Performance Report as of March 31, 2012

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Publish date : November 8, 2012

Summary :

This report presents Canada Economic Development's principal achiements in regards to its engagements towards the Parliament.

Table of Contents

  1. Message from the Minister
  2. 1. Agency overview
  3. 2. Analysis of program activities by strategic outcome
  4. 3. Supplementary information
  5. 4. Other items of interest
  6. Appendix - Technical notes on performance data
  7. Table: Greening Government Operations
  8. Table: User Fees Reporting
  9. Table: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TTPs)
  10. Table: Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits
  11. Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue
  12. Table: Internal Audits and Evaluations

Message from the Minister

Photo of Denis Lebel I am proud to submit to Parliament the Departmental Performance Report of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec for the period ending March 31, 2012.

Over the past few years, the global economic context has posed major challenges for the country’s communities and enterprises. The Government of Canada has acted speedily to mitigate the impact of this crisis and contribute to the recovery of the Canadian economy. The Departmental Performance Report presents the tangible results of the programs and initiatives put in place by the Agency.

Thus, in the past year, the Agency invested $253 million in grants and contributions to help small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) in Quebec become more competitive and energize communities. The Agency’s programs have generated an economic leverage effect, whereby each $1 invested by the Agency has generated an average of $2.33 invested by promoters and other funding sources.

To stimulate the economy and employment, the Agency has also continued implementation of temporary initiatives, in particular the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program, a component of Canada’s Economic Action Plan, and the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies, aimed respectively at increasing recreational infrastructure construction activity and supporting projects targeting the diversification of forest communities.

At the same time, the Agency initiated over the past year the rollout of its transformation and modernization, in order to become more efficient and provide enhanced service to the public. In that regard, to meet the challenges of Quebec regions and enterprises, the Agency updated its regional economic development vision, and this is reflected in the new Quebec Economic Development Program, in effect since April 2012.

I invite you to read through this report, which shows that the Agency’s intervention is closely geared to the economic realities of Quebec and its regions and contributes to enterprise development and community vitality.

Denis Lebel
Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

1. Agency overview

1.1 Raison d’être

The object of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec is to promote long-term economic development by giving special attention to regions where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

Through its economic role, the Agency is central to government priorities with respect to the economy and employment. It is present in all Quebec regions, and works in conjunction with local organizations. The Agency supports communities and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) so they can take part in the economy of tomorrow and achieve their full potential by building on their strengths, while at the same time improving their performance, productivity and innovation capability. Furthermore, the Agency provides its support to regions facing major crises by helping them diversify their economic activity base so as to enhance their long-term viability.Note 1

1.2 Responsibilities

Through its business offices,Note 2 the Agency’s presence is well-rooted in all Quebec regions. It acts in relation to enterprises—predominantly SMEs—and non-profit organization (NPOs), which the Agency supports in their development projects primarily by providing financial assistance for project implementation.

The Agency’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development. It is:

Agency Programs and Initiatives in 2011-12

Regular Programs:

  • Community Diversification
  • Business and Regional Growth
  • Regional Development Research

Canada-wide Programs Implemented in Quebec by the Agency:

  • Community Futures Program
  • North American Platform Program

Infrastructure Programs:

  • Building Canada Fund-Quebec
  • Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund
  • Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund

Ad-hoc Initiatives:

  • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative
  • Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies
  • Support Initiative for International Cruise Development on the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers
  • Contribution Program to Fund Construction of a Gas Pipeline Between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines

Canada’s Economic Action Plan Initiative:

  • Recreational Infrastructure Canada Program

1.3 Strategic Outcome and Program Activity Architecture (PAA)

In 2011-12, to fulfil its mandate, the Agency aimed to attain the strategic outcome:
A Competitive and Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec. The following table presents the Agency’s PAA in effect during this period, and shows the full framework of program activities and subactivities, as well as their contribution to the strategic outcome.

Program Activity Architecture
Strategic Outcome Program Activities Program Subactivities Internal Services
A Competitive and Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec Community Development
  • Community Mobilization
  • Local and Regional Enterprises
  • Tourism and Community Facilities
Governance and Management

Support Resource Management services

Asset Management Services
Infrastructure
  • Water Quality
  • Roads and Public Transit
  • Urban or Regional Projects
  • Special Infrastructure-dedicated ProgramsNote 3
Special Intervention Measures
  • Community Adjustment to Economic Shocks
  • Community Adjustment to Natural Disasters
SOLELY AS REQUIRED, AD-HOC FUNDING
Enterprise Competitiveness
  • Enterprises’ Strategic Capability
  • Strategic Enterprises
Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions
  • Growth Poles
  • International Promotion of Regions
Policies, Programs and Initiatives
  • Analysis and Research
  • Policies and Programs
  • Representation, Influence and Collaboration

In line with Government of Canada priorities, the Agency initiated the rollout of its transformation and modernization so as to be more efficient and offer enhanced service to the public, by adopting practices that make greater use of technology. Thus, the Agency revised its strategic outcome and simplified its Program Activity Architecture and its performance measurement, as well as its programs. The changes took effect on April 1, 2012. Details are presented in the Agency’s 2012-13 Report on Plans and Priorities.Note 4

1.4 Organizational Priorities

Priorities represent the areas on which the Agency has decided to focus. They are established on the basis of Government of Canada priorities, departmental targeted results and the regions’ economic challenges. During 2011-12, the Agency implemented the following four priorities:

Priority: Make Quebec Communities Stronger

Type: Priority previously committed to during FY 2010-11 (Revised wording)

Links to Program Activities: Community Development

Progress Against Priority

Priority: Help SMEs Become More Competitive

Type: Priority previously committed to during FY 2010-11 (Revised wording)

Links to Program Activities: Enterprise Competitiveness

Progress Against Priority

Priority: Improve the Integrated Planning Approach

Type: New priority

Links to Program Activities: Internal Services

Progress Against Priority

Priority: Update Directions and Renew Programs

Type: Priority previously committed to during FY 2010-11 (Revised wording)

Links to Program Activities: Policies, Programs and Initiatives Internal Services

Progress Against Priority

1.5 Risk Analysis

In its desire to attain its results, the Agency has to have an overview of the changing factors that have a marked impact on its environment and to integrate these factors into its decision-making processes so as to respond more effectively to the new needs of Quebec SMEs, communities and regions.

Over the past year, the Agency conducted follow-up on its key risk profile. This presented the risks most likely to affect attainment of the Agency’s expected results and its performance in terms of the effectiveness and efficiency of management practices. The Agency implemented and conducted follow-up on the mitigation strategies established in its risk profile.

Key Corporate RisksNote 8
Governance

Additional pressure on Agency budget following decline in program expenditures from other funding providers

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Monitoring and analysis of other funding providers’ priorities
  • Review of their programs and budgets, and analysis of impact on Agency
Key Corporate Risks
Policies and Programs

Development (including associated tools) of new grants and contributions programs

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Governance structure and project management, led by a dedicated team, fostering consultation and involvement of the Agency’s different sectors
  • Taking into account of observations made in particular in the 2010 Strategic Review, program evaluations, evaluations associated with the Management Accountability Framework and studies
  • Development and implementation of an internal and external communication strategy and an internal training strategy
Key Corporate Risks
Human Resources

Human resources management, especially future match between operational needs and existing human resources

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Introduction of an integrated human resources management committee which monitors all measures associated with human resources management
  • Implementation of an Integrated Human Resources Plan and integration with departmental planning so as to ensure a match between operational needs and existing human resources
Key Corporate Risks
Information Management

Management of information (e.g., system, accuracy of information) to support decision-making and reporting

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Implementation of a strategy to clarify procedures for disposition of grants and contributions files
  • Execution of work for implementation of an electronic document management system
  • Implementation of a new information classification model
Key Corporate Risks
Control

Control system linked to program delivery and management of corporate finances

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Conducting of an evaluation of the effectiveness of internal controls and departmental systems for financial reporting which shows that controls are in place and are adequately designed and documented
Key Corporate Risks
Receivables

Risk of growing number of bad debts

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Establishment of a file handling process, including mechanisms for evaluation, follow-up and classification of files
  • Adequate recruitment of collection resources
Key Corporate Risks
Citizen-focussed Services

Deployment of new service delivery strategy

Mitigation Strategies Implemented in 2011-12
  • Implementation of the Service Delivery Strategy, which will include a feedback management process
  • Establishment of a service delivery quality circle whereby internal consultations can be carried out and inter-sectoral support obtained
  • Periodic presentation of progress reports to the customer service management committee

1.6 Summary of Performance

This section provides an overview of planned and actual financial resources (grants and contributions, and operations) and human resources expressed as full-time equivalents (FTEs), along with a summary table portraying the Agency’s performance in 2011-12.

2011-12 Financial Resources (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*
298,903 323,484 305,921
*Excludes amount allocated to Shared Services Canada.

Variance Between Planned Spending and Total Authorities

The variance between planned spending and total authorities is primarily attributable to the deferral of funding for the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) program and the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies from 2010-11 to 2011-12.

Variance Between Total Authorities and Actual Spending

Most of the authorities obtained for 2011-12 were spent. The variance between total authorities and actual spending is largely attributable to Support Initiative for International Cruise Development on the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers and RInC projects which were not implemented on the scale or at the pace anticipated.

Furthermore, amounts totalling some $4 million were deferred to 2012-13, including for the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative.

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
399 406 7

The variance of seven FTEs primarily represents additional resources hired to deliver the programs and initiatives listed above for which new funding was awarded, and to meet the Agency’s various operational needs.

Progress Toward Strategic Outcome: A Competitive and Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

Performance Indicators
  • Impact of dollars spent by the Agency on GDP and employment
  • Survival rate and sales of SMEs supported by the Agency
Five-year Target (2007-08 to 2011-12)
  • The competitiveness and economic diversification of the regions of Quebec are maintained or increased.
2011-12 PerformanceNote 9

Leverage Effect:Note 10

  • The amount of multiyear financial assistance approved by the Agency for supporting Quebec communities and SMEs stood at $775.6 million and generated $1.81 billion in investment by promoters and other funding sources.
  • $1 from the Agency = $2.33 in investment by the promoter and other funding sources

Incentive Aspect of Assistance:

  • The evaluations of the Community DiversificationNote 11 and Business and Regional GrowthNote 12 programs indicate that without the assistance received from the Agency, it would have been impossible to carry out 82.9% of the projects.

Survival Rate:Note 13

  • Enterprises receiving Agency assistance posted a higher survival rate than comparable enterprises. Thus, 72.6% of enterprises assisted in 2002 were still in operation seven years later (2009), compared with 68.5% for enterprises in the control group.

Sales:

  • During the period 2002-09, enterprises which received financial support from the Agency posted stronger sales growth performance than a control group consisting of comparable enterprises which did not receive Agency support.
  • Thus, the sales of Agency-supported enterprises rose by 72% between 2002 and 2009, whereas those receiving no Agency support saw their sales increase by an average of 47%.
Performance Summary, Excluding Internal Services (in thousands of dollars)Note 14
  2011-12Note 15 Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
Program Activity 2010-11 Actual Spending Main Estimates Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 16 Actual Spending
Community Development 136,939 152,931 152,931 140,936 130,267 Strong economic growth
Infrastructure 79,161 342 342 21 773 16,659 Strong economic growth
Special Intervention Measures 108,511 0 0 0 0 Strong economic growth
Enterprise Competitiveness 86,375 93,702 93,702 87,958 87,827 Strong economic growth
Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions 39,413 22,744 22,744 42,251 42,245 Strong economic growth
Policies, Programs and Initiatives 5,712 5,247 5,675 5,161 5,914 Strong economic growth
TotalNote 17 456,111 274,966 275,394 298,079 282,912  

Performance Summary for Internal Services (in thousands of dollars)
  2011-12
Program Activity 2010-11 Actual Spending Main Estimates Planned Spending Total Authorities* Actual Spending*
Internal Services 23,895 21,584 23,509 25,405 23,009
*Excludes amounts allocated to Shared Services Canada.

The 36% reduction in spending between 2010-11 and 2011-12 is primarily attributable to the termination of most Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) initiatives on March 31, 2011. Once the CEAP initiatives terminated, the Agency reverted to its regular budget base.

Explanations concerning expenditures made under the CEAP initiative which continued in 2011-12RInC—are presented in subsection 2.10, entitled Summary of Canada’s Economic Action Plan Initiatives.

For the Infrastructure program activity, total authorities and actual spending are considerably higher than planned spending. This increase is attributable to the reprofiling of funds unused in 2010-11 for RInC, and the bringing forward of completion of construction work on a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines. Detailed explanations with respect to expenditures made for each program activity are also available in section 2.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) outlines the Government of Canada’s commitment to improving the transparency of environmental decision-making by articulating its key environmental goals and targets. The Agency ensures that consideration of these outcomes is an integral part of its decision-making processes. It contributes to the following FSDS themes as denoted by the visual identifiers and associated program activities below.

Theme

Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality Theme I
Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme I Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality
  • Program activity: Community Development
  • Program activity: Enterprise Competitiveness
Theme

Theme IV: Shrinking the Environmental Footprint-Beginning with Government Theme IV
Shrinking the Environmental Footprint-Beginning with Government

Theme IV Shrinking the Environmental Footprint-Beginning with Government
  • Program activity: Internal Services

During 2011-12, the Agency considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.Note 18 Through the strategic environmental assessment process, departmental initiatives were found to have positive environmental effects on goals and targets in Theme I - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality. Further information on the results of strategic environmental assessments is available on the Agency’s website.Note 19

More detailed information on Agency activities in support of sustainable development is available in section 2 of this Departmental Performance Report and on the Agency’s website.Note 20

Further information on the FSDS is also available on the Environment Canada website.Note 21

1.7 Expenditure Profile

The Agency’s actual expenditures for 2011-12 totalled $306 million, including $252.6 million in grants and contributions.

The figure below shows the Agency’s spending trend over the past three years. The hatched part of the columns represents the CEAP portion included, as applicable, in the Agency’s Main Estimates, planned spending, total authorities and actual spending.

Departmental Spending Trend

The Agency’s spending trend is presented in terms of four categories, as follows: (i) Main Estimates, (ii) Planned Spending, (iii) Total Authorities, and (iv) Actual Spending, for 2009-10 through 2011-12. For 2009-10, Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) amounts are added to Total Authorities and Actual Spending. For 2010-11, Main Estimates, Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending include a CEAP portion. For 2011 12,  Total Authorities and Actual Spending include a CEAP portion. The breakdown in millions of dollars for 2009-10 is: (i) 287, (ii) 305, (iii) 445 (including 132 for CEAP) and (iv) 398 (including 113 for CEAP). The breakdown in millions of dollars for 2010-11 is: (i) 429 (including 157 for CEAP),  (ii) 463 (including 192 for CEAP), (iii) 537 (including 231 for CEAP) and (iv) 480 (including 202 for CEAP). The breakdown in millions of dollars for 2011-2012 is: (i) 297, (ii) 299, (iii) 323 (including 17 for CEAP) and (iv) 306 (including 13 for CEAP).

Explanation of Variances

CEAP has had an impact on spending trends in the past few years. In fact, spending associated with CEAP initiatives in 2009-10 stood at $113.1 million and increased in 2010-11, reaching $202.3 million. CEAP initiatives terminated on March 31, 2011, except for RInC, which continued until October 31, 2011. The Agency therefore saw its spending decline in 2011-12 and, all in all, returned to its regular budget base.

For 2011-12, the variance between planned spending and total authorities is primarily attributable to the awarding of supplementary appropriations, including funds for:

  • supporting construction activity associated with recreational infrastructure, under RInC; and
  • strengthening and increasing economic activity in areas affected by the forestry crisis so as to create and maintain employment there, through the TISQFE.

This variance is also partly attributable to implementation of the 2010 Strategic Review, which translated into a smaller grants and contributions budget.

During the same year, the Agency spent close to 95% of the authorities obtained. The variance between actual spending and authorities is relatively minor. Part of the unused funding was carried forward to 2012-13.

Canada’s Economic Action Plan

From 2009-10 to 2011-12, the Agency paid out $328.6 million in support for CEAP. As planned, initiatives implemented by the Agency under that action plan terminated on March 31, 2011, with the exception of RInC, which terminated seven months later. Thus, in 2011-12, actual spending associated with CEAP, and more specifically with RInC, amounted to some $13.2 million (including operating expenditures).

1.8 Estimates by Vote

Information on the Agency’s organizational votes and statutory expenditures is presented in the Public Accounts of Canada 2012 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts may be found on the Public Works and Government Services Canada website under Public Accounts of Canada 2012.Note 22

Notes:

 

2. Analysis of program activities by strategic outcome

This section provides information on the Agency’s strategic outcome, challenges and program activities.

2.1 Strategic Outcome: A Competitive and Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

This strategic outcome reflects the object of the Act establishing the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec,Note 23 which came into effect on October 5, 2005: to promote the development and diversification of the economy of the regions of Quebec.

The Agency’s contributions to Quebec communities and SMEs generated a leverage effect of 2.33. The $775.6 million approved in multiyear financial assistance generated $1.81 billion in investment by promoters and other funding sources.

Challenges Associated With the Strategic Outcome

For Communities

Quebec communities are affected by the economic situation in different ways, depending on their industrial structure.

The economy of many Quebec communities located far from major urban centres is undiversified and based primarily on the harvesting of natural resources. Owing to their heavy dependency on a small number of industries or sectors, these communities are more sensitive to economic fluctuations. On the one hand, high metal prices and the implementation of the Quebec government’s Plan Nord over the past year have stimulated mining communities’ economic activity. On the other hand, the slow pace of the economic recovery in the United States and the difficulties still being experienced by the U.S. real property sector continued to be hard on Quebec’s forestry communities. Diversification of these communities’ economy remains a significant challenge.

As to communities whose economies are based more on the manufacturing sector, they have to continue to adjust to the strong Canadian dollar and competition from emerging nations. To be able to take advantage of globalization and attract investment, several communities have promoted their assets and invested in upgrading their transportation and communication infrastructure. By fostering the development of competitiveness poles and initiatives involving joint action among economic agents, communities strengthen manufacturing firms’ competitiveness in relation to competition from emerging countries.

Over the past year, the Agency has helped Quebec communities increase the dynamism of their economy, notably by supporting projects concerning diversification, entrepreneurial development, infrastructure, promotion of assets and mobilization of regional stakeholders.

For SMEs

Competition from emerging nations along with the strong Canadian dollar continued to generate downward pressure on profit margins and is forcing SMEs to turn toward higher value-added production.

In this context, SMEs have invested significantly in buildings and in machinery and equipment over the past year. These acquisitions have enabled them to expand their work areas and modernize their production chains with a view to increasing their productivity and competitiveness.

Over the past year, the Agency continued to help Quebec SMEs in their growth and competitive positioning efforts, notably by supporting projects involving increased production and innovation capability, market development, commercialization and structuring of sectors.

Program Activities in Line With the Strategic Outcome

In 2011-12, in line with its strategic outcome, the Agency intervened in five areas of activity:

  • Community Development
  • Infrastructure
  • Enterprise Competitiveness
  • Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions
  • Policies, Programs and Initiatives

These program activities were implemented in the form of financial assistance and development support services accessible through the Agency’s business offices and an Infrastructure Directorate. In addition, to support the design and implementation of policies and programs, the Agency analysed the needs of Quebec regions and communities with respect to economic development, in conjunction with its federal and Government of Quebec partners.

Program activities contribute to the attainment of one of the outcomes targeted by the Government of Canada: Strong economic growth. Indeed, observations drawn from the evaluations of the Community Diversification and Business and Regional Growth programs show that the Agency’s two principal programs are aligned with government priorities, and are complementary to intervention from the different levels of government.

In this Departmental Performance Report, each program activity has a descriptive section, a section presenting the performance summary and analysis of the program activity, and a section on lessons learned.

In the section presenting the performance summary, two types of performance data are available.Note 24 First, information is presented on projects for which the Agency made an expenditure in 2011-12, whose results presented are directly associated with expenditures made during that same year. There is also information on the final results targeted by projects funded and terminated prior to 2011-12, for which it was possible to gather data on results obtained over a longer term. These results are associated with expenditures made prior to 2011-12.

2.2 Program Activity: Community Development

Program Activity Description

This program activity enables Quebec regions and communities to maintain and develop their economic activity base by building on their own assets.

Three objectives underpin this program activity. The first, Community Mobilization, fosters communities’ development and increases their mobilization by drawing up visions and projects of local and regional scope. The second, Local Development, assists communities through support for entrepreneurship and creation or maintenance of viable enterprises. The third, Attractive Communities, increases communities’ ability to attract tourists and skilled individuals.

This program activity is primarily targeted at SMEs and NPOs. Two grants and contributions programs supported this program activity in 2011-12: the Community Diversification program, and the (Canada-wide) Community Futures Program.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 25 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 26 Actual Spending
152,931 140,936 130,267

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
88 89 1
Variance Between Planned Spending and Total Authorities

Total authorities were 8% lower than planned spending. This variance is partly attributable to implementation of the 2010 Strategic Review, which led to a reduction in the grants and contributions budget. This decrease also stems from the reallocation of resources available in-house in order to bring forward, on the one hand, funding for construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines and, on the other hand, to support large-scale projects associated with the Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions program activity.

Variance Between Total Authorities and Actual Spending

The 8% variance between total authorities and actual spending is attributable to the fact that certain projects were not implemented on the scale and at the pace anticipated. Part of the unused funding was carried forward to 2012-13.

Community Development Program Activity Performance Summary
Program Activity Expected Results Performance Indicators TargetsNote 27 Actual Results
Communities have capabilities for socio-economic adjustment, and support for emergence of new entrepreneurs and development of local and regional enterprises. Number of communities supported so they mobilize around development challenges 40 34
Number of individuals receiving entrepreneurship services 1,500 1,047Note 28
Number of local and regional enterprises being developed, maintained or established 430 1,039Note 29
Regions attract tourists from outside Quebec and investment, and this generates economic spinoffs within communities. Number of tourism products and services being developed, expanded or upgraded 75 101
Number of tourism products and destinations being marketed outside Quebec 50 74
Number of growth-generating tourism projects and community infrastructure projects supported 13 13

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Over the past year, the price of metals and farm products continued to rise, while the U.S. economy and its real property sector remained fragile. Quebec communities were affected in different ways by this situation, depending on their industrial structure. Thus, economic activity was stronger in mining and farming communities than in forestry and tourism-related communities.

The performance obtained by the Agency in 2011-12 with respect to the Community Development program activity met expectations. It also met one of the Agency’s priorities in 2011-12: Make Quebec communities stronger.

The total valueNote 30 of the 456 projects falling under this program activity in 2011-12 stood at $1.2 billion. An amount of $403.7 million came from the Agency on a multiyear basis. The leverage effect was therefore 2.04, i.e., for each $1 invested by the Agency, $2.04 was invested by the promoter and other funding sources.

Community Mobilization
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

The Agency supported 34 Quebec communitiesNote 31 in their mobilization efforts. Its support was aimed at developing their capabilities for consultation, planning and implementation of development and diversification initiatives.

Local and Regional Enterprises
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

In 2011-12, the Agency supported the creation, maintenance and development of 1,039 enterprises of local or regional scope, surpassing performance expectations compared with the target established in the RPP 2011-12. During the past year, the Agency also supported projects which enabled 1,047 individuals to receive entrepreneurship services.

Among projects supported to foster entrepreneurship:

Centre d’entrepreneuriat et d’essaimage de l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (CEE-UQAC)Note 32

Description: Promotion of entrepreneurship among the student clientele of UQAC and the four regional colleges, while helping Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean SMEs benefit from the expertise available among science and engineering students in the institutions concerned.

Agency’s Contribution: $699,000, out of total costs of $2.2 million.

Main Results: The Centre’s activities have contributed to developing entrepreneurship among students and led to the creation of new enterprises. The Centre has provided individual consultations and group activities for clientele wishing to start out in business. As of March 31, 2012,Note 33 55 individuals have received enterprise startup services. Among participants:

  • 17 individuals have drawn up their business plan;
  • 26 individuals have indicated their intention of starting out in business;
  • 3 enterprises have been started up.

Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

The Agency has observed that two years after the end of the funding provided, 72% of SMEs assisted since 2007 have maintained or increased their sales. This represents an increase of 2 percentage points compared with the result obtained in 2010-11.

Tourism and Community Facilities
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

In 2011-12, the Agency supported 101 projects targeting the development, expansion or enhancement of tourism properties and services, such as cruise piers and other tourist attractions. It thus supported 26 projects more than anticipated when the target was established, since these projects afforded attractive opportunities for reviving the tourism offering and increasing the number of visitors from outside Quebec.

The Agency also supported 74 projects for commercialization of tourism products and destinations, much the same number as the previous year. These were such projects as festivals and other major events aimed at increasing the number of tourists from outside Quebec and generating economic spinoffs within communities.

The Agency also contributed, as planned, to the completion of seven growth-generating tourism projects, including the introduction of a rail shuttle, the Train du Massif de Charlevoix, and redevelopment of segments of the Véloroute des Bleuets bicycle route. Also, the Agency supported six projects targeting the development, expansion or modernization of community infrastructure. This included projects for development of industrial and tourism infrastructure and projects for the deployment of broadband networks.

Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

The tourism industry was characterized over the past few years by a decline in tourism, a Canada-wide phenomenon. Despite this context, tourism projects supported by the Agency posted growth in the number of visitors and increased sales.

Thus, since 2007, 82% of the tourism products developed or commercialized increased their visits from tourists from outside Quebec.Note 34 Over the same period, 81% of the tourism products developed or growth-generating projects implemented increased their sales or self-generated revenues.

Community Futures Program

Under the Community Futures Program (CFP), the Agency provided financial support to local and regional development agencies, specifically 56 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) located in designated rural regions and 10 Business Development Centres (BDCs) in peri-urban areas. In 2011-12, the Agency spent $28.5 million to support these organizations.

As of March 31, 2012, CFDCs and BDCs had achieved the following results through their current projects:Note 35

  • a total of $83.5 million invested in startup enterprises
  • 646 jobs generated in the 192 enterprises created
  • 4,866 jobs created and maintained in the 439 expanding enterprises
  • 1,248 enterprises in acquisition, recovery, expansion or modernization received guidance
    services.

In 2011-12, the Agency used Statistics Canada data to compare the performance of enterprises assisted under the CFP with that of similar enterprises not receiving financial assistance through that program. This analysis revealed that CFP results were positive. For instance, the percentage of annual employment growth is higher in enterprises assisted by CFDCs (+9.4%) than in the comparison group (+4.8%). The annual variation in sales follows the same trend, with a larger increase in enterprises supported by CFP (+13.4%) than in enterprises in the comparison group (+9.6%).

Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies

Of the 456 projects supported which come under the Community Development program activity, the Agency funded, through the TISQFE,Note 36 64 projects from communities affected by the forestry crisis, for a total of $20.1 million in contribution expenditures. These primarily involve projects aimed at the creation and development of local and regional enterprises, but also projects for community mobilization and development of the tourism offering.

Among the projects supported through the TISQFE is a Canada-Quebec Agreement, signed in 2011, which targets job creation and maintenance in the communities affected by the forestry crisis. The agreement therefore provides for the undertaking of reforestation and forest maintenance work which should lead to job creation in a traditional sector essential to the Canadian and Quebec economies, as well as contribute to the maintenance of a skilled labour force in regions affected by the forestry crisis. The joint contribution of the Government of Canada and the Government of Quebec amounts to $40 million over two years. The Agency paid out $12 million during the first year of implementation.

Economic Development Initiative

Through the Economic Development Initiative (EDI)Note 37 dedicated to official language minority communities in Quebec, the Agency over the last year also supported 20 diversification and entrepreneurship projects with positive impacts in English-speaking communities, for a total of $2.1 million in contribution expenditures.Note 38

Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers

The Agency also continued its support for international cruise development, in order to contribute to strengthening the economies of various regions and communities. It spent $9.6 million in 2011-12 to support 27 projects in connection with cruise development.

During the formative evaluation of this initiative,Note 39 all key stakeholders expressed themselves satisfied with it. Discussions held locally before the initiative was designed facilitated identification of needs and promotion of the initiative. For local stakeholders, the Initiative meets needs, since without government intervention it would be impossible to develop that sector.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

As part of its contribution to Theme I of the FSDSAddressing Climate Change and Air Quality—the Agency funded, to the tune of $15.8 million, 36 projects, of which 14 come under the Local and Regional Enterprises program subactivity, to support community development.Note 40 These projects concern promoters who could, among other things, implement projects to optimize resource use, exploit residual resources and contribute to eco-efficiency, while ensuring enhanced performance for enterprises.Note 41

Lessons Learned

The summative evaluation of the Community Diversification program showed that the conditions prevailing when that program was created still exist. In financial terms, most of the projects by SMEs and NPOs could not have been carried out without funding from the program.

Among documented results, the program evaluation noted that local and regional SMEs supported directly by the Agency increased or maintained their sales (79% of projects) and their number of jobs (91% of projects) despite the unfavourable economic context. Since the Agency did not set results targets for the program, it was not possible to know to what extent the program contributed to attaining the anticipated intermediate results. Since that evaluation, the Agency has resolved this challenge by developing targets for this type of activity.

2.3 Program Activity: Infrastructure

Program Activity Description

This program activity helps upgrade urban and rural municipal infrastructure in Quebec and enhance citizens’ quality of life by investing in projects that improve the quality of the environment, sustain long-term economic growth, upgrade community facilities and establish 21st-Century infrastructure through the adoption of the best technology, new approaches and best practices.

In conjunction with the provinces, territories, municipalities, First Nations and the private sector, the Government of Canada has implemented different joint infrastructure programs. The Agency has the special mandate to manage the Canada-Quebec Agreement concerning infrastructure programs. Projects that contribute to attaining the program objectives are those which improve water quality, find solutions to the problem of wastewater discharge, foster the safe movement of individuals and goods, improve public transit and help enhance citizens’ quality of life through the construction of infrastructure, facilities or buildings with urban or regional economic impact.

This program activity is primarily targeted at municipalities and NPOs.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 42 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 43 Actual Spending
342 21,773 16,659

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
3 8 5

The tables presenting financial and human resources for the Infrastructure program activity include resources associated with the Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) program.

Total authorities were substantially higher than planned spending. This increase is attributable to the reprofiling for RInC of funding unused in 2010-11, and the bringing forward of completion of construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines.

Actual spending for 2011-12 was 23% lower than authorities obtained. Actual expenditures depend on progress in the execution of infrastructure projects. Under agreements signed with the Government of Canada, the Quebec government prioritizes the selection of the projects and follows up on them.

Canada’s Economic Action Plan Initiative

Recreational Infrastructure Canada Program

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 44 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 45 Actual Spending
0 16,793 13,228

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
0 4 4

Information on planned spending and human resources for RInC was not available at the time the Agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2011-12 was prepared.

Actual spending for 2011-12 was 21% lower than authorities obtained. Actual expenditures depend on progress in the execution of projects. Under the agreement signed with the Government of Canada, the Quebec government prioritizes the selection of the projects and follows up on them.

Infrastructure Program Activity Performance Summary
RInC Expected ResultsNote 46 Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Increase in economic opportunities Demonstration of link between projects and economic opportunities The impact is seen through examples and case studies. See the Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity section.
Partnership with Quebec and communities Level of investment by other participants (province, municipalities, etc.) compared with federal contribution For each $1 of federal contribution, at least $2 comes from the other partners. For $1 of federal contribution, $3.23 comes from the other partners.
Increase in construction activity related to recreational infrastructure Number of projects successfully completed As per agreement with Quebec government 209 projects were successfully completed.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The Agency contributes, through the delivery of several federal programs, to the upgrading of infrastructure in Quebec, in line with Government of Canada priorities. RInC, announced in January 2009 and administered by the Agency, is a CEAP initiative intended to provide short-term economic stimulus. Initially scheduled to last two years, this program has helped increase construction activity for the refurbishment of many recreational infrastructure facilities in Quebec, as well as creating jobs. In December 2010, the Government of Canada made the decision to extend the program so as to enable certain projects, on the basis of defined criteria, to be continued. RInC terminated on October 31, 2011.

In 2011-12, the Agency’s performance with respect to the Infrastructure program activity met all expectations.

Performance Observed From Projects Funded under RInC

A total of 209 projects were carried out under RInC. Total federal contributions for RInC projects stood at $68.8 million, for $291.5 million in total costs.

Among RInC projects contributing to a community’s economic and sports development:

Modernization of André-Richard Arena

Description: Completion of various items of major rehabilitation work, in particular replacement of the refrigeration system and renovation of the building structure, at the André-Richard Arena in Beauharnois.

Agency’s Contribution: $1 million, out of total costs of $3.9 million.

Main Results: A modern arena catering to the needs of some 500 recreational hockey players and skaters and the local population of Beauharnois, which can be used to host tournaments and competitions, as well as day camps during the summertime.

The Agency is also one of the federal partners responsible for the delivery of certain infrastructure programs through service charters with Infrastructure Canada. In this context, over the past year the Agency continued implementation of the Building Canada Fund (BCF) and the supplement to the BCF Communities component, which notably involved the introduction of projects for revitalization or construction of infrastructure for water supply, sewer systems and drinking water and wastewater treatment. The Agency also continued to manage the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) and the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF) agreements. The performance summary with respect to the BCF, the MRIF, and the CSIF may be found in Infrastructure Canada’s DPR.Note 47

Contribution Program to Fund Construction of a Gas Pipeline Between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines

The Agency supported construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines with a view to providing the Thetford Mines area with access to natural gas. It spent $3 million in 2011-12 on this program, which is to terminate in 2014.

Lessons Learned

Following the Government of Canada’s decision to extend the termination date of RInC to October 31, 2011, the Agency asked its partners to produce bimonthly follow-up reports on the progress of work and project completion dates. These made it possible to conduct improved project follow-up in order to ensure that they were completed in time.

2.4 Program Activity: Special Intervention Measures

Program Activity Description

This program activity assists communities and regions undergoing major economic shocks. In such situations, when additional dedicated funding is made available from the Government of Canada, the Agency temporarily puts in place special adjustment measures enabling communities to support their economic activity and initiate steps to help them find a new balance or economic stability.

No expenditures were made in 2011-12 with respect to this program activity.

2.5 Program Activity: Enterprise Competitiveness

Program Activity Description

This program activity helps enterprises perform better and be more competitive by enhancing productivity and increasing earned revenue; this contributes to creating conditions conducive to sustainable growth.

Two objectives underpin this program activity. The first, Development of Enterprises’ Capacity, fosters the improvement of capabilities with respect to management, innovation, adoption of advanced technology, market development, and integration with globalized production chains. In particular, it encourages support for organizations dedicated to improving SMEs’ strategic capabilities in order to enhance their performance and contribute to their adjustment. The second objective, Strategic Enterprises, supports the establishment and first phases of expansion of enterprises in economic activities deemed strategic for a region’s development so as to consolidate its economic base.

This program activity is targeted primarily at SMEs and NPOs, and was supported in 2011-12 by the Business and Regional Growth grants and contributions program.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 48 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 49 Actual Spending
93,702 87,958 87,827

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
85 82 (3)

Total planned spending is 6% higher than authorities. This variance is primarily attributable to the reallocation of resources available in-house to support large-scale projects associated with the Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions program activity. Nearly all available authorities were spent.

Program Activity Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual ResultsNote 50
Enterprises assisted are high-performance and competitive. Number of enterprises supported in strategic management, market development or value chain management 1,150 4,280
Number of innovative enterprises involved in an innovation management approach 200 679
Number of innovative enterprises in startup or pre-startup phase 100 153

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

Over the past year, despite the context of uncertainty and the slow pace of economic recovery, Quebec SMEs have taken advantage of the strong Canadian dollar and low interest rates to invest significantly in buildings and in machinery and equipment. These acquisitions have enabled them to expand their work areas and modernize their production chains with a view to increasing their productivity and competitiveness.

That is the context in which the Agency helped SMEs become more competitive by supporting them, in particular, in their projects targeting greater productivity, enhanced capabilities for development and commercialization of innovative products and processes, and in new market development.

The performance obtained by the Agency in 2011-12 with respect to the Enterprise Competitiveness program activity surpassed the expectations presented in the corresponding RPP. It met one of the Agency’s priorities: Help SMEs Become More Competitive.

The total value of the 483 projects under this program activity in 2011-12 amounted to $926 million, of which $193.2 million came from the Agency on a multiyear basis. The leverage effect was therefore 3.79, meaning that for each $1 invested by the Agency, $3.79 was invested by the promoter and other funding sources.

Enterprises’ Strategic Capabilities
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

In 2011-12, the Agency supported, directly or through intermediary groups, development of strategic capabilities and implementation of development projects in 4,280 enterprises, including 670 in strategic management, 2,475 in market development and 1,135 in value chain management.

Among enterprises supported for development of their strategic capability:

Acquisio incNote 51

Description: Acquisio is an enterprise of international scope located in Saint-Lambert which provides marketing search engine services to major corporations. In particular, it targets commercialization on the European and U.S. markets of software to manage advertising campaigns for the purchase of keywords on search engines.

Agency’s Contribution: $480,000, out of total costs of $960,000.

Main Expected Results: Investment of $960,000 and the creation of 11 new jobs.

Over the past year, a special effort was made by the Agency to support projects targeting enhanced productivity. Thus, in 2011-12 it devoted 18.6% of its grants and contributions spendingNote 52 to supporting value chain management projects, whereas since 2007-08 it had been earmarking an average of 11.4% of its spending to such projects. These are usually short-term projects, whose main activity is the purchase of equipment to support the production chain. In addition, the Agency also helped 679 enterprises involved in innovation management approaches.

The Agency also continued its support in 2011-12 for the two Canada Business Network services centres in Quebec: Info entrepreneurs in Montréal, and Ressources entreprises in Québec City. These service centres provide information and referral services to guide entrepreneurs toward specialized resources. These two centres responded to close to 23,500 information requests over the past year.

Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

Two years after Agency funding ended, 51% of enterprises receiving assistance since 2007 in the development of their strategic capabilities maintained or increased their sales, whereas 42% of enterprises increased their international sales. The strong Canadian dollar and difficulties encountered by SMEs with exporting to the USA, Canada’s main economic partner, were factors that limited the results attained.

Furthermore, cumulative results gathered over the past five years at the Agency showed that, two years after funding ended, 52% of enterprises receiving assistance for management of their value chain saw their productivity increase. Analysis of the results obtained annually revealed that the proportion of enterprises assisted which increase their productivity is tending to grow over time. Between 2007 and 2009, 42% of enterprises supported saw their productivity rise, up from 55% in 2010 and 59% in 2011.

Strategic Enterprises
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

The Agency supported 153 innovative enterprises in startup or pre-startup phase, notably through business incubators; this corresponds to the number of enterprises receiving assistance the previous year. The Agency also helped 10 companies whose investment should have a major impact on jobs or surrounding enterprises, particularly among local subcontractors.

Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

Two years after funding ended, 73% of innovative enterprises in startup phase that were helped directly by the Agency since 2007 were still in operation, despite the fact that these were mainly high-risk projects in view of the uncertainty concerning the profitability of innovation.

Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies

Of the 483 projects supported in 2011-12 that fell under the Enterprise Competitiveness program activity, the Agency backed, through the TISQFE, 70 projects from communities affected by the forestry crisis, totalling contribution expenditures of $9.2 million. Most of these projects concerned development of enterprises’ capability with regard to value chain management and innovation management.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

As part of its contribution to Theme I of the FSDS - Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality - the Agency funded 65 projects, to the tune of $14.3 million, to support enterprise competitiveness. These projects are included in the two program subactivities specifically targeted in the Agency’s Sustainable Development Strategy, namely, Enterprises’ Strategic Capabilities and Strategic Enterprises. These projects target promoters who could, among other things, start up enterprises in green sectors or implement projects to optimize resource use, exploit residual resources or contribute to eco-efficiency, while enhancing enterprises’ competitiveness.Note 53

Lessons Learned

The summative evaluation showed that the Agency’s intervention in relation to enterprises contributed to increasing their sales. This increase was higher for projects targeting innovation management. In that regard, projects supported by the Agency under the Strategic Enterprises program subactivity, and primarily Pre-startup and Startup of Innovative Enterprises, generated jobs, thus contributing to strengthening the regions’ economic base.

This sound performance is confirmed by the Statistics Canada study which demonstrates that enterprises supported by the Agency during 2002-2009 performed better than a group of comparable enterprises in terms of their sales growth, productivity (sales per employee) and survival rate. The Agency plans to continue carrying out this study on the economic impact in conjunction with Statistics Canada in order to measure the long-term benefits of intervention with respect to enterprises and determine the net effect of intervention.

2.6 Program Activity: Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions

Program Activity Description

This program activity improves regions’ international competitiveness by enhancing their competitive advantages on the world stage. It has two objectives. The first, Growth Poles, develops and consolidates growth poles by fostering innovation and networking among knowledge players (universities, research institutes and centres, enterprises and groups of enterprises, and technology brokers), development of a critical mass of knowledge, and enhancement and transfer of technology.

The second objective, International Promotion of Regions, involves enhancing the international competitiveness of Quebec regions through integrated promotion of locational factors (labour force, market access, infrastructure, costs, etc.), attraction of direct foreign investment and reinvestment by foreign enterprises already established in Quebec.

This program activity mainly targets SMEs and NPOs and is supported by the Business and Regional Growth grants and contributions program.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 54 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 55 Actual Spending
22,744 42,251 42,245

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
11 17 6

Total authorities were 86% higher than planned spending. This difference is largely attributable to the awarding of contributions for three projects, including the INO (national optics institute), for which the authorities for 2011-12 were $18.7 million, a sum which was not anticipated at the time the Agency’s RPP 2011-12 was prepared. Almost all the available authorities were spent.

Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions Program Activity Performance Summary
Program Activity Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Sectors and regions enhance their competitive positioning. Number of clusters and networks in development in niches defined by business offices 15 17
Number of institutions supported for performing technology transfer in co operation with enterprises 10 28

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

In the face of enterprises’ increasing globalization, stronger competitive pressure and the growing importance of integrating with global value chains, Quebec enterprises and regions have to collaborate more closely in order to stand out on international markets. In supporting the development of competitiveness poles and the promotion of Quebec communities, the Agency contributes to enhancing enterprises’ and communities’ international competitiveness and integrating them into the knowledge economy.

Overall, the performance obtained by the Agency in 2011-12 with respect to the Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions program activity surpassed the targets established in the corresponding RPP.

The total value of the 89 projects falling under this program activity in 2011-12 stood at $433 million. Of this amount, $178.4 million came from the Agency on a multiyear basis. The leverage effect was therefore 1.43, meaning that for each $1 invested by the Agency, $1.43 was invested by the promoter and other funding sources.

Growth Poles
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

In 2011-12, 17 business networks and sectoral clusters in development in priority areas were supported by the Agency, to the tune of $1.6 million. This support was aimed at the carrying-out of plans and studies with a view to developing their capabilities, as well as the implementation of development projects with enterprises.

The Agency also supported 28 centres for technology transfer. Notably, it continued its support, initiated in 2010-11, for the purchase of specialized equipment, with a view to helping college technology transfer centres (CTTC) offer services to enterprises aimed at enhancing their innovation capabilities.

The Agency supported technology transfer projects aimed at improving the competitive positioning of a sector experiencing strong global growth. One such project was:

Biopterre - Bioproducts Development CentreNote 56

Description: Support for this CTTC located in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region is aimed at enabling it to acquire equipment for biomass conversion and development of bioproducts with a view to increasing this centre’s intervention capability with respect to its clientele. Innovations associated with biomass and biochar have applications in several sectors, such as energy and environment, and industrial applications.

Agency’s Contribution: $680,850, out of total costs of $801,000.

Main Results: Will enable enterprises to benefit from comprehensive guidance in the execution of technological development projects concerning products and processes for the entire biomass and biochar value chain. It will also foster the exploitation of residues for high-potential alternative uses.


Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

Since 2007, Agency support with respect to research and development centres has contributed to the completion of 1,370 technology research and development projects. These innovative projects enable SMEs to adopt technology and be more productive, so they are better able to meet the demands of tomorrow’s economy.

International Promotion of Regions
Performance Observed From Projects Funded in 2011-12

Over the past year, two international promotion agencies enhancing the locational factors of Quebec regions received Agency support. Montréal International, one of the two organizations supported, conducted a study in 2011 on the main attractions in Montréal.Note 57

Extent of Achievement of Targeted Final Results

Projects for international promotion of regions supported since 2007 have fostered the establishment of or reinvestment by 116 foreign firms in Quebec, including 28 in 2011-12, as well as support for establishment or maintenance of 17 international organizations (IOs), 15 of which are still established. According to a study conducted for Montréal International, the recurrent net economic spinoffs from international organizations established in Montréal are significant. In 2010, the value-added generated by IOs established in Montréal was gauged at $219 million.Note 58

Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies

Of the 89 projects supported in 2011-12 which came under the Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions program activity, the Agency supported, through the TISQFE, 12 projects targeted primarily at the execution of technology transfers, for which contribution expenditures amounted to $2.2 million.

Lessons Learned

For the Competitiveness Poles and International Promotion of Regions program subactivities, the quantitative data gathered following the summative evaluation of the Business and Regional Growth program do not make it possible to gauge the contribution to results. The results obtained by NPO projects have to be observed in the NPOs’ own clientele, and this makes longer-term performance tracking harder for the Agency, since few organizations have this tracking capability.

The three case studies conducted nevertheless illustrated how NPOs supported financially by the Agency have contributed positively, through their action (involving technology transfer, networking and international promotion) with respect to enterprises, to the development of poles or sectors. Performance measurement strategies for the QEDP, in effect since April 1, 2012, will include a data collection strategy leading to better documentation of the results of projects implemented through NPOs offering services to enterprises.

2.7 Program Activity: Policies, Programs and Initiatives

Program Activity Description

This program activity enables Quebec regions and communities to benefit from adapted, consistent and effective federal action that produces socio-economic spinoffs, notably by generating and disseminating economic development knowledge that is helpful to development agents and by seizing business and development opportunities. Four objectives underpin this program activity: analysis and research; policies and programs; representation and influence; and co operation and collaboration.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 59 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total AuthoritiesNote 60 Actual Spending
5,675 5,161 5,914

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
44 47 3

The difference between planned spending, total authorities and actual spending represents normal variance under regular management of operations.

Policies, Programs and Initiatives Program Activity Performance Summary
Program Activity Expected Result Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
The Agency’s policies, programs and initiatives are aimed at reinforcing the economy of communities and regions. Number and nature of research projects carried out in connection with regional development Research projects are carried out in connection with regional development issues. Three out of the five research projects approved were completed in 2011-12.
Number and nature of policies developed and initiatives implemented Policies, programs and initiatives correspond to the development needs of Quebec enterprises and communities. The Agency modernized, simplified and adapted its different intervention tools, including its programs.
Number of events (e.g., missions, awareness days, etc.) piloted by the Agency in Quebec to promote SMEs’ capabilities Under the Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy, events are held in co-operation with partners in order to meet needs established by prime contractors. The Agency took part in 11 forums and conferences, in which more than 200 enterprises in Quebec participated, under the Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy.

Performance Summary and Analysis of Program Activity

The performance obtained by the Agency in 2011-12 with respect to the Policies, Programs and Initiatives program activity met expectations. The Agency took steps with regard to each of the objectives associated with the program activity, with a view to increasing communities’ vitality and reinforcing the competitiveness and performance of Quebec enterprises and regions.

Analysis and Research

Research projects in relation to regional development issues were carried out. Under the Regional Development Research program, whose objective is to generate and disseminate regional economic development knowledge that is helpful for development agents, the Agency approved five projects following the call for proposals launched in 2009, of which three were completed in 2011-12:

  1. Study on Assistance with the Internationalization of Small and Medium-Size Quebec EnterprisesNote 61
  2. Integrating Quebec SMEs Into Production Networks: A Spur to CompetitivenessNote 62
  3. SME Manufacturers in Quebec: Adding Services to Boost Competitiveness and the Bottom LineNote 63

The Agency also took part in research collaboration agreements which led to the completion of eight studies and 12 presentations with the Conference Board of Canada’s International Trade and Investment Centre and the publication of 28 newsletters from the Smart Practices Innovation Network.

Policies and Programs

In 2011-12, the Agency modernized, simplified and adapted its intervention tools, including its Program Activity Architecture, performance measurement framework, Quebec Economic Development Program and priorities, and the tools associated with their implementation. The Agency thus enjoys harmonized, simplified programs, policies and initiatives leading to coherent intervention, in line with government priorities and corresponding to the development needs of Quebec enterprises and communities.

The work carried out by the Agency with respect to its policies and programs meets one of the Agency’s priorities for 2011-12: Update Policy Directions and Develop New Programs.

Representation, Influence and Collaboration

In 2011-12, the Agency revamped its efforts with respect to representation, influence and collaboration, targeting them more closely, while aligning them more tightly with government priorities. These efforts enabled Quebec regions and communities to be better informed and equipped to influence government action with respect to economic development so it is more closely geared to the regions’ specific realities. The Agency is also building more than ever on concerted action with federal and other partners, as issues, needs or opportunities arise.

More specifically, the efforts deployed by the Agency over the past year translated into:

  • Participation by the Agency in 11 forums and conferences within the framework of implementation of the Industrial and Regional Benefits Policy (including eight Canada-wide and three international events)

    The Agency’s participation in these forums and conferences facilitated the holding of more than 40 meetings bringing together the Agency with national and international prime contractors involved in major government procurement projects. These strategic gatherings led to the staging of five industry days and six awareness days, in which more than 200 Quebec enterprises took part. For instance, in February 2012, the Agency organized an industry day with General Dynamics Land Systems - Canada (GDLS) to help that corporation identify potential partners in the project to upgrade light armoured vehicles. In all, GDLS met with 34 SMEs and, to date, a number of them have initiated discussions concerning subsequent steps.
     
  • Collaboration with the other federal agencies responsible for government-wide funds and initiatives. This collaboration led to increased promotion of those initiatives and funds, in particular the Investments in Forest Industry TransformationNote 64 program, Canada’s Federal Tourism StrategyNote 65 and the ecoENERGY Innovation InitiativeNote 66, to regional stakeholders, and to a better understanding on the part of national authorities of the capabilities existing in the regions. This intervention also made it possible to carry out promotion to Quebec enterprises and organizations and encourage them to take part by forming consortiums.

Lessons Learned

In line with its policies and programs, the Agency simplified its Program Activity Architecture (PAA) and its regular program so as to ensure simpler, clearer reporting. The Agency’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2012-13 was drafted on the basis of the new PAA. The Agency has also upgraded its performance measurement tools so as to increase the reliability of the data collected and reduce the administrative burden. The number of performance indicators has thus been significantly reduced, while the timeliness of the information to be gathered in that regard has been increased.

2.8 Program Activity: Internal Services

Program Activity Description

Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to meet the needs of an organization’s programs and other general obligations. They include: management and monitoring services; communications services; legal services; human resources management services; financial management services; information management services; information technology services; asset management services; materiel management services; acquisitions management services; travel management services; and other administrative services. Internal services include only those activities and resources directed at the organization as a whole, and not those provided solely to a specific program.

2011-12 Financial ResourcesNote 67 (in thousands of dollars)
Planned Spending Total Authorities*Note 68 Actual Spending*
23,509 25,405 23,009

2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
Planned Actual Difference
168 163 (5)
*These data exclude amounts assigned to Shared Services Canada.

Total authorities are 8% higher than planned spending, and the difference between total authorities and actual spending equals 9%, representing normal financial variance under regular management of operations.

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Agency is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to the Greening Government Operations targets through the Internal Services program activity, particularly with respect to the following elements:

  • Surplus electronic and electrical equipment
  • Printing unit reduction
  • Paper consumption
  • Green meetings
  • Green procurement

For additional details on the Agency’s Greening Government Operations activities, please see the List of Supplementary Information Tables in Section 3.

2.9 Changes to Government Structure

Impacts on Financial and Human Resources Resulting From the Establishment of Shared Services Canada (SSC).

The following tables contain data on the human and financial resources that were transferred to SSC, as well as expenditures incurred on behalf of SSC.

2011-12 Financial Resources (in thousands of dollars)
  Planned Spending Total Authorities*
Net transfer post Orders in Council (OIC) to Shared Services Canada (SSC)** - 720
* Pursuant to section 31.1 of the Financial Administration Act and Orders in Council P.C. 2011-0881, P.C. 2011-0877 and P.C. 2011-1297, the amount of $720,368 was deemed to have been appropriated to Shared Services Canada. This resulted in a reduction in the appropriation for the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec.

** Total authorities, as presented in the 2011-12 Financial Resources” table (and other relevant tables) in the “Summary of Performance” section, is the net of any transfers to SSC. Actual spending does not include expenditures incurred on behalf of SSC as of the OIC date.
2011-12 Human Resources (FTEs)
  Planned ActualNote 69
FTEs deemed to SSC - 2

2.10 Summary of Canada’s Economic Action Plan Initiatives

In 2009, in addition to its regular programming, the Agency implemented ad-hoc initiatives of two years’ duration, in support of the communities and sectors hardest hit by the economic downturn.

Initiative: Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC) Program

The RInC program was a Canada-wide initiative aimed at contributing to mitigating the impact of the recent economic downturn by increasing the total value of construction activities associated with recreational infrastructure. While initially introduced as a two-year program, RInC was extended by the Government of Canada until October 31, 2011. The goal of projects funded by this program was primarily to modernize, repair, replace or expand existing recreational infrastructure, such as swimming pools, arenas and sports fields. Details concerning RInC performance and expenditures are presented in section 2.3 (Program Activity: Infrastructure).

Notes:

 

3. Supplementary information

3.1 Financial Highlights

The financial highlights presented in this report are intended to provide an overview of the Agency’s operations and financial position. The unaudited financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and are available on the Agency’s website.

Actual expenditures presented in the preceding tables were prepared on a cash basis, while the financial highlights that follow were prepared on an accrual basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to the Agency’s financial statements (note 3).

During 2011-12, the Agency adopted the revised Treasury Board accounting policy TBAS 1.2: Departmental and Agency Financial Statements. Under this policy, the Agency is required to present the net debt represented by liabilities minus financial assets. Revenues, expenses and related accounts receivable and payable are now presented with deductions made of the amounts of non-disposable revenue to be paid out once again and associated expenses in the Agency’s statement of results and net financial position and the statement of financial position. To comply with this standard, the amounts for 2010-11 were reclassified in order to facilitate comparison from one year to another.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
Condensed statement of financial position
As at March 31, 2012 (in thousands of dollars)
Change % 2011-12 2010-2011
(Restated)
Total net liabilities (8%) 97,391 106,399
Total net financial assets (7%) 89,998 96,744
Departmental net debt (23%) 7,393 9,655
Total non-financial assets (56%) 1,593 3,641
Departmental net financial position (4%) (5,800) (6,014)

Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
Condensed statement of financial operations
For the period ending March 31, 2012
(in thousands of dollars)
Change % 2011-12 2010-2011
(Restated)
Total expenses (39%) 227,338 373,384
Total revenues - 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers (39%) 227,338 373,384
Departmental net financial position (4%) (5,800) (6,014)

3.2 Financial Highlights—Charts and Graphs

For the period ending March 31, 2012

3.2.1 Liabilities

Liabilities are broken down into three items, as follows: (i) Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities (92.3%), (ii) Future Fringe Benefits (5.8%) and (iii) Vacation Pay and Compensatory Leave (1.9%).

  • The total net amount of liabilities stood at $97.4 million at the end of 2011-12, down 8% from 2010-11. The decrease is attributable to a decline in accounts payable at the end of the fiscal year and to lower obligations with respect to fringe benefits following the payment of separation allowances to several employees.
  • Accounts payable and accrued liabilities represented the largest part of liabilities, with 92.3% of the net total, for an amount of $89.9 million.
  • Vacation pay and compensatory leave amounted to $1.8 million, and fringe benefits to $5.7 million.

3.2.2 Assets

Assets are broken down into five items, as follows: (i) Amounts Due From the Consolidated Revenue Fund (98.1%), (ii) Loans (0.0%), (iii) Tangible Capital (1.5%), (iv) Prepaid Expenses (0.3%) and (v) Accounts Receivable (0.2%).

  • As of March 31, 2012, net financial assets stood at $90 million, down 7% from the previous year’s total. This decrease is attributable to the decline in accounts payable at the end of the fiscal year for which the Agency will be receiving funds during another year.
  • Amounts due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund constitute the largest component of net financial assets, representing 99.8% of the latter or 98.1% of total assets. The remainder of net financial assets consists of the Agency’s accounts receivable.
  • The Agency’s loans held entirely on behalf of the government stood at $245.0 million at the end of 2011-12, representing a 14% rise attributable to the increase in loans.
  • The amount of non-financial assets stood at $1.6 million at the end of 2011-12, down 56% from 2010-11, mainly owing to the transfer of tangible capital to Shared Services Canada. Prepaid expenses accounted for 0.3%, and tangible capital for 1.5% of total assets.

3.2.3 Expenses

Expenses are broken down among the seven program activities and the Transferred Activities and Expenses Incurred on Government’s Behalf, as follows: (i) Community Development (56.2%), (ii) Special Intervention Measures ( 0.8%), (iii) Infrastructure (5.8%), (iv) Enterprise Competitiveness (13.2%), (v) Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions (18.5%), (vi) Policies, Programs and Initiatives (2.8%), (vii) Internal Services (10.4%), (viii) Expenses Incurred on Government’s Behalf (-6.4%) and (ix) Transferred Activities (0.4%).

  • Total net expenses amounted to $227.3 million in 2011-12, down $146 million (39%) compared with total expenses the previous year.
  • Expenses consisted primarily of transfer payments, i.e., expenses with respect to non-repayable contributions and conditional-repayment contributions, which totalled $169.3 million in 2011-12; this was down 45% from the previous year’s total and explains the reduction in total expenses. This decrease was primarily attributable to the termination of most initiatives set up under CEAP and implementation of the 2010 Strategic Review aimed at reducing the grants and contributions budget.
  • Funds net of expenses incurred on the government’s behalf ($14.5 million) and transferred activities ($0.9 million) helped foster Quebec’s economic development through the following seven program activities:
    • Community Development: $120.5 million
    • Infrastructure: $13.1 million
    • Special Intervention Measures: -$1.1 million
    • Enterprise Competitiveness: $19.4 million
    • Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions: $44.5 million
    • Policies, Programs and Initiatives: $6.4 million
    • Internal Services: $23.6 million.
  • Operating expenses were down $4.1 million compared with 2010-11. This decrease is primarily attributable to the reduction in salary expenses and professional services.

3.2.4 Revenues

Total revenues for the Agency are zero, since they are all earned on the government’s behalf. For reference, revenues earned on the government’s behalf stood at $863,000 in 2011-12, up 23% from the total revenues for the previous fiscal year associated with amounts billed as interest.

3.3 Financial Statements

The Agency’s unaudited financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2012 and the appendix containing the statement of management responsibility, including internal control with respect to management financial reporting, are available on the Agency’s website.

3.4 List of Supplementary Information Tables

Electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2011-12 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the Agency’s website.

Table: Greening Government Operations

The table presents the results obtained with respect to five greening of government operations goals from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

Table: User Fees Reporting

The table presents user fee revenue and costs.

Table: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

The table illustrates the results of TPPs in relation to commitments and planned results as set out in the 2011-12 RPP where the amount of the transfer exceeds $5 million.

Table: Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

The table lists responses given to Parliamentary Committee reports, Auditor General of Canada reports and external audits concerning Agency activities in 2011-12.

Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue

The table illustrates revenue and provides a historical perspective. Revenue consists primarily of repayments of the repayable contributions awarded by the Agency.

Table: Internal Audits and Evaluations

The table lists internal audit and evaluation reports.

 

4. Other items of interest

4.1 Agency Contact Information

Pierre Bordeleau
Executive Director
Corporate Services

Economic Development Agency of Canada
for the Regions of Quebec
Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montréal, Quebec H3B 2T9
Telephone: 514-283-4565
Fax: 514-496-5449
E-mail: pierre.bordeleau@dec-ced.gc.ca

4.2 Additional Information

Within the framework of its transformation, the Agency recently renewed its economic development vision and its programs, while simplifying its Program Activity Architecture (PAA) and performance measurement. Thus, information on the Agency’s PAA and programs in this DPR 2011-12 does not correspond to the programs in effect since April 1, 2012 as published on the Agency’s website.

Agency Performance Measurement Methodology

1. Tracking of Projects

In the field of economic development, expected results are rarely observed during the year of the expenditure.

For instance, it is only after one or two years that the impact of an enterprise’s development activities on its sales is seen. The same is true for many activities supported through Agency programs, whether in market development, technology transfer or enterprise creation.

To report on the use of funding awarded to the Agency in 2011-12 and on intermediate results recorded since 2007—the year in which the current performance measurement strategy was implemented—two main baselines are used in this report:

  1. Projects for which an expenditure was made in 2011-12. This baseline tells us about the number of economic development agents who received financial assistance from the Agency in 2011-12 and about the immediate results targeted.
  2. Projects which have reached the date scheduled in their agreement for attaining results that were expected in the longer term (e.g., impact on enterprises’ sales). This baseline makes it possible to measure the impact of Agency programs on community diversification and business and regional growth. It is associated with expenditures made before 2011-12, primarily between 2007 and 2010.
2. Data Collection for Performance Information
a. Reliability of Performance Data

The current system for gathering performance data has been in place since April 1, 2007. It is based on the tracking of project results by business office advisors conducted as part of regular agreement follow-up activities. Instructions for using and inputting appropriate indicators and quality controls ensure consistent data entry into the Agency’s management information system.

The collection strategy for measuring the impact of intermediary groups’ (IGs’) intervention with respect to the clientele was not applied this year. This weakness is offset in this report by the presentation of concrete examples of results from projects funded this year. Furthermore, the methodology used to calculate the number of enterprises having received services from IGs has been updated since last year, significantly raising data reliability. Previously, all results obtained through IGs were cumulative and divided by four, since we were in the fourth year of data collection.

In 2011-12, the method used allows for the annualization of the cumulative data obtained on the basis of the actual project start date for each IG and the date of the latest follow-up conducted on the IG. This eliminates duplication, ensuring that a given enterprise is not counted twice by the same IG.

Finally, the Agency has developed a new performance measurement strategy geared to the Agency’s new Program Activity Architecture and its new program which came into effect in 2012. The strategy for data collection with respect to IGs will in particular be revised as part of this exercise, with a view to yet further improving the availability and reliability of the Agency’s performance data.

In this report, performance data are generally comprehensive and very reliable, particularly with respect to projects involving direct assistance to enterprises. Appendix 1, Technical Notes on Performance Data, provides detailed information on the reliability of the data presented in this report.

b. Extent to Which Results Can Be Attributed

The Agency works closely with several departments and agencies of the Government of Canada and the Quebec government, and with many local and regional stakeholders. This collaboration is reflected in the financial packages put together for projects. That is why the Agency cannot itself take credit or claim responsibility for all the results obtained. It is therefore fair to say that the financial assistance awarded by the Agency for the completion of projects contributes to attainment of the results observed.

Appendix - Technical notes on performance data

The method used to calculate the number of enterprises receiving services from intermediary groups (IGs) was revised since last year, significantly enhancing data reliability. Previously, all results obtained from intermediary groups were cumulative and divided by four, since it was the fourth year that data was being collected. In 2011-12, the method used makes it possible to annualize the cumulative data obtained on the basis of the actual project start date for each IG and the date of the latest follow-up conducted on the IG.

Organizations supported solely for the staging of symposiums were excluded, to avoid inflating the results associated with intermediary groups’ projects.

Summary table of new contribution agreements, projects supported and expenditures by program activity in 2011-12
Program activities Number of new contribution agreements approved in 2011-12 Financial assistance authorized for new contribution agreements approved in 2011-12 Total number of projects supported in 2011-121 Expenditures associated with projects supported in 2011-12
Community Development 210 $103,861,037 456 $119,774,973
Infrastructure 0 $0 89 $15,781,310
Special Intervention Measures 0 $0 0 $0
Enterprise Competitiveness 257 $91,888,412 483 $75,894,309
Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions 39 $37,996,432 89 $40,933,704
Policies, Programs and Initiatives 0 $0 5 $191,518
Total 506 $233,745,881 1,122 $252,575,814
1 These are projects for which an expenditure was made in 2011-12.

Organizational priorities

Make Quebec communities stronger:

Indicator: Number and value of contribution agreements approved in 2011-12
Data: PSA - Local and regional enterprises: 39 - $10.1M1
Initiative - TISQFE: 72 - $34.2M
Source: Management information system

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Local and regional enterprises 39 projects, $10,071,770 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) 72 projects, $34,236,267 Very high

Help SMEs become more competitive:

Indicator: Number and value of contribution agreements approved in 2011-12
Data: 210 - $85.8M2
Source: Management information system

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: PSSA - Value chain management 93 projects, $39,973,535 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: PSSA - Innovation management 43 projects, $9,118,149 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: PSSA - Applied research and Technology services and transfers 20 projects, $18,502,404 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: PSSA - Market development 54 projects, $18,193,212 Very high
  TOTAL: 210 projects, $85,787,300  

Strategic outcome

Leverage effect: The leverage effect compares the matching funding expected for each $1 authorized by the Agency. The following formula is used: Total cost of projects - Assistance authorized / Assistance authorized.

The leverage effect data presented in this report are calculated on the basis of all projects for which an expenditure was made in 2011-12.Note 1 Since project duration and start dates vary, the leverage effect data apply to several years, which may be before, during or after 2011-12. Data are estimated, and the method for establishing total costs is not standardized. These data are therefore presented as a guide only.

Leverage effect of projects with an expenditure in 2011-12
Program activities Total cost Assistance authorized Leverage effect
Community Development $1,226,837,596 $403,744,783 $2.04
Enterprise Competitiveness $925,996,613 $193,172,795 $3.79
Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions $432,968,273 $178,407,291 $1.43
Policies, Programs and Initiatives $434,049 $315,455 $0.38
Total $2,586,236,531 $775,640,324 $2.33

Program activity: Community Development

Performance data appearing in the table

Indicator: Number of communities supported so they can mobilize around development issues
Data: 34
Source: Management information system / PSSA 1111

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Communities supported financially in 2011-12 Communities supported for activities involving local consultation (11), planning (16) or implementation of initiatives aimed at attracting/fostering investment (21).

Since a community may have carried out more than one type of activity, the total by activity is higher than the number of communities supported.
Very high
Communities: Communities are generally regional county municipalities (RCMs) or equivalent areas (e.g., Île-de-Montréal, Longueuil), or sometimes administrative regions when the project is of regional scope.

Indicator: Number of individuals receiving entrepreneurship services
Data: 1,047
Source: IGs’ report / PSSA 1121

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of individuals receiving services from intermediary groups supported financially by the Agency in 2011-12 Annual average of the number of individuals receiving services from the eight intermediary groups supported in 2011-12

Total: 1,047
IG: High

(7 IG/8)

Data missing: 12.5%

Indicator: Number of local and regional enterprises being developed, maintained or established
Data: 1,039 (79 D + 960 IG)
Source: Management information system + IGs’ report / PSSA 1122

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Total of local and regional enterprises receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 D: Enterprises supported to foster their development (47), maintenance (8) or creation (24)

Total: 79
D: Very high
IG: Total of enterprises receiving services from intermediary groups supported financially by the Agency in 2011-12 IG: Annual average of the number of enterprises receiving services from the eight intermediary groups supported in 2011-12

Creation: 550
Maintenance and development: 410
Total: 960
IG: High
(7 IG/8)

Probability of double counting

Data missing: 12.5%

Indicator: Number of tourism products and services being developed, expanded or upgraded
Data: 101
Source: Management information system / PSSA 1131R2

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of tourism development agents receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 for developing or upgrading tourism products or services   Very high

Indicator: Number of tourism products and destinations being commercialized outside Quebec
Data: 74
Source: Management information system / PSSA 1131R3

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of tourism development agents receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 for commercializing the tourism offering   Very high

Indicator: Number of growth-generating tourism projects and community infrastructure projects supported
Data: 13
Source: Management information system / PSSA 1131 R4 + PSSA 1132 R2

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of community facilities and growth-generating tourism projects receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 for infrastructure expenditures
 
Number of growth-generating tourism projects (7) supported in 2011-12 + Number of community facilities (6) supported in 2011-12

Total: 13
Very high
(excludes projects solely involving the completion of plans and studies)

Other data appearing in the text

Indicator: Percentage of enterprises supported maintaining or increasing their sales in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 72% (D only)
Source: D: Promoters’ financial statements / PSSA 1122

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording sales targets between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises maintaining or increasing their sales (145) / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date in 2011 (201)

145 / 201 = 72%
D: Very high

Data missing: 7%

Indicator: Percentage of enterprises supported maintaining or increasing their sales or self-generated revenues in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 81% (D only)
Source: D: Promoters’ financial statements / PSSA 1131 R2, R4

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording sales or self-generated revenue targets between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises maintaining or increasing their sales (38) / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date in 2011 (47)

38 / 47 = 81%
D: Very high

Data missing:
10%

Indicator: Percentage of enterprises supported maintaining or increasing the number of tourists from outside Quebec in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 82% (D only)
Source: D: Promoters’ report / PSSA 1131 R2, R3, R4

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording targets for the number of tourists from outside Quebec between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises maintaining or increasing the number of tourists from outside Quebec (63) / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date in 2011 (77)

63 / 77 = 82%
D: Acceptable

Data missing:
27%

Indicator: Number of enterprise connections performed through broadband projects
Data: 728
Source: Promoters’ report / PSSA 1132 R2

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of enterprise connections performed through broadband projects Number of enterprises connected (728) since 2007 through the six (6) projects funded by the Agency ($13,171,629) Acceptable

Indicator: Number of projects supported and value of expenditures in 2011-12
Data: TISQFE: 64 projects, $20.1M
EDI: 20 projects, $2.1M
Cruises: 27 projects, $9.6M
SDS: 36 projects, $15.8M
Source: Management information system - different initiatives - Community Development

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) 64 projects, $20,103,202 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 20 projects, $2,102,422 Very high
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers (Cruises) 27 projects, $9,642,704 Very high
D: Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) 36 projects, $15,773,026 Very high

Community Futures Program

Indicators:

Data:

Source: CFDCs’ report

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Value of investment in startup enterprises $83,506,913 High

Data missing: 3%
Number of enterprises created
Number of jobs created in the enterprises created
192 enterprises created,
646 jobs created
High

Data missing:
2%
Number of expanding enterprises
Number of jobs created and maintained in expanding enterprises
435 expanding enterprises, 4,821 jobs created and maintained High

Data missing:
2%
Number of enterprises (in acquisition, recovery, expansion or modernization) receiving accompaniment services 1,242 enterprises1 High

Data missing:
2%
1 This indicator is not compiled by the 10 Business Development Centres (CAEs).

Program activity: Enterprise Competitiveness

Performance data appearing in the table

Indicator: Number of enterprises involved in an approach to strategic management, market development or value chain management
Data: 4,280 (268 D + 4,012 IG)
Source: Management information system and IGs’ report / PSSA 2112, 2113, 2115

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Total of enterprises with innovation potential receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 D: Enterprises supported to carry out activities in strategic management (1), market development (85) and value chain management (182)

Total : 268
D: Very high
IG: Total of enterprises with innovation potential receiving services from intermediary groups supported financially by the Agency in 2011-12 IG: Annual average of the number of enterprises receiving services from the 30 intermediary groups supported in 2011-12

Strategic management:
669

Market development:
2,390

Value chain management:
953

Total: 4,012
IG: Acceptable
(29 IG/30)

Probability of double counting

Data missing: 3%

Indicator: Number of innovative enterprises involved in an innovation management approach
Data: 679 (95 D + 584 IG)
Source: Management information system and IGs’ report / PSSA 2114

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Total of innovative enterprises receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 D: Enterprises supported to carry out innovation management activities

Total: 95
D: Very high
IG: Total of enterprises with innovation potential receiving services from intermediary groups supported financially by the Agency in 2011-12 IG: Annual average of the number of enterprises receiving services from the eight intermediary groups supported in 2011-12

Total: 584
IG: Acceptable
(7 IG/8)

Probability of double counting

Data missing: 12.5%

Indicator: Number of innovative enterprises in startup or pre-startup phase
Data: 153 (51 D +102 IG)
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2121

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Total of highly innovative enterprises receiving financial assistance in 2011-12 in order to carry out their pre-startup and startup activities D: Enterprises supported to carry out their pre-startup and startup activities

Total: 51
D: Very high
IG: Total of highly innovative enterprises receiving services from intermediary groups supported financially by the Agency in 2011-12 IG: Annual average of the number of enterprises receiving services from the eight intermediary groups supported in 2011-12

Total: 102
IG: Very high

(8 IG/8)

Data missing: 0%

Other data appearing in the DPR

Indicator: Percentage of developing enterprises supported increasing their sales in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 51%
Source: D: Promoters’ financial statements / PSSA 2112, 2113, 2114, 2115

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording sales targets between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises (164) increasing or maintaining their sales / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date between 2007 and 2011 (324)

(164 / 324) * 100 = 51%
D: High

Data missing:

14%

Indicator: Percentage of developing enterprises supported increasing their total international sales in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 42%
Source: D: Promoters’ report / PSSA 2112, 2113, 2114, 2115

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording international sales targets between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises (105) increasing their international sales / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date between 2007 and 2011 (249)

(105 / 249) * 100 = 42%
D: Acceptable

Data missing:
27%

Indicator: Percentage of developing enterprises supported increasing their gross profit margin in the two years following completion of the project
Data: 52%
Source: D: Promoters’ financial statements / PSSA 2115

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Date scheduled in the agreement for recording gross profit margin targets between 2007 and 2011 Number of enterprises (69) increasing their gross profit margin / Number of enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date between 2007 and 2011 (132)

(69 / 132) * 100 = 52%

2007-2009: (16 / 38) * 100 = 42%
2010: (34 / 62) * 100 = 55%
2011: (19 / 32) * 100 = 59%
D: High

Data missing: 21%

Indicator: Percentage of innovative enterprises supported that are still in operation two years following completion of the project
Data: 73%
Source: D: Management information system / PSSA 2121

Baseline Treatment Reliability
D: Total of enterprises supported that are still in operation two years following completion of the project Number of innovative enterprises still in operation (30) / Number of innovative enterprises meeting the scheduled target observation date between 2007 and 2011 (41)

(30 / 41) * 100 = 73%
D: High

Indicator: Number of projects supported and value of expenditures in 2011-12
Data: TISQFE: 70 projects, $9.2M
SDS: 65 projects, $14.3M
Source: Management information system - different initiatives - Enterprise Competitiveness

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) 70 projects, $9,222,946 Very high
D: Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (SDS) D: 65 projects, $14,294,540 Very high

Program activity: Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions

Performance data appearing in the table

Indicator: Number of clusters and networks in development
Data: 17
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2211

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of network- or cluster-type organizations receiving financial assistance in 2011-12. 17 organizations, $1,647,744 Very high

Indicator: Number of institutions supported to carry out technology transfer in conjunction with enterprises
Data: 28
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2213

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of institutions supported receiving financial assistance in 2011-12.   Very high

Other data appearing in the text

Indicator: Number of applied research projects carried out and technologies developed
Data: 1,370
Source: IGs’ report / PSSA 2212, 2213

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of research projects carried out by institutions, clusters and networks having an expenditure between 2007 and 2012   High

Indicator: Number of international promotion organizations supported
Data: 2
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2221, 2222

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of international promotion organizations receiving financial support in 2011-12.   Very high

Indicator: Number of foreign enterprises established or maintained in Quebec
Data: 116
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2221

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of projects having an expenditure between 2007 and 2012 Result last year: 88 + 28 (2011-12) Acceptable

Indicator: Number of international organizations (IOs) supported
Data: 17
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2222

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of projects having an expenditure between 2007 and 2012 Total of projects

Montréal International (MI) treatment: Number of IOs subject to a G&C project + number of IOs supported by MI under the comprehensive agreement
Very high

Indicator: Number of IOs still established in Montréal
Data: 15
Source: Management information system / PSSA 2222

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Total of projects having an expenditure between 2007 and 2012 Total of projects

MI treatment: Number of IOs subject to a G&C project + number of IOs supported by MI under the comprehensive agreement
Very high

Indicator: Number of projects supported and value of expenditures in 2011-12
Data: TISQFE: 12 projects, $2.2M
Source: Management information system - Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions

Baseline Treatment Reliability
Number of projects supported and value of expenditures: Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) 12 projects, $2,184,881 Very high
1 The leverage effect excludes funding associated with CEAP and the Infrastructure program activity.

Table: Greening Government Operations

Additional tables on greening of government operations (GGO) are intended for departments and agencies which undertake to comply with the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the Policy on Green Procurement and the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec contributes to the attainment of five greening of government operations goals from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

Note that information presented in Reports on Plans and Priorities concerns planned results, whereas information presented in Departmental Performance Reports concerns actual results.

Surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) goal

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Achieved
Existence of an implementation plan for disposal of all electronic and electrical equipment generated by the Agency during the 2010-11 baseline year Yes, Commodity Management Framework Yes, Commodity Management Framework
  Targets Results
Percentage of total number of departmental locations whose electronic and electrical equipment plan has been fully implemented at the end of the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 100% 100%
FY 2012-13 100%  
FY 2013-14 100%  

Strategies/comments

  1. The Agency’s Commodity Management Framework covers the life cycle of assets, in particular electronic and electrical equipment. All possible disposal methods are covered in the Framework.
  2. The Agency uses Industry Canada’s Computers for Schools Program and PWGSC’s services for disposal of Crown assets to re-use surplus electronic equipment, and uses departmental individual standing offers for e-waste recycling.
  3. In 2011-12, the Agency had 16 locations (offices) across Quebec, and disposal of assets and equipment was centralized at the Records, Technology and Administration Management Directorate.
  4. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2011-12, the plan for disposal of all electronic and electrical equipment was fully implemented in all Agency locations.

Printing unit reduction goal

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Progressing well*
Proportion of Agency office employees per printing unit for the 2010-11 baseline year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow 3 : 1 3 : 1
  Targets Results
Proportion of Agency office employees per printing unit at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow FY 2011-12 N/A 3 : 1
FY 2012-13 N/A  
FY 2013-14 8 : 1  

Strategies/comments

  1. Scope: The Agency targets all buildings and premises in order to achieve the targeted goal, although some buildings may have a smaller proportion owing to the building occupancy level or security considerations.
  2. Method used to determine the number of office employees: Population Affiliation ReportNote 1 from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).
  3. Definition of printing units: Network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  4. Method used to determine the number of printing units: The Records, Technology and Administration Management Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  5. * Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Renewal of printers is carried out in bulk every three years. The latest renewal took place in March 2010, and the next is planned for 2012-13. In view of the equipment life cycle, it would not be desirable or economical to establish a reduction target prior to the next renewal, so the target of eight employees per printer was established for the RPP 2013-14. The Agency is thus progressing well toward achieving its target in 2013-14.
  6. The Records, Technology and Administration Management Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  7. All Agency sectors are responsible for compliance with and attainment of the target.
  8. A communications strategy will be drawn up in order to raise Agency employees’ awareness.

Paper consumption goal

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and applicable scope.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Progressing well
Number of sheets of office paper purchased per employee during the 2009-10 baseline year. 5,060Note 2 5,060
  TargetsNote 3 Results
Cumulative reduction in paper consumption, as a percentage, compared with the chosen baseline year FY 2011-12 6% 0%
FY 2012-13 12%  
FY 2013-14 20%  

Strategies/comments

  1. Roles and responsibilities: Purchasing of paper is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the target lies with all Agency sectors. The Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  2. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices. The baseline year is 2009-10. The data concern only white letter- and legal-sized paper.
  3. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Since 2009-10, the number of sheets of office paper purchased per employee has remained stable. But the implementation of the new departmental sustainable development strategy and the different document management initiatives under way will have the effect of reducing paper consumption at the Agency. Thus, the Agency is progressing well toward its goal of reducing paper consumption by 20% by March 31, 2014.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Agency’s Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Governmental Affairs Branch. Data for head office are centralized at the Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at its Head Office. It will be broadening this application to all its offices. The paper used at the Agency is manufactured in Quebec.
  6. The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) now organizes technology-assisted paperless meetings.
  7. A communications strategy will be developed in order to encourage employees to reduce paper consumption.

Green meetings goal

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Attention required
  Target Result
Adoption of a Guide for Green Meetings Planned for 2011-12 Planned for 2012

Strategies/comments

  1. Scope of the Guide for Green Meetings: All departmental or interdepartmental meetings held in Agency offices.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Work concerning the guide was discussed at the Agency’s Departmental Management Committee (DMC) in 2011-12. The Agency thus put tools in place and published an iPad User Reference Guide and a Telepresence User Guide, components preliminary to the Guide for Green Meetings. This latter guide will be adopted by the DMC during 2012. But the Agency is already taking several steps to hold green meetings, and a large number of meetings are already being held on that basis. For instance, the DMC is now organizing paperless meetings, backed by appropriate technology, as well as limiting travel. The Operations Sector also regularly uses telepresence with the business offices, thus keeping down the amount of travel.
  3. The challenge will be to monitor application of the guide and conduct reporting.
  4. Role and responsibility: All sectors/directorates are responsible for attainment of the target.
  5. A communications strategy will have to be drawn up to make the means and tools in place for holding green meetings better known.

Green procurement goals

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMARTNote 4 green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

As of April 1, 2011, 95% of computer purchases will be based on an environmentally preferable model.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Achieved
Ratio of purchases of computers which attain the goal to the total volume of computers purchased during the year in question N/A  
  Targets Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 95% 95%
FY 2012-13 95%  
FY 2013-14 95%  

Strategies/comments

  1. According to the Agency’s Technology Master Plan, renewal of all desktop computers takes place every three years, in a single purchase. The most recent renewal was carried out in 2011-12. The Agency combined its order with an order for computers from National Defence, thus realizing savings in view of the volume purchased. Additional needs arise regularly, however, and ad-hoc purchases are made.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2011-12, 95% of computer purchases were based on an environmentally preferable model.
  3. The Agency’s Records, Technology and Administration Management Directorate is responsible for replacing desktop computers and reporting thereon.
  4. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases Energy Star-certified products. This practice helps reduce energy consumption.
  5. In accordance with the Commodity Management Framework, the purchase of computer hardware is managed according to the principles of life cycle management, which involves the following four stages: planning and acquisition, operations, maintenance and disposal.
  6. In accordance with the Commodity Management Framework, the Agency optimizes the productivity and use of IT assets throughout their life cycle.

By March 31, 2014, 95% of new printers purchased will offer one or more environmental performance factors.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Progressing well
Proportion of printers purchased presenting environmental performance factors. In 2011-12, of the 215 printers at the Agency, 180 are Energy Star-certified and were purchased since 2007. 84% 84%
  Targets Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 No target was set 84%
FY 2012-13 95%  
FY 2013-14 95%  

Strategies/comments

  1. Scope: Printing units are defined as network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  2. The Agency’s Records, Technology and Administration Management Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  3. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: Printers are renewed in bulk every three years. Renewal was last carried out in March 2010, and the next is scheduled for late 2012-13. That is why no goal was set for the RPP 2011-12. But the result obtained in 2011-12 shows that the Agency is progressing well toward attaining the goal.
  4. Environmental performance factors will be identified for the selection of printers at the next renewal.
  5. The Agency’s Technology Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  6. More than 60% of photocopiers have print and fax functions, thus minimizing the number of units.
  7. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases Energy Star-certified equipment.

By March 31, 2014, 90% of copy paper purchased will contain at least 30% recycled material.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Surpassed
Percentage of paper purchased containing at least 30% recycled material compared with the total volume of paper purchased during the 2009-10 baseline year 100%Note 5 100%
  TargetsNote 6 Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 50% 100%
FY 2012-13 100%  
FY 2013-14 100%  

Strategies/comments

  1. Scope: Paper is defined as 8.5 x 11, 8.5 x 14 and 11 x 17 paper.
  2. Roles and responsibilities: Purchasing of paper is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the target lies with all Agency sectors. The Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will handle monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  3. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Agency’s Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Governmental Affairs Branch. Data for Head Office are centralized at the Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2011-12, 100% of copy paper purchased at the Agency contained at least 30% recycled material. The Agency is already surpassing its overall goal of purchasing 90% recycled paper by March 31, 2014.
  6. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at its Head Office. It will be broadening this application to all its offices (use of 30% recycled paper, purchased via mandatory standing offer).
  7. A communications strategy will be developed in order to encourage employees to reduce paper consumption.

8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.

From April 1, 2011, 100% of employees (manager, procurement officer and assistant) in the Procurement sector of the Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will receive training on green procurement through Course C215 of the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS).
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Achieved
Proportion of Procurement sector employees having taken CSPS Course C215 during the 2010-11 baseline year 67% 67%
    Targets Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year. FY 2011-12 100% 100%
FY 2012-13 100%  
FY 2013-14 100%  

Strategies/comments

  1. Training used: CSPS Course C215 on green procurement only.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2011-12, 100% of Procurement sector employees had taken the training on green procurement, so the goal has been met. Over the next two years, this proportion will have to be maintained.
  3. Reporting requirements: Annual data collection from employees and the CSPS.
  4. Roles and responsibilities: The Agency’s Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring of and reporting on green procurement training.

As of April 1, 2011, environmental considerations must be integrated into the performance evaluations of all the Agency’s Procurement sector employees.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Achieved
Percentage of the Agency’s Procurement sector employees having in their performance agreements an environmental consideration goal for procurement, for the 2010-11 baseline year. 0% 0%
    Targets Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 100% 100%
FY 2012-13 100%  
FY 2013-14 100%  

Strategies/comments

  1. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: The performance appraisals of all employees in the Procurement sector of the Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate include environmental considerations.


By March 31, 2013, management processes and controls for procurement will ensure that environmental performance considerations are integrated in the procurement process.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal Progressing well
Number of processes revised in order to integrate environmental performance considerations, for the 2010-11 baseline year. (Number of processes to be revised: 4) 0 0
  Targets Results
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year FY 2011-12 2 3
FY 2012-13 4  

Strategies/comments

  1. Scope: Currently, the four procurement processes are: the Commodity Management Framework, ISO procedure on procurement, request for proposals for drawing up a contract, and procedure for consulting and professional services.
  2. Justification for choice of traffic light indicator: In 2011-12, the Agency revised three of its four processes in order to integrate environmental performance considerations. By 2012-13, all processes will be revised in order to integrate best practices and improve existing practices.
  3. Particular attention will be paid to action to be taken in order to comply with reporting requirements.

Table: User Fees Reporting

User fees: Fees may be charged under the Access to Information Act. Where applicable, other fees may also be charged for reproduction, alternative format, research, preparation, production and programming.

Fee type: Other products and services

Fee-setting authority: Access to Information Act and Regulations

Date last modified: 2012

Performance standards: The person responsible in the organization is required to convey in whole or in part the documents requested, within 30 days following receipt of the access to information request. Pursuant to section 9 of the Act, the response time may be extended; notice of extension must then be sent. Further information on the Access to Information Act can be found on the Department of Justice site.

Performance results: Processing times varied considerably in 2011-12, with the percentage of requests processed within 30 days standing at 52%. This situation was primarily attributable to the nature of the documents requested, which required consultation in 59% of the cases.

Table of user fees and regulatory charges for 2011-12 and forecasts for 2012-13 through 2014-15 (in thousands of dollars)
2011-12 Planning years
Planned revenue Actual revenue Full cost Fiscal year Planned revenue Estimated full cost
0.1 0.179 149 2012-13 0.150 137
2013-14 0.150 142
2014-15 0.150 143

Other information: The Agency follows Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines with regard to imposing and waiving access fees. For example, it waives the collection of fees of less than $25. For amounts exceeding $25, the Agency decides whether to collect fees in whole or in part, based on an assessment of public interest.

Table: Details on Transfer Payment Programs (TTPs)

Name of transfer payment program: Community Diversification. This program represents a voted item, except for 2009-10 and 2010-11, for which the funding portion dedicated to Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP) corresponds to a statutory appropriation.

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: The Community Diversification program helped Quebec regions maintain and develop their economic activity base. A community’s vitality depends on its ability to develop by building on its own assets. This program had three objectives: to foster communities’ development and increase their mobilization by drawing up visions and projects of local and regional scope; to assist communities through support for entrepreneurship and through creation or maintenance of viable enterprises; and to increase communities’ capability to attract tourists and skilled individuals.

This program also led to implementation of the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF), a temporary CEAP initiative (2009-10 and 2010-11), and of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE), the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) and the Support Initiative for International Cruise Development Along the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers.

Eligible beneficiaries were primarily small and medium-sized enterprises and non-profit organizations.

Strategic outcome: A Competitive, Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

Results achieved:

Table of G&C expenditures for the Community Diversification program by program activity between 2009-10 and 2011-12 (in millions of dollars)
Spending by program activity Actual expenditures
2009-10
Actual expenditures
2010-11
Planned spending
2011-12
Total authoritiesNote 1
2011-12
Actual expenditures
2011-12
Variance
Program activity: Community Development
Total Grants --- --- 0.1 --- --- ---
Total Contributions 86.7 82.3 110.5 98.0 91.2 (19.2)
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Program activity: Special Intervention Measures
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 78.0 86.0 --- --- --- ---
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Program Activities 164.7 168.3 110.6 98.0 91.2 (19.2)

Comments on variance: The variance is primarily attributable to implementation of the 2010 Strategic Review aimed at reducing the grants and contributions budget and reallocating resources available in-house, on the one hand, to bring forward funding for construction of a gas pipeline between Vallée-Jonction and Thetford Mines and, on the other hand, to support large-scale projects under the Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions program activity.

Audit conducted or scheduled: N/A

Evaluation performed or planned: The summative evaluation of the Community Diversification program was completed in 2011-12. The report is available at: the Agency website.


Name of transfer payment program: Community Futures Program (CFP). This program represents a voted item.

Start date: May 18, 1995

End date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada’s Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Description: This Canada-wide program provides support for communities in all parts of the country to help them take charge of their own local economic development. In Quebec, the CFP financially supports local and regional development agencies, including Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs).

Strategic outcome: A Competitive, Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

Results achieved:

Table of G&C expenditures for the Community Futures Program by program activity between 2009-10 and 2011-12 (in millions of dollars)
Spending by program activity Actual expenditures
2009-10
Actual expenditures
2010-11
Planned spending
2011-12
Total authoritiesNote 2
2011-12
Actual expenditures
2011-12
Variance
Program activity: Community Development
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 42.6 44.0 32.3 32.3 28.5 (3.8)
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Program Activity 42.6 44.0 32.3 32.3 28.5 (3.8)

Comments on variance: The variance is attributable in part to the reduced budget following the renewal of agreements with CFDCs. Thus, from 2011-12, the Agency’s offering amounts to $29M for the CFP.

Audit conducted or scheduled: N/A

Evaluation performed or planned: N/A


Name of transfer payment program: Recreational Infrastructure Canada (RInC)

Start date: April 1, 2009

End date: October 31, 2011

Description: RInC was a Canada-wide initiative intended to be a targeted, short-term measure to stimulate the Canadian economy. Its aim was to help reduce the impact of the recent economic downturn by increasing the total value of construction activities associated with recreational infrastructure. RInC-funded projects primarily involved modernizing, repairing, replacing or expanding existing recreational infrastructure, such as swimming pools, arenas and playing fields. In Quebec, the program was implemented in partnership with the Quebec government.

Strategic outcome: A Competitive, Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

Results achieved:

Table of G&C expenditures for the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program by program activity between 2009-10 and 2011-12 (in millions of dollars)
Spending by program activity Actual expenditures
2009-10
Actual expenditures
2010-11
Planned spending
2011-12
Total authoritiesNote 3
2011-12
Actual expenditures
2011-12
Variance
Program activity: Infrastructure
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 1.4 60.2 0 16.5 12.8 12.8
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Program Activity 1.4 60.2 0 16.5 12.8 12.8

Comments on variance: The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures is attributable to the reprofiling of funding from 2010-11 to 2011-12. The amount of funding reprofiled was not yet known when the Agency’s RPP 2011-12 was drafted.

Audit conducted or scheduled: An internal audit of project analyses under the CAF and RInC was completed in 2010-11. An internal audit on co-ordination of the delivery of financial assistance under the CAF and RInC ended in 2010-11, too. Finally, the Agency also completed in 2011-12 a follow-up review of agreements under the CAF and RInC. The reports are available at: the Agency website.

Evaluation performed or planned: N/A


Name of transfer payment program: Business and Regional Growth

Start date: April 1, 2007

End date: March 31, 2012

Description: This program reinforced conditions conducive to the sustainable growth of regions and SMEs, and had three objectives:

This program was also used for implementation of the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF), a temporary Canada’s Economic Action Plan initiative (2009-10 and 2010-11), and of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies (TISQFE) and the Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI).

Eligible beneficiaries were primarily small and medium-sized enterprises and non-profit organizations.

Strategic outcome: A Competitive, Diversified Economy for the Regions of Quebec

Results achieved:

Table of G&C expenditures for the Business and Regional Growth program by program activity between 2009-10 and 2011-12 (in millions of dollars)
Spending by program activity Actual expenditures
2009-10
Actual expenditures
2010-11
Planned spending
2011-12
Total authoritiesNote 4
2011-12
Actual expenditures
2011-12
Variance
Program activity: Enterprise Competitiveness
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 60.7 79.7 82.2 75.9 75.9 (6.3)
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Program activity: Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 34.1 36.2 21.5 40.9 40.9 19.4
Total Other types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Program activity: Special Intervention Measures
Total Grants --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Contributions 17.8 18.1 --- --- --- ---
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments --- --- --- --- --- ---
Total Program Activities 112.6 134.0 103.7 116.8 116.8 13.1

Comments on variance: The variance is largely attributable to the allocation of contributions for projects that were not planned when the Agency’s RPP 2011-12 was drafted.

Audit conducted or scheduled: N/A

Evaluation performed or planned: The summative evaluation of the Business and Regional Growth program was completed in 2011-12. The report is available at: the Agency website.

Table: Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

Response to the Auditor General of Canada, including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

2011 Fall Report of the Auditor General of Canada, Chapter 1 - Canada’s Economic Action Plan

The objective of this audit was to determine whether selected federal entities monitored the progress of projects and federal spending on programs, and provided Parliament with information on progress made and actual expenditures. The Community Adjustment Fund initiative, delivered by the regional development agencies, was included in this audit. One recommendation was made to the regional development agencies.

The complete report from the Office of the Auditor General may be consulted at: the OAG website.

External audits (N.B.: These refer to other external audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada and the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages)

Public Service Commission Audit Reports 2011, 6 - Audit of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Agency had established an appropriate framework, practices and systems for managing its appointment activities, then to determine whether appointments and the appointment process complied with the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA), the Public Service Employment Regulations (PSER), the Public Service Commission (PSC) Appointment Framework and other governing authorities.

The complete audit report from the Public Service Commission may be consulted at: the PSC website.

Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue

Non-respendable revenue (in thousands of dollars)
Program activity Actual revenue
2009-10
Actual revenue
2010-11
2011-12
Planned revenue Actual revenue
Community Development
Repayable contributions 8,030 6,921 6,000 10,680
All other revenueNote 1 305 529 --- 216
Infrastructure
Repayable contributions --- --- --- 16
All other revenue --- 11 --- 3,630
Special Intervention Measures
Repayable contributions --- 478 --- 3,407
All other revenue --- 166 --- 625
Enterprise Competitiveness
Repayable contributions 36,010 35,846 33,000 31,525
All other revenue 1,109 1,030 --- 1,068
Competitive Positioning of Sectors and Regions
Repayable contributions 4,045 1,818 1,000 569
All other revenue 858 34 --- 90
Policies, Programs and Initiatives
Repayable contributions --- 52 --- ---
All other revenue --- --- --- 15
Internal Services
Repayable contributions 11 --- --- ---
All other revenue 40 21 --- 37
Total non-disposable revenue
  50,408 46,906 40,000 51,878

Back to note 1 All other revenue includes refunds of prior year expenditures, adjustments to prior year accruals, service fees, proceeds from disposal of Crown assets, interest revenues and other miscellaneous revenues.

Table: Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal audits 2011-12
Name of internal audit Type of audit Status Completion date
Audit of the integrity of information in the Hermès Finances system Control mechanisms Completed (audit plan 2010-11) July 2011
Review of the monitoring of agreements under the Community Adjustment Fund and the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program Control mechanisms Completed (added to audit plan 2011-12) August 2011
Annual audit of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund Control mechanisms Completed March 2012
All the audit reports listed above may be consulted at
the Agency Website
Continuous audit application: grants and contributions payables at year end Control mechanisms Completed (added to audit plan 2011-12) August 2011
Audit of the Agency’s collection and recovery activities Control mechanisms Completed December 2011
Review of management of business offices’ development activities Control mechanisms Completed (added to audit plan 2011-12) December 2011
Review of conflict of interest management Management mechanisms Completed (added to audit plan 2011-12) March 2012
Follow-up on action plans from earlier audits Control mechanisms Completed March 2012
Audit of integrated planning Management mechanism Cancelled N/A
Study on level of preparedness for certification of financial statements Financial management control Deferred N/A
Annual audit of the Infrastructure Canada Program Management mechanism Cancelled N/A
Audit of the Technology Management Framework Management mechanisms Deferred N/A
Audit of liaison and representation activities with Central Agencies and other departments Management mechanisms Cancelled N/A
Audit of management of information available to Agency staff and communications Management mechanisms Deferred N/A
Audit of management of information available to the public and communications Management mechanisms Deferred N/A

Evaluations 2011-12
Name of evaluation Program activity Type of evaluation Status Completion date
Evaluation of the Community Diversification grants and contributions program Community development Summative evaluation Completed 2011-12
Evaluation of the Business and Regional Growth grants and contributions program Enterprise competitiveness

Competitive positioning of sectors and regions
Summative evaluation Completed 2011-12
Evaluation of the Support Initiative for International Cruise Development on the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers
 
Community development Formative evaluation Completed 2011-12
Evaluation of the Economic Development Initiative component of the Road-map for Canada’s Linguistic Duality Community development Evaluation In progress with Industry Canada and Canadian Heritage 2012-13
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