Access to information Act - Annual Report to Parliament

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

Collaborator : Corporate Secretariat

Publish date : March 1, 2013

Summary :

This annual report deals with the activities of the Agency in implementing the Access to information Act for the fiscal year 2011-2012.

Table of Contents

  1. Foreword
  2. 1. Introduction
  3. 2. Access to Information and Privacy Office
  4. 3. Delegation of Authority
  5. 4. Interpretation of the Statistical Report on Requests for Access to Information
  6. 5. Training
  7. 6. Administrative Policies and Practices
  8. 7. Complaints and Investigations
  9. 8. Info Source
  10. 9. Reading Room
  11. 10. Activities Planned for 2012-2013
  12. Appendix: 2011-2012 Annual Statistical Report

Foreword

Mandate of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec

The Agency supports the development of the regions of Quebec by granting repayable or non-repayable contributions under its programs and initiatives.

Since April 3, 2012, this service delivery is based on quality standards and provided by advisors in each of the 12 business offices.

The Agency also provides information, guidance and advisory services for SMEs and NPOs.

Mission

Under its enabling legislation, which came into effect on October 5, 2005, the Agency’s mission is to promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those where slow economic growth is prevalent or where opportunities for productive employment are inadequate.

As part of its mission, it also undertakes to promote co-operation and complementarity with Quebec and communities in Quebec.

Vision

In the long term, Quebec's regions and communities will have increased their development capacity, vitality and prosperity in a significant and lasting manner, to the benefit of their citizens.

1. Introduction

The purpose of the Access to Information Act, enacted on July 1, 1983, is to extend the present laws of Canada to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. It enshrines the principle that government information should be available to the public, and is intended to complement existing procedures for access to government information.

All federal institutions are expected to make every reasonable effort to provide assistance, without regard for the identity of the person making the request. The institutions must also respond to the request accurately and completely and, subject to the regulations, provide timely access to the record in the format requested.

Access to Information Act
The Access to Information Act provides Canadians, permanent residents and anyone living in Canada with a general right of access to information held by federal government institutions, with some specific, limited exceptions.

Section 72 of the Act also stipulates that the head of a federal institution shall submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act within the institution.

This document deals with activities related to administration of the Act at the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec. A copy may be obtained from:

Access to Information and Privacy Office
Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montreal, Quebec H3B 2T9

2. Access to Information and Privacy Office

The Access to Information and Privacy Office (AIPO) is part of the Agency’s Corporate Secretariat. It is staffed by the Corporate Secretariat Manager, the Public Rights Co-ordinator and two officers who devote fifty percent of their time to processing access to information requests.

As the entity responsible for the Act, the AIPO represents the Agency with the public, the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), the Information and Privacy Commissioners and other federal departments and institutions.

The AIPO ensures, on behalf of the Agency, compliance with the legislation, regulations, procedures and overall directions of the government with regard to access to information. Overall, the AIPO plays a key role in processing requests for information and assisting applicants by co-ordinating all related administrative and legal activities. It develops advice, overall approaches, reports and procedures related to enforcement of the Act and plays a role with the Agency’s employees in terms of training and awareness raising with regard to the Act. Lastly, the AIPO co-ordinates the preparation of written questions from MPs and senators submitted in the House of Commons.

3. Delegation of Authority

Under the Agency’s enabling legislation, the President is named as the head. In addition to ensuring management of the institution and controlling management of its staff, she is also responsible for enforcement of the Access to Information Act. In 2010-2011, the Agency reviewed all delegated authorities under the Act. These authorities are now identified in a delegation tool that was signed on March 24, 2011 and may be consulted on the next page.

In this schedule, authority for enforcing the Act is delegated to the position of Manager, Corporate Secretariat, while most of the administrative authority has been transferred to the Co-ordinator of Public Rights. The schedule is part of the overall access action plan, which reflects current trends in government and is in line with major access to information principles. The Policy and Administrative Practices section provides additional details in this regard.

Delegation Schedule
Access to Information Act
Section Description Proposed delegation
Manager,
General Secretariat
Co-ordinator
7(a) Notice when access requested check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
7(b) Giving access to record check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
8(1) Transfer of request to another institution check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
9 Extension of time limits check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
11(2), (3), (4), (5), (6) Additional fees check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
12(2)(b) Language of access check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
12(3)(b) Access in alternative format check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
13 Exemption - Information obtained in confidence check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
14 Exemption - Federal-provincial affairs check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
15 Exemption - International affairs and defence check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
16 Exemption - Law enforcement and investigation check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
16.5 Exemption - Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
17 Exemption - Safety of individuals check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
18 Exemption - Economic interests of Canada check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
18.1 Exemption - Economic interests of government institutions check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
19 Exemption - Personal information check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
20 Exemption - Third party information check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
21 Exemption - Operations of government check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
22 Exemption - Testing procedures, tests and audits check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
22.1 Exemption - Audit working papers and draft audit reports check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
23 Exemption - Solicitor-client privilege check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
24 Exemption - Statutory prohibitions check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
25 Severability check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
26 Exemption - Information to be published check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
27(1), (4) Third-party notification check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
28(1)(b), (2), (4) Third-party notification check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
29(1) Where the Information Commissioner recommends disclosure check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
33 Advising Information Commissioner of third-party involvement check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
35(2)(b) Right to make representations check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
37(4) Access to be given to complainant check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
43(1) Notice to third-party (application to Federal Court for review) check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
44(2) Notice to applicant (application to Federal Court by third-party) check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
52(2), (3) Special rules for hearings check mark, means that this cell has been checked  
71(1) Facilities for inspection of manuals check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked
72 Annual report to Parliament check mark, means that this cell has been checked check mark, means that this cell has been checked

I approve the delegation schedule.
[original signed]
Suzanne Vinet, President
Date: March 24, 2011

4. Interpretation of the Statistical Report on Requests for Access to Information

2011-2012 Highlights

Requests received

The number of access requests received by the AIPO rose sharply in the past year: 35 requests received in 2011-2012 compared with 14 in the previous year. In addition to the requests received, two other requests were carried over from the previous year. This is the highest number of requests received in the past five years; in 2007-2008 the AIPO received 40 requests.

By the end of the year the AIPO had processed 29 of the requests it received, while 8 requests were carried over to 2012-2013.

Three days accounted for the receipt of 49% of all of these requests. In May 2011, 14% of the requests were submitted in a single day, while 26% of the year’s requests came in on the same day in August 2011, and a further 9% were received a bit later, in February 2012.

Graphic: Requests received

In 2009-2010, 24 requests were received and 3 others were carried forward from the previous year. In 2010-2011, 14 requests were received and 6 others were carried forward from the previous year. In 2011-2012, 35 requests were received and 2 others were carried forward from the previous year

Source of requests

In 2011-2012, most of the requests were submitted by the media, unlike the previous year, when most of the requests received were from the public.

Analysis of statistical reports from recent years does not indicate any consistency or major trend in the number of requests from the media, universities, the commercial sector, organizations or the public.

Graphic: Sources

2009-2010 : Media (19), Public (5); 2010-2011 : Media (3), Commercial (1), Public (10); 2011-2012 : Media (20), Organization (8), Public (7)

Sources
Fiscal Year Media Academia Business Organization Public
2009-2010 19 0 0 0 5
2010-2011 3 0 1 0 10
2011-2012 20 0 0 8 7

Purpose of requests

The purpose of requests is as variable as their source. However, some major topics have been resurfacing on an annual basis for many years. Requests handled in 2011-2012 dealt with the following topics:

Topic % of requests
The awarding of grants and contributions 49%
Information documents 31%
Service contracts awarded by the Agency 14%
Administration of expenses 6%

Disposition and completion times for requests handled

At the end of the fiscal year, a total of 29 requests had been handled. One of these requests could not be processed, as the documents that were requested did not exist. Twenty-four of the twenty-eight requests processed resulted in the total or partial disclosure of documents, while in the case of four other requests, all of the documents were subject to a total exemption.

Type of request Number of Days
1 to 15 16 to 30 31 to 60 61 to
 120
121 to 
180
181 to 
365
365
 and over
Total disclosure   6 3        
Partial disclosure 1 5 4 2 1 1 1
Total exemption   2 1 1      
Non-existent document   1          
TOTAL 1 14 8 3 1 1 1

Processing times varied considerably this year, with 52% of the claims being processed in less than 30 days. This situation can mostly be attributed to the nature of the documents requested, with consultations being required in 59% of all cases.

Invocation of exceptions and exclusions In the case of 9 requests, the AIPO fully disclosed the information being sought without invoking protection, and applied exemptions and exclusions in 19 other cases.

The AIPO, through representations by the Agency’s Legal Services, also had to consult the Privy Council Office regarding the application of section 69 with respect to the exclusion of confidential documents of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada. With these mandatory consultations, processing time ranged between 61 and 180 days depending on the nature of the access request.

The following table identifies the exemptions and exclusions invoked in 2011-2012. It should be noted that more than one section may apply to a single request.

Sections Invoked Frequency
Information obtained in confidence
13(1)c)

1
Federal-provincial affairs
14b)

1
Investigations
16(1)a)(ii)

1
Personal information
19 (1)

8
Third party information
20(1)b)
20(1)c)
20(1)d)

5
2
2
Advice and recommendations to government
21(1)a)
21(1)b)

6
2
Testing procedures, tests and audits
22.1(1)

2
Solicitor-client privilege
23

3
Refusal of access where information to be published
26
2
Confidential documents
69(1) e)
69(1)g) re c)
69(1)g) re e)

1
2
2

Communication of disclosed documents

In the case of 17 requests, hard copies were used to disclose most of the documents that were requested; responses to 7 requests were sent electronically, often in the form of a CD containing the requested documents. As has been the case for many years, once again, none of the documents was consulted in the Agency’s reading room.

Pages processed and disclosed

The number of relevant pages processed and disclosed in 2011-2012 was up considerably from the previous year. This number can, indeed, vary considerably from one year to the next depending on the purpose of the requests and the quantity of relevant documents in the Agency’s possession.

This past fiscal year, 4,175 pages were processed, of which 2,361 were disclosed. The gap between the number processed and the number disclosed can be explained by the fact that 1,657 of the pages processed were totally exempted because of the information they contained. In 2010-2011, only 618 pages were disclosed.

Consultations

Because of its economic development activities, the Agency has many documents that contain commercial, technical and financial information affecting third parties. For this reason it is not unusual that the requests submitted require consultations with third parties, which results in the waiving of the time period provided for under the Act.

To ensure compliance with the provisions of the Act, consultations were held for 17 of the 29 requests that were processed. For each time extension, the requesters were informed of the extension as specified in the Act.

This figure is much higher than that of the previous year, when only three consultations took place. However, it should be pointed out that, most of the time, the number of consultations is proportional to the number of requests submitted with respect to the awarding of a contribution to a third party. As 49% of the requests were for this purpose in 2011-2012, the AIPO had to conduct more consultations than in previous years in order to comply with the requirements of the Act.

Although the Agency carries out consultations in order to provide as much information as possible, in accordance with the spirit and the letter of the Act, some requests are delayed because of these consultations. Responses to five of the 17 requests requiring consultations were provided after the prescribed deadline, resulting in a delay in processing.

The following table shows the duration of the time extensions for each type of consultation.

Graphic: Duration and Type of Consultation

Extensions of less then 30 days: 6 pursuant to consultations with other departments, 6 pursuant to consultations with third parties. Extensions of 31 to 60 days: 5 pursuant to consultations with third parties. Extensions of 61 to 120 days: 2 pursuant to consultations linked to section 69. Extensions of 121 to 180 days: None. Extensions of 181 to 365 days:  1 pursuant to a consultation linked to section 69. Extensions of more then 365 days: None

Consultation requests from other federal agencies

In 2011-2012, the AIPO processed 15 consultation requests from other federal institutions, making a total of 1,082 pages to be processed. In the case of 10 of these 15 requests, recommendations were made to disclose all of the documents in their entirety, while a partial disclosure of documents was recommended in three instances, with processing being carried out within 15 days in all cases. No recommendations were made respecting the remaining 2 consultation requests, since the documents did not concern the Agency.

Fees and exemptions

The AIPO complies with Treasury Board Secretariat guidelines regarding the imposition of and the exemption from access fees. For example, it waives copying fees for amounts under $25. For higher sums it determines, based on the perceived public interest, whether it is appropriate to charge the full cost or not.

For the year covered by this report, the net sum of $155 was received in application fees and the sum of $50 was invoiced for document preparation. At the same time, the AIPO waived the $24 fee to be paid by requesters for presenting requests and producing responses.

Costs

Costs related to the administration of the Act reached $149.346, which includes salary costs of $138,638 (an average equivalent of 2 FTEs) and $10,708 in administration costs, primarily consisting of training costs, travel costs, software leasing costs and production and translation costs.

Compared with the total expenditures of the previous year ($117,691), salary costs increased on account of the arrival of new officers assigned to processing requests, and administrative costs fell during the financial year as a result of the purchase, in 2010-2011, of software for co-ordinating and processing access requests.

5. Training

In 2011-2012, following submission of its action plan, the AIPO looked into the training needs of Agency staff. Based on this analysis, a mandatory course entitled Access to Information and Privacy was designed by the AIPO team, intended to make all Agency employees aware of compliance with acts and regulations related to access to information and privacy.

This training took the form of a session which could be shaped to employee needs. The first session, three hours in length, enabled employees to understand the legislation and their roles in the processing of requests for access to information and personal information. The training was also shaped into a one and a half hour initiation session, intended to provide general information for employees with no specific role in the processing of requests for access to information and personal information.

This training was presented by AIPO officers in a classroom setting for employees at Head Office in Montreal and business offices in the surrounding area. Employees in the other business offices and external branches were also able to attend the training via telepresence. A variety of dynamic participatory learning activities were used to support trainers throughout the training session. In addition, a practical guide on the material presented was handed out to all participants.

Most Agency employees attended the three-hour training session. At the end of the session, they were able to:

The 30 sessions presented between November 2011 and April 2012 enabled the AIPO team to train 316 employees out of a total of 399 FTEs. The objective for 2012-2013 will be to reach employees who have not yet received the training and present it to new employees as required, ensuring that the other employees maintain the knowledge they have acquired.

In addition to this training series, a coffee and chat session was held as part of Canadian Right to Know Week in September 2011. The event attracted 35 employees interested in attending a discussion meeting where they were encouraged to ask questions of AIPO employees. During the event, a leaflet containing e-mail addresses related to privacy was distributed to participants.

All in all, the training sessions and the coffee and chat were appreciated by Agency employees, allowed participants to become familiar with the legislation and clarified the work of the AIPO.

6. Administrative Policies and Practices

Procedure

The AIPO’s Access to Information and Personal Information Procedure has been in place for two years. It was submitted to and approved by the Agency’s senior management in March 2011. It was then presented to employees through the Agency’s intranet network. It has not been amended in 2012.

The Directive on the Administration of the Access to Information Act, which took effect in March 2010, was used as a guide in implementing the new procedure. It is intended to facilitate compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements, set out the roles and responsibilities of those involved in processing requests for access and model practices and procedures for the efficient processing of access requests.

In addition to presenting the roles and responsibilities of the various individuals involved, this procedure presents the process for handling requests, intended to illustrate the various processing and approval stages in effect at the Agency, based on the steps indicated on the next page.

Receipt

As part of a well defined process, the AIPO is responsible for receiving and processing requests submitted under the Act and provides leadership in this regard. The AIPO then forwards the requests to the office of primary interest, which is then responsible for forwarding the requested documents and providing the AIPO with expert advice.

Processing

Once the document extraction process has been completed, the AIPO analyses the documents on the basis of the Act, consults the office of primary interest, the departments concerned and third parties, if necessary. It then informs the branches and sectors concerned of the recommended dispositions, which are then submitted to the Manager, Corporate Secretariat, for approval.

Communication

A 48-hour notice included in the AIPO’s decision is sent simultaneously to the managers involved. The documents are then prepared for reporting and sent to the applicants.

Proactive Disclosure

The Agency has implemented a series of measures to strengthen public sector management by enhancing transparency within the organization. One of these measures involves the proactive disclosure of financial and human resources-related information. On the Agency’s Internet site, members of the public have, since 2005, been able to obtain quarterly information on travel and hospitality expenses, contracts, the reclassification of positions and grants and contributions.

At the same time, work continues to make grant and contribution disclosure lists more user-friendly with lists that allow users to sort information. This will enable to AIPO to provide greater assistance for requesters who wish to obtain lists of contributions that have been disclosed by enabling them simply to extract the information they are looking for using proactive disclosure.

Summary of processed requests

In compliance with the Directive on the Administration of the Access to Information Act, each month the Agency posts a summary of completed access to information requests dating back to May 2011. This publication stands alongside the new Internet pages posted on line in 2011 and is intended to assist the public and requesters in particular by providing practical information.

Access requests arising from the publication of the summaries are processed informally, as recommended in the Guide for Posting Summaries of Completed Access to Information Requests.

A total of four requests have been processed this way in 2011-2012.

Informal requests

Where possible, the Agency tries to deal with some requests informally. These are essentially requests for lists of contributions with specific research criteria. Requests handled in this way do not require a deposit and do not entitle the requester to file a complaint with the information commissioner.

Although the number of requests handled informally is not shown in the statistical report, it represents a substantial number of the access requests received and processed by the AIPO. In 2011-2012, the Agency responded informally to 17 requests regarding lists of contributions, in addition to the four access requests related to the summary of completed access to information requests.

The AIPO has been responding to this type of request for a number of years because it feels that, although the information is publically available on the Agency’s proactive disclosure site, it is difficult for people to find the information they want because there is no user-friendly search or sorting engine. In addition, as indicated in the Proactive Disclosure section, work is continuing to make grant and contribution disclosure lists more user-friendly with the creation of lists that would allow information sorting. Once this work is completed, those requesting lists of contributions will be able to go to the Proactive Disclosure section to get the lists normally obtained through informal requests.

Graphic: Informal Requests

2009-2010 : 35; 2010-2011 : 29; 2011-2012: 21

Development of advice

In addition to the expert advice services related to access to information provided to the Agency’s employees, the AIPO develops advice with regard to the communication of internal audit reports and environmental assessments stored in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Registry. This exercise assures the responsibility centres concerned that the public communication of their reports is done in accordance with the Act.

In 2011-2012, 4 environmental assessments and 5 audit reports were analysed by the AIPO.

Graphic: Development of Advice

2009-2010 : 19 (5 internal audit reports and 14 environmental assessments); 2010-2011 : 27 (10 internal audit reports and 17 environmental assessments); 2011-2012 : 9 (5 internal audit reports and 4 environmental assessments)

Written questions from Parliament

The AIPO also co-ordinates written questions from MPs and senators. These questions are forwarded by the Privy Council Office to the various federal institutions concerned. Under House of Commons Rules, institutions have 45 days to prepare answers, which the minister responsible must then sign. These questions deal with a multitude of subjects, from the granting of contributions to administrative spending by the institutions.

In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of questions received and processed. For this reason, a great deal of effort was needed to ensure that deadlines were met. However, with the election calls in 2011-2012, there was a substantial drop in the number of written questions processed. The table below provides a clear picture of the situation.

Graphic: Written questions from Parliament

Questions from MPs handled - 2006-2007 : 11; 2007-2008 : 24; 2008-2009 : 29; 2009-2010 : 100; 2010-2011 : 142; 2011-2012 : 66

  2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012
# questions 11 24 29 100 142 66

7. Complaints and Investigations

In 2011-2012, the Agency received a new complaint about a refusal to disclose information. However, this complaint was withdrawn a few months later by the complainant. It concerned a request requiring the scrutiny and analysis of 605 pages of documents and consultations with third parties.

8. Info Source

Every year, the AIPO sends the Treasury Board Secretariat an update of the Agency’s information bank for addition to the publication Info Source.

9. Reading Room

In order to encourage the public to use existing mechanisms for obtaining information and to meet the requirements of the Act, the Agency can designate a room in its Montreal office to be used for reading and consulting documents. To provide better services for its clients in the regions, arrangements may also be made with the business offices, upon request, to enable applicants to consult documents on site.

10. Activities Planned for 2012-2013

The AIPO will continue its initial mandate, which is to respond to all requests for access to information, in accordance with the spirit and letter of the Act.

In recent years, the AIPO’s objective has been staff consolidation and the implementation of business practices that complied with the directives and regulations as well as the major trends in the area of access to information. In the coming year, the AIPO will strive to continue working towards this goal. This objective will be achieved by:

2012-2013

Appendix: 2011-2012 Annual Statistical Report

Name of institution: Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions

Reporting period: 01/04/2011 to 31/03/2012

Part 1 - Requests under the Access to Information Act

1.1 Requests
Number of Requests Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 35
Outstanding from previous period 2
Total 37
Closed during reporting period 29
Carried over to next reporting period 8

1.2 Source of requests
Source Number of Requests
Media 20
Academia 0
Business (Private Sector) 0
Organization 8
Public 7
Total 35

Part 2 - Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 0 6 3 0 0 0 0 9
Disclosed in part 1 5 4 2 1 1 1 15
All exempted 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 4
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Request transferred 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Treated informally 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 14 8 3 1 1 1 29

2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
13(1) (a) 0
13(1) (b) 0
13(1) (c) 1
13(1) (d) 0
13(1) (e) 0
14(a) 0
14(b) 1
15(1) -I .A.* 0
15(1) - Def.* 0
15(1) - S.A.* 0
16(1) (a) (i) 0
16(1) (a) (ii) 1
16(1) (a) (iii) 0
16(1) (b) 0
16(1) (c) 0
16(1) (d) 0
16(2) (a) 0
16(2) (b) 0
16(2) (c) 0
16(3) 0
16.1(1) (a) 0
16.1(1) (b) 0
16.1(1) (c) 0
16.1(1) (d) 0
16.2(1) 0
16.3 0
16.4(1) (a) 0
16.4(1) (b) 0
16.5 0
17 0
18(a) 0
18(b) 0
18(c) 0
18(d) 0
18.1(1) (a) 0
18.1(1) (b) 0
18.1(1) (c) 0
18.1(1) (d) 0
19(1) 8
20(1) (a) 0
20(1) (b) 5
20(1) (b.1) 0
20(1) (c) 2
20(1) (d) 2
20.1 0
20.2 0
20.4 0
21(1) (a) 6
21(1) (b) 2
21(1) (c) 0
21(1) (d) 0
22 0
22.1(1) 2
23 3
24(1) 0
26 2

*I.A.: International Affairs
Def.: Defence of Canada
S.A.: Subversive Activities

2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
68(a) 0
68(b) 0
68(c) 0
68.1 0
68.2(a) 0
68.2(b) 0
69(1) (a) 0
69(1) (b) 0
69(1) (c) 0
69(1) (d) 0
69(1) (e) 1
69(1) (f) 0
69(1) (g) re (a) 0
69(1) (g) re (b) 0
69(1) (g) re (c) 2
69(1) (g) re (d) 0
69(1) (g) re (e) 2
69(1) (g) re (f) 0
69.1(1) 0

2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 5 4 0
Disclosed in part 12 3 0
Total 17 7 0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 851 849 9
Disclosed in part 1667 1512 15
All exempted 1657 0 4
All excluded 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0

2.5 Complexity 2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Type of request Less than 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed
Disposition Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 6 152 3 697 0 0
Disclosed in part 12 256 2 402 1 854
All exempted 0 0 2 0 2 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 18 408 7 1099 3 854

2.5 Complexity 2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests (continued)
Type of request 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Disposition Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0

2.5 Complexity 2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Assessment of fees Legal Advice Sought Other Total
All disclosed 3 0 0 0 3
Disclosed in part 12 1 6 5 24
All exempted 2 0 2 0 4
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Abandoned 0 0 0 0 0
Total 17 1 8 5 31

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
5 0 2 2 1

2.6 Deemed refusals
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 0 2 2
16 to 30 days 0 2 2
31 to 60 days 0 0 0
61 to 120 days 0 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 1 1
More than 365 days 0 0 0
Total 0 5 5

2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French 0 0 0
French to English 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 - Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
All disclosed 0 0 1 2
Disclosed in part 0 3 4 8
All exempted 0 0 1 1
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 0 0 0 0
Total 0 3 6 11

3.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 9(1)(a)
Interference with operations
9(1)(b)
Consultation
9(1)(c)
Third party notice
Section 69 Other
30 days or less 0 0 6 6
31 to 60 days 0 0 0 5
61 to 120 days 0 2 0 0
121 to 180 days 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 days 0 1 0 0
365 days or more 0 0 0 0
Total 0 3 6 11

Part 4 - Fees

Part 4 - Fees
Fee Type Fee Collected Fee Waived or Refunded
# of requests Amount Number of requests Amount
Application 31 $155 4 $20
Search 0 $0 0 $0
Production 0 $0 2 $4
Programming 0 $0 0 $0
Preparation 1 $50 0 $0
Altemative format 0 $0 0 $0
Reproduction 0 $0 0 $0
Total 32 $205 6 $24

Part 5 - Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other
government institutions
Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during reporting period 14 1080 0 0
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 1 2 0 0
Total 15 1082 0 0
Closed during the reporting period 15 1082 0 0
Pending at the end of the reporting period 0 0 0 0

5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other government institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
Disclose in part 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
Total 14 1 0 0 0 0 0 15

5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days than 365 days Total
Disclose entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclose in part 0 0 0 0 0 0   0
Exempt entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Exclude entirely 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 6 - Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

Part 6 - Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences
Number of days Number of responses received Number of responses received past deadline
1 to 15 0 0
16 to 30 0 0
31 to 60 0 0
61 to 120 2 0
121 to 180 0 1
181 to 365 0 0
More than 365 0 0
Total 2 1

Part 7 - Resources related to the Access to Information Act

7.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries $138,638
Overtime $0
Goods and Services $10,708
• Professional services contracts $0  
• Other $10,708
Total $149,346

7.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time to ATI activities Dedicated part-time to ATI activities Total
Full-time employees 1 3 4
Part-time and casual employees 0 0 0
Regional staff 0 0 0
Consultants and agency personnel 0 0 0
Students 0 0 0
Total 1 3 4

Appendix B-1
Additional reporting requirements – Access to Information Act

Part III – Exemptions invoked

None of the following exemptions was invoked during the 2011-2012 fiscal year

Paragraph 13(1)(e) 
Subsection 16.1(1)(a) 
Subsection 16.1(1)(b) 
Subsection 16.1(1)(c)
Subsection 16.1(1)(d)
Subsection 16.2(1)
Subsection 16.3
Subsection 16.4(1)(a)
Subsection 16.4(1)(b)
Subsection 16.5
Subsection 18.1(1)(a)
Subsection 18.1(1)(b)
Subsection 18.1(1)(c)
Subsection 18.1(1)(d)
Subsection 20(1)(b.1)
Subsection 20.1
Subsection 20.2
Subsection 20.4
Subsection 22.1(1)

Part IV – Exclusions cited

None of the following exclusions was cited during the 2011-2012 fiscal year

Subsection 68.1
Subsection 68.2(a)
Subsection 68.2(b)
Subsection 69.1(1)

 

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