Report on the administration of the Access to Information Act 2016-2017

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

ISSN number : 2291-7209

Publish date : September 26, 2017

Summary :

This report deals with the activities of the Agency in implementing the Access to information Act for the fiscal year 2016-2017

Table of Contents

  1. 1. Introduction
  2. 2. Organizational structure
  3. 3. Delegation order
  4. 4. Highlighs of the statistical report 2016-17
  5. 5. Training
  6. 6. Policies, guidelines, procedures and initiatives
  7. 7. Summary of key issues and actions taken on complaints or audits
  8. 8. Monitoring compliance
  9. Appendix - Delegation Chart - Access to Information Act and Access to Information Regulations
  10. Appendix - Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

1. Introduction

Summary of the purpose of The Access to Information Act

The Access to Information Act (the Act), promulgated on July 1, 1983, aims to broaden access to the records of the federal government. It enshrines the principle of the right of the public to be given information and endeavours to complement arrangements for access to records.

In deference to this legal principle, federal institutions are required to establish standardized practices and procedures for processing access to information requests. These practices and procedures must include an undertaking to make all reasonable efforts to assist applicants, regardless of who they may be. Institutions must also apply the Act in an effective, coordinated and proactive manner so as to provide full, accurate and timely responses to access to information requests, subject only to regulatory constraints.

The Access to Information Act allows Canadians, permanent residents and anyone in Canada to exercise a general right of access to information held by federal institutions, subject to specific and limited exceptions.

Annual report prepared in accordance with section 72

This document was prepared in response to section 72 of the Act, which requires federal institutions to submit an annual report to Parliament on administration of the Act. This report provides details on activities related to administration of the Act at Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED).

Mandate of the Institution

Under its constituent Act, CED’s mission is to “promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.”

As part of its mission, CED promotes the start-up and performance of businesses. It helps them become more innovative, productive and competitive. It supports communities’ engagement efforts in Quebec’s regions and helps to attract investment that will increase the prosperity of the Quebec and Canadian economies.

CED contributes to the economic vitality of all Quebec regions, by building on their competitive regional advantages. It makes investments that support transition and diversification for those communities that remain dependent on one sector for economic opportunities or that have experienced economic shocks.

CED also pays special attention to communities with low economic growth. In this respect, CED uses an Economic Development Index allows it, among other things, to determine the economic development levels of Quebec’s 104 communities in order to meet their needs more specifically.

Through its business offices, present in the regions of Quebec, CED works directly and indirectly with businesses, primarily small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and through non-profit organizations (NPOs) that support them and the communities. By providing financial assistance for projects, among other things, CED supports their development efforts.

CED’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development. It is:

CED’s Grants and Contributions Programs and Initiatives, in effect in 2016–17

Main program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP)

  • Targeted and/or temporary initiatives:
    • Economic Recovery Initiative for Lac-Mégantic
    • Canadian Initiative for the Economic Diversification of Communities Reliant on Chrysotile
    • Strategic Initiative to Combat the Spruce Budworm Outbreak in Quebec
    • Extension of the natural gas distribution network between Lévis and Sainte-Claire (Bellechasse Pipeline)
    • Linguistic Duality Economic Development Initiative (EDI) (Canada-wide initiative)
    • Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP-150) (Canada-wide initiative)

Canada-wide program implemented in Quebec by CED:

  • Community Futures Program (CFP)

Infrastructure Canada’s delivery partner in Quebec:

  • Building Canada Fund–Quebec (BCF)

The CED’s main grants and contributions program, the QEDP, came into effect on April 1, 2012. The main recipients of the program are SMEs, business groups or associations and NPOs whose principal mission is to support businesses or economic development. The QEDP includes repayable and non-repayable contributions.

To learn more about the Agency’s mandate, programming and operations, go to its Web site: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions.

2. Organizational structure

Access to information and privacy office

CED fulfills its Access to Information Act (ATI) and Privacy Act (PA) responsibilities with an Access to Information and Privacy Office (AIPO) to process requests. The AIPO reports directly to the Deputy Minister / President’s Chief of Staff.

AIPO has an access to information and privacy coordinator, as well as an advisor and a coordinating agent. The coordinator, with the help of the advisor and agent, oversees compliance with legislation, regulations, procedures and broad government trends.

Through its delegated authority, AIPO represents the Agency on matters relating to the Act in dealings with the public, Treasury Board Secretariat, the Commissioners of Information and Privacy and other federal departments and institutions.

AIPO’s chief duties are:

3. Delegation order

DEC’s enabling legislation identifies its head as being the Deputy Minister / President. In addition to managing the institution and overseeing management of its personnel, the Deputy Minister / President is responsible for application of the Access to Information Act (AIA).

To this end, the authority for application of the Act was delegated to the Coordinator, Access to Information and Privacy, while most administrative authority was delegated to the Advisor, Access to Information and Parliamentary Affairs.

A copy of the signed and dated delegation order is attached to this report.

4. Highlighs of the statistical report 2016-17

2016-17 Review

  • CED received a total of 41 requests in 2016-2017, an increase of more than 240% compared with last year where 12 requests were received. the aipo responded to each of these requests in 2016-2017, not having to carry any over to the next fiscal year.
  • CED responded to 75% of its requests within 30 days and nearly two thirds (60%) were answered prior to day 15.
  • The sources of applicants in 2016-2017 is brokendown as followed: 37% public, organizations 22%, media 20% and business 15%. applicants from the public accounted for 75% of all requests in 2015-2016.
  • 10 870 pages were reviewed in 2016-2017, an increase of 335% over the previous fiscal year. over 9 300 pages were released during the reporting period.
  • It was the first full year of accepting access to information requests submitted on-line. we saw that 95% of applicants preferred using this method.

Requests received and processed

The number of requests received and processed during the course of 2016-17 increased considerably over the previous year. The number of requests received, which total 41, is close to the averages reported four years ago after declining for three consecutive years. Indeed, the AIPO registered an increase of over 340% from last year, when 12 requests were received. Four requests were carried over into 2016-17 and none was carried over into the next reporting period. As a result, all 45 requests processed in 2016-17 were closed during the reporting period.

It was the first full year of accepting access to information requests submitted on-line. We saw that 95% of applicants preferred using this method. However, one downside from this trend is a higher number in requests transferred, as the AIPO transferred four requests to the appropriate institution after applicants mistakenly selected CED from the drop-down menu to submit their requests.

Table 1
Requests received

Number of requests received

Table 1 - Long description

Number of requests received

In 2016-2017, 41 requests were received and 4 other were carried forward from the previous year

In 2015-2016, 12 requests were received and 5 other were carried forward from the previous year

In 2014-2015, 20 requests were received and none was carried forward from the previous year

In 2013-2014, 22 requests were received and 4 others were carried forward from the previous year

In 2012-2013, 48 requests were received and 8 others were carried forward from the previous year

Source of requests

In 2016-17, the AIPO saw a diverse breakdown in the source of applicants. Indeed, 37% of requests came from the public, compared to 75% in 2015-2016. Organizations followed with 22%, media with 20% and the business sector with 15%. Unlike the previous fiscal year where no request was submitted by members from the media, in 2016-17 that group emerged as the third most frequent type of applicant.

Table 2
Source of applicants

Sources 2015-2016

Table 2 - Long description

Requests’ sources

37% public

22% organization

20% media

15% business

7% academia

Subjects of requests

Year after year, the same pattern can be seen in what requesters are seeking. Again this year, applicants submitted requests for documents related to grants and contributions awarded by CED or for documents pertaining to CED’s internal activities.

Of the 27 requests where documents were provided in 2016-17, 78% were aimed at documents related to grants and contributions and 22% pertained to CED’s internal activities. This ratio differs from the previous fiscal period as the breakdown was evenly split between the two.

Disposition and completion times

The Act stipulates that access requests must normally be answered within 30 calendar days. Excluding transferred and abandoned requests, of the 40 requests closed in 2016-17, 30 (75%) were answered in less than 30 days. Of those, 24 requests (60%) were answered prior to day 15.

It is also important to note that the Act provides extensions to the deadlines for requests where consultations are needed with third parties and with other organizations or if the request is for a large number of records. Given the nature of the documents sought from CED in 2016-17, ten requests required such extensions. The AIPO therefore had to extend the deadlines to be able to discharge its obligations under the Act. Of the requests closed during the reporting period, ten requests (25%) were extended and all of the responses were provided within the timeframes as set out in the Act. There was not one late request.

In 2016-17, CED received and processed thirteen requests (32%) where no records existed. Even if no record was provided, the AIPO still had to process the request, engage with the applicant and coordinate the search for records by the office or primary interest.

Table 3
Disposition and completion time
Disposition of Requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 10 4 0 1 0 0 0 15
Disclosed in part 1 2 3 6 0 0 0 12
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
Request transferred 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Request abandoned 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 28 7 3 7 0 0 0 45

Informal Requests

In 2016-17, the number of requests treated informally rose considerably. This trend could be attributed to the Open Government Website where a user is able to request a copy of the records provided in an access to information request. CED processed over twenty such requests.

Exemptions and exclusions invoked

Considering the 27 requests where information was provided, the AIPO fully disclosed the information being sought, without invoking protection, for 15 requests (56%). This percentage is similar to last year. The AIPO invoked exemptions in the 12 remaining requests (45%). Through its operations, CED mainly holds third party information. Therefore, it is the section most commonly invoked when justifying redacted information. Besides the exemptions detailed in the following table, no exclusion was invoked.

Table 4
Exceptions invoked1
Sections Invoked Frequency
Personal information
19 (1)

7
Third party information
20(1) b)
20(1) c)
20(1) d)

6
7
3
Advice and recommendations to government
21(1) a)
21(1) b)
21(1) c)

3
1
3
Solicitor-client privilege
23

3
Information to be published
26

2

1 More than one section may be invoked for a given request.

Format of information released

Fiscal year 2016-17 saw an increase in popularity for disclosing documents in an electronic format, as 74% of respondents preferred this method of disclosure, which is far superior to the 10% in the previous year. This trend may be attributed, in part, to CED accepting on-line requests and promoting the disclosure of large number of records electronically. This year again, as this has been the case for many years, no records were consulted in CED’s reading room.

Pages processed and pages disclosed

The total of pages processed and pages disclosed may vary considerably from year to year, depending on the subjects of interest and the quantity of relevant records held by CED. In 2016-17, the number of pages reviewed rose to 10,870, which is a 335% increase from last year, where 2,499 pages were processed. That number far exceeds the number of pages processed for the last four years. As for the number of pages disclosed, they represent 86% of those processed, which meant 9,934 pages were disclosed to requesters. This is a 10% increase in the pages processed / pages disclosed ratio from last year.

Table 5
Pages processed and disclosed

Pages processed and disclosed

Table 3 - Long description

Pages processed and disclosed

In 2016-2017, 10 870 pages were processed and 9 334 pages were disclosed

In 2015-2016, 2 499 pages were processed and 1 915 pages were disclosed

In 2014-2015, 1 889 pages were processed and 552 pages were disclosed

In 2013-2014, 4 779 pages were processed and 2 414 pages were disclosed

Consultations and extensions

Because of the nature of the CED’s operations, mainly aimed at allocating financial assistance to SMEs and organizations, it is not unusual when processing requests to consult with third parties, which leads to the extension of the time limit as stipulated in the Act. In addition, consultations with other federal institutions are sometimes needed when processing request, thus also requiring time extensions.

In order to meet the demands of the Act, extensions were granted for 10 out of 27 (37%) requests where records were provided, which is lower than the 46% last year. In each case, applicants were advised of the time limit extension in accordance with the Act. Every consultation conducted with third parties and with another federal institution led to an extension ranging from 30 days to 90 days, with 100% of requests answered within the allotted time. Therefore, every request closed during the reporting period was processed within the deadline regardless if an extension was taken or not.

Consultations with Privy Council Office

There was no consultation conducted with the Privy Council Office for fiscal year 2016-17. Indeed, of the information requested, none required a confirmation whether cabinet confidences (section 69 of the Act) were included. This continues the same trend as in 2015-2016.

Consultations received from other institutions

For this current year, the AIPO processed a total of 37 requests from other federal institutions, which is higher than the 28 consultations closed in 2015-2016. These requests account for a total of 228 pages for processing.

Of these 37 consultations, a recommendation for full disclosure was made for 34 requests (92%) and for partial disclosure for two. The other request was transferred to a different institution. Almost all of these requests, being 97%, were processed within 15 days.

Table 6
Consultations received

Consultations received

Table 6 - Long description

Consultation requests received

In 2012-2013, 17 consultations were received

In 2013-2014, 29 consultations were received

In 2014-2015, 18 consultations were received

In 2015-2016, 28 consultations were received

In 2016-2017, 37 consultations were received

Fees collected and waived

The AIPO complies with the guidelines of the Treasury Board Secretariat with regard to access fees collected and waived. In 2016-17, a net amount of $180 was collected in application fees. No other amount was collected for any type of fee. Five requests had their application fees were waived. The AIPO waived these fees to split two requests into six requests as they targeted distinct files. As for the requests that were transferred, their application fees were reported once and only by the institution that initially received the request.

Costs

Even with a considerable increase in the number of requests and consultations processed during the reporting period, the costs of administering the Act remain close to those in 2015 2016. The costs reached $100,742, an increase of close to $1,500 from last year. This included $93,516 in salaries and $7,226 for travel, training, software licensing, supplies and translation.

A copy of the 2016-17 statistical report on the administration of the Access to Information Act is attached to this report.

5. Training

Fiscal year 2015-2016 saw mandatory training sessions on privacy and access to information delivered to all CED employees. This large-scale program, which was led by the AIPO, served as a way to reinforce to 246 CED employees the importance of protecting personal information and adopting good practices.

In 2016-17, no training session was delivered to CED employees, as it is normally offered every other year. However, the AIPO remains available to deliver specific training to employees, whose duties call for a certain grasp of access to information matters.

6. Policies, guidelines, procedures and initiatives

Procedure for the application of the security of canada information sharing act (SCISA)

The SCISA seeks to improve the effectiveness and timeliness of information sharing among Government of Canada institutions for national security purposes, while complying with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Privacy Act. The SCISA does not override existing restrictions on information sharing.

In essence, the SCISA authorizes federal institutions to disclose information, including personal information, to a limited number of institutions whose mandates are linked to national security. The SCISA does not create an obligation to disclose information because the disclosing institution retains the discretion to make that decision.

During the reporting period, a procedure was implemented to guide and facilitate the application of the SCISA at CED. This procedure is available on CED’s Intranet and details explicitly the criteria the AIPO and corporate security must respect in order to disclose information under the SCISA.

Access to information and personal information procedure

No new modification was made to CED’s internal Access to Information and Personal Information procedure during the course of 2016-17. However, already well established since 2011, this procedure enables the AIPO to meet its requirements and ensures that access to information requests are processed in full compliance with the Act’s principles.

7. Summary of key issues and actions taken on complaints or audits

Complaints and investigations

The AIPO did not receive any new complaint over the course of the year. One complaint, received in July 2012, is still under investigation. The main point at issue was interpretation of section 20(1) regarding documents showing contribution amounts claimed by CED clients and paid out. The investigation was nearing an outcome at the end of 2016-17. However, as this report was going to press, the AIPO was waiting for the Office of Information Commissioner of Canada’s findings.

Audits

CED was not the subject of any audit over the reporting period.

8. Monitoring compliance

Monitoring of the Processing Time

The AIPO ensures the time to process access to information requests is monitored through a weekly report of on-going requests. The report provides the details of each request, such as the due date and current status, i.e. documents being retrieved, under review, in consultation or in the approval process. This report is distributed to CED’s senior management, including its Deputy Head.

Since 2011, the AIPO has equipped itself with software to manage and track access to information requests and privacy requests. This program makes it easier to follow every activity and task related to any request and serves as a tool to monitor processing time to comply with the provisions on timeframes as set out in the Act.

Appendix - Delegation Chart - Access to Information Act and Access to Information Regulations

The President, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act, hereby designates the persons holding the positions set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers, duties and functions of the President as the head of the Economic Development Agency for the Regions of Quebec, under the provisions of the Act and related regulations set out in the schedule opposite each position. This designation replaces all previous delegation orders.

Access to Information Act
Provision Description Proposed delegation
Senior advisor, access to information Coordinator, access to information
4(2.1) Responsibility of head of institution
7(a) Notice when access requested
7(b) Giving access to record
8(1) Transfer of request to another institution
9 Extension of time limits
11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6) Additional fees
12(2)(b) Language of access
12(3)(b) Access in alternative format
Exemption Provisions of the Access to Information Act
Provision Description Proposed delegation
Coordinator, Access to information and Privacy Advisor, Access to information
13 Exemption – Information obtained in confidence  
14 Exemption – Federal-provincial affairs  
15 Exemption – International affairs and defence  
16 Exemption – Law enforcement and investigations  
16.5 Exemption – Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act  
17 Exemption – Safety of individuals  
18 Exemption – Economic interests of Canada  
18.1 Exemption – Economic interests of government institutions  
19 Exemption – Personal information  
20 Exemption – Third party information  
21 Exemption – Operations of government  
22 Exemption – Testing procedures, tests and audits  
22.1 Exemption – Audit working papers and draft audit reports  
23 Exemption – Solicitor-client privilege  
24 Exemption – Statutory prohibitions  
Other Provisions of the Access to Information Act
Provision Description Proposed delegation
Coordinator, Access to information and Privacy Advisor, Access to information
25 Severability
26 Exemption – Information to be published  
27(1), (4) Third-party notification
28(1)(b), (2), (4) Third-party notification
29(1) Where the Information Commissioner recommends disclosure
33 Advising Information Commissioner of third-party involvement
35(2)(b) Right to make representations  
37(1)b) Notice of actions to implement recommendations of Commissioner  
37(4) Access to be given to complainant
43(1) Notice to third party (application to Federal Court for review)
44(2) Notice to applicant (application to Federal Court by third party)
52(2), (3) Special rules for hearings  
69 Cabinet confidences*  
71(1) Facilities for inspection of manuals
72 Annual report to Parliament

* Legal advice obtained beforehand

Access to Information Regulations
Provision Description Proposed delegation
Coordinator, Access to information and Privacy Advisor, Access to information
6(1) Transfer of request
7(2) Search and preparation fees
7(3) Production and programming fees
8 Method of access
8.1 Limitations in respect of format

I approve the delegation schedule.

Manon Brassard, Deputy Minister / President
Date

Appendix - Statistical Report on the Access to Information Act

Part 1 – Requests under the Access to Information Act

1.1 Number of Requests
Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 41
Outstanding from previous reporting period 4
Total 45
Closed during reporting period 45
Carried over to next reporting period 0
1.2 Source of requests
Source Number of Requests
Media 8
Academia 3
Business (Private Sector) 6
Organization 9
Public 15
Decline to Identify 0
Total 41
1.3 Informal requests
Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
23 0 0 0 0 0 0 23

Note: All requests previously recorded as "treated informally" will now be accounted for in this section only.

Part 2 – Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More than 365 Days Total
All disclosed 10 4 0 1 0 0 0 15
Disclosed in part 1 2 3 6 0 0 0 12
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13
Request transferred 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Request abandoned 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 28 7 3 7 0 0 0 45
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of Requests
13(1) (a) 0
13(1) (b) 0
13(1) (c) 0
13(1) (d) 0
13(1) (e) 0
14 0
14(a) 0
14(b) 0
15(1) 0
15(1) - I.A.* 0
15(1) - Def.* 0
15(1) - S.A.* 0
16(1) (a) (i) 0
16(1) (a) (ii) 0
16(1) (a) (iii) 0
16(1) (b) 0
16(1) (c) 0
16(1) (d) 0
16(2) 0
16(2) (a) 0
16(2) (b) 0
16(2) (c) 0
16(3) 0
16.1(1) (a) 0
16.1(1) (b) 0
16.1(1) (c) 0
16.1(1) (d) 0
16.2(1) 0
16.3 0
16.4(1) (a) 0
16.4(1) (b) 0
16.5 0
17 0
18(a) 0
18(b) 0
18(c) 0
18(d) 0
18.1(1) (a) 0
18.1(1) (b) 0
18.1(1) (c) 0
18.1(1) (d) 0
19(1) 7
20(1) (a) 0
20(1) (b) 6
20(1) (b.1) 0
20(1) (c) 7
20(1) (d) 3
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1) (a) 3
21(1) (b) 1
21(1) (c) 3
21(1) (d) 0
22 0
22.1(1) 0
23 3
24(1) 0
26 2

* I.A.: International Affairs Def.: Defence of Canada S.A.: Subversive Activities

2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of Requests
68(a) 0
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 0
68.2(a) 0
68.2(b) 0
69(1) 0
69(1) (a) 0
69(1) (b) 0
69(1) (c) 0
69(1) (d) 0
69(1) (e) 0
69(1) (f) 0
69(1) (g) re (a) 0
69(1) (g) re (b) 0
69(1) (g) re (c) 0
69(1) (g) re (d) 0
69(1) (g) re (e) 0
69(1) (g) re (f) 0
69.1(1) 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other Formats
All disclosed 5 10 0
Disclosed in part 2 10 0
Total 7 20 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of Requests Number of Pages Processed Number of Pages Disclosed Number of Requests
All disclosed 1886 1886 15
Disclosed in part 8984 7448 12
All exempted 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 1
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 14 180 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 6 237 3 545 1 554
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 1 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 21 417 3 545 1 554
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests (continued)
Disposition 1001-5000 Pages Processed More Than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
All disclosed 1 1706 0 0
Disclosed in part 1 622 1 5490
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0
Total 2 2328 1 5490
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation Required Assessment of Fees Legal Advice Sought Other Total
All disclosed 4 0 0 0 4
Disclosed in part 10 0 2 0 12
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 14 0 2 0 16

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline Principal Reason
Workload External Consultation Internal Consultation Other
0 0 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of Days Past Deadline Number of Requests Past Deadline Where No Extension Was Taken Number of Requests Past Deadline Where An Extension Was Taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 0 0
16 to 30 days 0 0 0
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 – Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of Requests Where an Extension Was Taken 9(1)(a)
Interference With
Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 0 0 1 1
Disclosed in part 5 0 1 8
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 5 0 2 9
3.2 Length of extensions
Length of Extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference With
Operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 0 0 0 3
31 to 60 days 4 0 2 6
61 to 120 days 1 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 0 0 0
365 days or more 0 0 0 0
Total 5 0 2 9

Part 4 – Fees

Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
Number of Rquests Amount Number of Requests Amount
Application 36 $180 5 $25
Search 0 $0 0 $0
Production 0 $0 0 $0
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 0 $0 0 $0
Altemative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction 0 $0 0 $0
Total 36 $180 5 $25

Part 5 – Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and organizations
Consultations Other Government of Canada Institutions Number of Pages to Review Other Organizations Number of Pages to Review
Received during reporting period 35 225 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 2 3 0 0
Total 37 228 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 37 228 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0
5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 33 1 0 0 0 0 0 34
Disclose in part 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 36 1 0 0 0 0 0 37
5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests
1 to 15 Days 16 to 30 Days 31 to 60 Days 61 to 120 Days 121 to 180 Days 181 to 365 Days More Than 365 Days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 6 – Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

6.1 Requests with Legal Services
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0
6.1 Requests with Legal Services (continued)
Number of Days 1001-5000 Pages Processed More Than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0
6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0
6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office (continued)
Number of Days 1001-5000 Pages Processed More Than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of Requests Pages Disclosed Number of Requests Pages Disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

Part 7 – Complaints and Investigations

Section 32 Section 35 Section 37 Total
0 0 0 0

Part 8 – Court Action

Section 41 Section 42 Section 44 Total
0 0 0 0

Part 9 – Resources Related to the Access to Information Act

9.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $93,516
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $7,226
• Professional services contracts $0  
• Other $7,226
Total $100,742
9.2 Human Resources
Resources Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities
Full-time employees 1.31
Part-time and casual employees 0.00
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 0.00
Students 0.00
Total 1.31

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

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