROGRAM 1.1 – BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

FINAL RESULT – The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed.

Indicator:

Rate of survival of businesses supported in their startup

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

84% (88/105 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

The DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and startup projects whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2009–10 and 2011–12 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., between 2012–13 and 2014–15, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business creation and startup projects whose projects were completed between 2009–10 and 2011–12, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Rate of survival of businesses supported in their transfer

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

No result

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and CED’s Recovery Services

 

Methodology:

The DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Number of enterprises supported for Business succession and transfer projects whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2009–10 and 2011–12 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., between 2012–13 and 2014–15, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business succession and transfer projects whose projects were completed between 2009–10 and 2011–12, expressed as a percentage.

 

Notes:

This indicator was removed from CED’s PMF within the framework of the management, resources, and results structures modification process for FY 2015–16. A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Indicator:

Rate of survival of businesses supported in their development

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

96% (696/725 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and CED’s Recovery Services

 

Methodology:

The DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Number of enterprises supported for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects whose projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2009–10 and 2011–12 for which there is no winding-up date three years later, i.e., between 2012–13 and 2014–15, out of the total number of enterprises receiving financial assistance for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects whose projects were completed between 2009–10 and 2011–12, expressed as a percentage.

 

Note:

A winding-up date is assigned to an enterprise when CED’s files indicate that the enterprise is in contractual default owing to: (1) cessation of the enterprise’s activities, (2) bankruptcy, (3) liquidation or (4) dissolution and receivership or that it is written off with the status of (5) corporation is inoperative and without assets, (6) corporate bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (7) corporate bankruptcy, no residual dividend, (8) individual bankruptcy, trustee discharged, (9) individual bankruptcy, no residual dividend, or (10) debtor deceased, no known estate.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.1 – Entrepreneurship Support

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Enterprises are started up or transferred

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises started up

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

43% (30/70 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business creation and startup projects which attained or maintained the status of startup enterprise in calendar 2014 out of enterprises whose Business creation and startup projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2011–12 and 2014–15, expressed as a percentage. An enterprise is deemed to have started up when it meets the following two conditions: it has been in operation for at least one year, and it generates revenues equivalent to at least 80% of its expenditures

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 21% of data missing (19/89) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2014 financial statements as of early June 2015.

 

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises transferred

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

No result

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises supported for Business succession and transfer projects which attained or maintained the status of startup enterprise in calendar 2014 out of enterprises whose Business succession and transfer projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between 2011–12 and 2014–15, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

N/A

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to support entrepreneurship

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

114

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Entrepreneurship Support (Business creation and startup and Business succession and transfer) projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total value of grants and contributions (G&C) awarded in order to support entrepreneurship

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$13,159,021

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Entrepreneurship Support (Business creation and startup and Business succession and transfer) projects in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.1.2 – Business Performance

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Enterprises improve their performance.

Indicator:

Percentage of coached businesses that maintained or increased their sales figures or self-generated income

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

65% (65/100 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2014, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer and Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2011–12 and 2013–14, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by this pool, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 34% of data missing (52/152) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2014 financial statements as of early June 2015.

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to enhance existing enterprises’ performance

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

629

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects with expenditures in 2014–15.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to enhance existing enterprises’ performance

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$118,567,415

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) projects in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

PROGRAM 1.2 – REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

FINAL RESULT – Quebec’s regions have a stronger economic base.

Indicator:

Total amount of investment generated in regions supported that completed the implementation of their development project

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$64,269,713

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

The DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Sum of total costs of Development strategies and Community economic facilities projects that were completed (actual project end date) between 2012–13 and 2014–15.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Amount of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$10.2 billion

 

Data source:

Tourisme Québec

 

Methodology:

Most recent annual amount released by Tourisme Québec of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e., the sum of spending by tourists from other provinces, the United States and other countries.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Amount of foreign direct investment maintained in or attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$3.7 billion

 

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the agencies supported

 

Methodology:

The DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. Total annual foreign direct investment maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by agencies having received financial assistance in 2014–15 for Promotion of regional assets projects (i.e., with expenditures in 2014–15).

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.1 – Regional Engagement

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities take charge of their economic development.

Indicator:

Percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization projects

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

29% (4/14)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Development strategies projects in 2014–15 out of the total number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2014–15 for Development strategies projects (sum of planning and implementation projects), expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to engage the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

24

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Regional Engagement (Development strategies) projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to engage the regions

 

Result attained:

$3,139,481

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of Regional Engagement (Development strategies) project expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.2.2 – Regional Investment

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Quebec regions attract investment.

Indicator:

Percentage of communities supported which implement community economic facility projects

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

100%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of individual communities implementing Community economic facilities projects in 2014–15 out of the total number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2014–15 for Community economic facilities projects (total of planning and implementation projects), expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

6.5 million

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Most recent annual data released by Tourisme Québec concerning the number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to Quebec, i.e., the sum of tourists from other provinces, the United States and other countries. These data are limited to the number of tourists, and do not include daytrippers.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Indicator:

Number of international organizations and foreign enterprises maintained, in expansion or attracted to the regions supported

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

50

 

Data source:

Annual or in-house reports of the agencies supported

 

Methodology:

Total number of international agencies and foreign firms maintained or attracted, as most recently reported by agencies having received financial assistance (i.e., with expenditures) in 2014–15 for Promotion of regional assets projects.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded in order to attract investment to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

79

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of Regional Investment (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded in order to attract investment to the regions

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$28,877,388

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for Regional Investment (Community economic facilities and Promotion of regional assets) projects in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

PROGRAM 1.3 – STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY ECONOMIES

FINAL RESULT – Quebec communities have stronger economies.

Indicator:

Value of total investment generated in communities (by program and initiative)

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

Initiative and program total: $776.6M
CFP: $730.4M
Infrastructure: N/A
EDI: $6.9M
Chrysotile: $15.1M
Mégantic: $18.83M
LII: $5.38M

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

For the CFP, the DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15, and corresponds to the sum of total costs of projects of enterprises receiving assistance from CFDCs and BDCs that were completed. For Infrastructure, the result is reported in Infrastructure Canada’s RPP. For EDI and Chrysotile, the DPR 2014–15 result is cumulative, covers the period from 2013–14 to 2014–15, and corresponds to the sum of total costs of projects multiplied by the ratio of total cost of projects to authorized assistance from CED.

 

Notes:

The CFP indicator was withdrawn from CED’s PMF and replaced by “the percentage point increase in the survival rate of CFP clients having received assistance compared with the rate for comparable enterprises not having received assistance” within the framework of the management, resources, and results structures modification process for FY 2015–16. For reference, for the Mégantic and LII initiatives, the indicator was calculated using the same methodology as for EDI and Chrysotile, despite the fact that those initiatives have no identified target in the RPP 2014–15.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.1 – Community Futures Program (CFP)

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities are economically sustainable.

Indicator:

Number of economic development initiatives implemented in communities following support to CFDCs

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

553

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of economic development projects supported by CFDCs, under the CFP, in 2014–15. These data do not include BDCs.

 

Reliability of result:

High, on the basis of information provided by CFDCs.

 

Indicator:

Percentage of entrepreneurs undertaking pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an enterprise with support from CFDC’s and BDC’s.

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

69%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of number of enterprises having drawn up a business plan, number of enterprises created and number of enterprises acquired out of the number of enterprises having received personalized coaching services with respect to pre-startup, startup or acquisition of enterprises from CFDCs in 2014–15, expressed as a percentage.

 

Notes:

This indicator was withdrawn from CED’s PMF and replaced by “the percentage point increase in the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance compared with the rate for comparable enterprises not having received assistance” within the framework of the management, resources, and results structures modification process for FY 2015–16.

 

Reliability of result:

High

 

Indicator:

Percentage of enterprises carrying out recovery, expansion or modernization projects with support from CFDC’s and BDC’s.

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

89%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises recovered, modernized or expanding out of the number of enterprises undergoing recovery, expansion or modernization having received coaching services from CFDCs in 2014–15, expressed as a percentage.

 

Notes:

This indicator was withdrawn from CED’s PMF and replaced by “the percentage point increase in the sales growth rate of CFP clients having received assistance compared with the rate for comparable enterprises not having received assistance” within the framework of the management, resources, and results structures modification process for FY 2015–16.

 

Reliability of result:

High

 

Output:

Number of projects funded by CFOs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

1,463

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and promoters’ reports

 

Methodology:

Sum of number of enterprises having received personalized coaching services with respect to pre-startup, startup or acquisition of enterprises and number of enterprises undergoing recovery, expansion or modernization having received coaching services from CFDCs and BDCs in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

High. Use of a new data source (i.e., list provided by CFDCs of enterprises receiving assistance) yields data of greater liability and considerably reduces the possibility of duplication.

 

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded to CFDCs and BDCs in order for communities to be economically sustainable

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

$28,444,820

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of expenditures for CFDC and BDC projects in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.2 – Infrastructure Modernization

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure.

Indicator:

Number of communities that have at their disposal completed public infrastructure under the terms of the contribution agreement

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

N/A

 

Data source:

Internal Audit of Shared Information Management System for Infrastructure, developed by Infrastructure Canada

 

Methodology:

Results are reported in Infrastructure Canada’s RPP.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

SUB-PROGRAM 1.3.3 – Targeted and/or Temporary Support

INTERMEDIATE RESULT – Communities have targeted and/or temporary support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies.

Indicator:

Percentage of communities that benefit from temporary support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

EDI: 23%
Chrysotile: 100%
Mégantic: 100%

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of individual communities having received financial assistance in 2014–15 out of the number of communities targeted by the initiative, expressed as a percentage. Results are calculated on the basis of clients’ physical locations (service points).

 

Note:

This indicator was withdrawn from CED’s PMF and replaced by “the number of communities supported receiving targeted and/or temporary support” within the framework of the management, resources, and results structures modification process for FY 2015–16.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Number of projects funded for communities to have temporary support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

EDI: 12
Chrysotile: 18
Mégantic: 13
LII : 120
ICD: 1
RIWC: 1
SICSBOQ: 1

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects by initiative with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Output:

Total value of G&C awarded for communities to have temporary support, by initiative

 

Collection frequency:

Yearly

 

Result attained:

EDI: $1,720,489
Chrysotile: $3,900,000
Mégantic: $8,799,860
LII: $2,227,158
ICD: $375,419
RIWC: $1,457,000
SICSBOQ: $1,500,000

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of project expenditures per initiative in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

2.2 Technical notes on other performance data

2.2.1 Additional data with respect to strategic outcome

Data:

Total number of projects supported in 2014–15 (excluding Infrastructure Modernization sub-program (SP))

 

Value:

1,083

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total number of projects approved in 2014–15 (excluding Infrastructure Modernization SP)

 

Value:

731

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of projects approved in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total actual expenditures in in 2014–15 (excluding Infrastructure Modernization SP)

 

Value:

$212,168,051

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Total leverage effect in 2014–15 (excluding Infrastructure Modernization SP)

 

Value:

2.88

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Leverage effect corresponds to the difference between Total cost of projects with expenditures in 2014–15 and Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2014–15 divided by Total assistance authorized for projects with expenditures in 2014–15.

 

Note:

Since project durations and start dates vary, the leverage effect accounts for sums spread over several years, before, during or after 2014–15.

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Value of multi-year financial assistance approved by CED in 2014–15

 

Value:

$319,529,661

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total amount of Authorized assistance for projects approved in 2014–15; no processing

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Value of total investment generated in 2014–15

 

Value:

$1,731,843,305

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total costs of projects approved in 2014–15; no processing

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

9,843 (621 in DA and 9,222 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises (including asset-operating NPOs under Business Performance) having received financial support from CED on the basis of DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of individual communities having received financial support from CED (direct/indirect, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

104 (102 in DA and 103 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities having received financial support from CED on the basis of DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Note:

There are a total of 104 RCMs/ETs in Quebec (one RCM/ET = one community).

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 
2.2.2 Additional data with respect to Business Performance sub-program

Data:

Number of enterprises having received financial support under the Business Performance sub-program (direct/indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

7,615 (585 in DA and 7,030 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Business Performance (Productivity and expansion, Innovation and technology transfer, Commercialization and exports, and Structuring of networks) DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in their Productivity and expansion project (direct/indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

1,891 (364 in DA and 1,527 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Productivity and expansion DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Innovation and technology transfer (direct/indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

1,645 (71 in DA and 1,574 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Innovation and technology transfer DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Commercialization and exports (direct/indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

3,482 (143 in DA and 3,339 in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Commercialization and exports DA and IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of enterprises having received support in Structuring of networks (indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

590 (All in IG)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system and IG activity reports

 

Methodology:

Total number of enterprises having received financial support from CED on the basis of Structuring of networks IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

DA: Very high
IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Number of newly exporting enterprises (indirect assistance, in 2014–15)

 

Value:

1,816 (All in IG)

 

Data source:

IG activity reports and survey of IG clients

 

Methodology:

Number of newly exporting enterprises in 2014–15 on the basis of Commercialization and export IG projects with expenditures in 2014–15

 

Reliability of result:

IG: High, on the basis of activity reports provided by IGs

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Productivity and expansion having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

67% (45/67 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2014, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Productivity and expansion projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2011–12 and 2013–14, out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by this pool, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 36% of data missing (37/104) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2014 financial statements as of early June 2015.

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Innovation and technology transfer having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

64% (9/14 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2014, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Innovation and technology transfer projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2011–12 and 2013–14 out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 26% of data missing (5/19) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2014 financial statements as of early June 2015.

 

Data:

Percentage of enterprises supported with respect to Commercialization and exports having maintained or increased their sales

 

Value:

58% (11/19 X 100; DA only)

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs having maintained or increased their sales or self-generated revenue, respectively, in calendar 2014, one year but not more than two years after the actual end date of their project, compared with the results in the last financial statements prior to the start of the project, for enterprises and asset-operating NPOs whose Commercialization and exports projects were completed (i.e., actual project end date) between FYs 2011–12 and 2013–14 out of the total number of enterprises and asset-operating NPOs represented by that pool, expressed as a percentage.

 

Reliability of result:

DA: High; 34% of data missing (10/29) since many enterprises had not yet released their 2014 financial statements as of early June 2015.

 
2.2.3 Additional data with respect to Regional Engagement sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.1.2 Regional Engagement

 

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the Regional Engagement SP in 2014–15

 

Result attained:

14

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2014–15 for Development strategies projects (total of planning and implementation projects)

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 
2.2.4 Additional data with respect to Community economic facilities sub-sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.2.2 Regional Investment

 

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the Community economic facilities sub-sub-program in 2014–15

 

Result attained:

4

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2014–15 for Community economic facilities projects (total of planning and implementation projects)

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 
2.2.5 Additional data with respect to Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) sub-sub-program

Type of result:

SP 1.3.3 Targeted and/or Temporary Support

 

Indicator:

Number of individual communities supported under the EDI sub-sub-program in 2014–15

 

Result attained:

14

 

Data source:

Hermès management information system

 

Methodology:

Total number of individual communities receiving financial assistance in 2014–15 for EDI projects

 

Reliability of result:

Very high

 

Endnotes

Endnote 1

Refer to CED’s website.

Return to endnote 1 referrer

Endnote 2

Refer to the Justice Canada website.

Return to endnote 2 referrer

Endnote 3

Refer to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency website.

Return to endnote 3 referrer

Endnote 4

The Strengthening Community Economies PAA program excludes the following transfer payment programs: the Community Futures Program (CFP), and the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 4 referrer

Endnote 5

The above result is cumulative, and covers the period from 2012–13 to 2014–15. It excludes projects associated with the Infrastructure Modernization sub-program.

Return to endnote 5 referrer

Endnote 6

Reports to Parliament

Return to endnote 6 referrer

Endnote 7

Audit reports 2013-2014

Return to endnote 7 referrer

Endnote 8

Audits

Return to endnote 8 referrer

 

Date modified: