2013-14 Reports on Plans and Priorities

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About this publication

Publication author : Canada Economic Development for Quebec regions

ISBN number : 1494-3867

Publish date : March 28, 2013

Summary :

Read through this Report, which presents the Agency’s priorities and expected results in 2013-14.

Table of Contents

  1. Minister's Message
  2. 1. Agency Overview
  3. 2. Analysis of programs for the strategic outcome
  4. 3. Supplementary Information
  5. Table: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)
  6. Table: Greening of government operations (GGO)
  7. Table: Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations (next three fiscal years)
  8. Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue
  9. 4. Other items of interest

Minister's Message

The Honourable Denis Lebel

I am pleased to submit the Report on Plans and Priorities 2013-14 of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec.

The global economy has posed major challenges for Canada’s enterprises and communities over the past few years, and still remains fragile and uncertain. The Government of Canada therefore undertook in its last Budget to foster growth and employment and increase the country’s prosperity, while ensuring responsible management of spending.

In 2013-14, the Agency intends to play its role by pursuing three main priorities. First, it will continue to foster the development of enterprises in Quebec, while paying special attention to communities with lower growth potential. To that end, the Agency will build on entrepreneurship and help enterprises become more competitive by focussing on productivity, expansion of manufacturing SMEs, innovation, technology transfer, commercialization and exports.

The Agency will also strengthen the economy of Quebec’s communities, in particular by completing the implementation of the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF). This ad-hoc Canada-wide program leads to the rehabilitation, modernization or expansion of community infrastructure with a view to generating economic spinoffs, and improving the quality of life in our communities.

Finally, the Agency will pursue its transformation and modernization this year, in order to become more efficient, yield savings, and offer improved customer service. For instance, it will continue modernizing its procedures so as to provide clients with access to online services. It will also maintain its efforts to simplify and optimize its grants and contributions management processes and tools.

I invite you to read through this Report, which presents the Agency’s priorities and expected results in 2013-14. I am convinced that Agency intervention will help enterprises and communities position themselves more effectively to contend with the current economic context, while contributing to the economic growth of the regions of Quebec.

Denis Lebel
Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities
and Minister of the Economic Development Agency of Canada
for the Regions of Quebec

1. Agency Overview

1.1 Raison d’être

The object of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec (the Agency) is to promote the long-term economic development of the regions of Quebec by giving special attention to those regions where slow economic growth is prevalent or that do not have enough opportunities for productive employment.

Through its economic role, the Agency is central to government priorities with respect to the economy and employment. It is present in all Quebec regions, and works in conjunction with local organizations. The Agency supports communities and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) so they can take part in the economy of tomorrow and achieve their full potential by building on their strengths, in particular by supporting the improvement of SMEs’ performance, productivity and innovation capability. Furthermore, the Agency provides that support to regions facing major crises by helping them diversify their economic base so as to enhance their long-term development.

1.2 Responsibilities

Through its business offices, the Agency’s presence is well-rooted in all Quebec regions. It acts in relation to enterprises—predominantly SMEs—and non-profit organizations (NPOs). The Agency supports SMEs and NPOs in their development primarily by providing financial assistance for project implementation. The Agency’s approach is inspired by the best practices identified with respect to regional economic development. It is:

In line with Government of Canada priorities, the Agency initiated in 2011-12 the rollout of its transformation and modernization by putting in place initiatives aimed at fostering:

Thus, the Agency revised its strategic outcome and simplified its Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) and its performance measurement, as well as its grants and contributions (G&C) programs. Since April 1, 2012, the Agency has had one regular G&C program, the Quebec Economic Development Program.Footnote1

In addition to this program, the Agency contributes to the design and implementation of Canada-wide programs and targeted ad-hoc initiatives. Over the coming year, a single ad-hoc initiative will be in effect, namely, the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF), which aims to support the rehabilitation and improvement of existing community infrastructure. This initiative is scheduled to terminate on March 31, 2014.

Agency G&C programs and initiatives, 2013-14

Regular program:

Canada-wide program implemented in Quebec by the Agency:

Infrastructure programs:

Ad-hoc initiativeFootnote2:

To ensure optimum implementation of all its programs and initiatives, the Agency will implement its priorities while recognizing the special characteristics of Quebec’s different regions.

1.3 Strategic outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

To fulfil its mandate, the Agency aims to attain one strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy. The following table presents the Agency’s PAAFootnote3, in effect since April 1, 2012, illustrating the full framework of the Agency’s programs and subprograms, as well as the contribution to the strategic outcome.

The PAA was revised since the Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP) 2011-12 so as to illustrate the simplified approach preferred by the Agency toward economic development, and in terms of communication of information on its programs and their performance.

Program Alignment Architecture
Strategic outcome Programs Subprograms
Quebec's regions have a growing economy. 1.1 Business development 1.1.1 Support for entrepreneurship
1.1.2 Enterprises' performance
1.2 Regional economic development 1.2.1 Mobilization of regions
1.2.2 Investment in the regions
1.3 Strengthening of community economies 1.3.1 Community Futures Program
1.3.2 Modernization of infrastructure
1.3.3 Ad-hoc targeted support (As required, dedicated funding only)
1.4 Internal services

This Report sets out the plans and priorities in line with these components. Further information on the Agency’s strategic outcome is presented in Section 2.

1.4 Corporate priorities

Priorities represent the areas on which the Agency has decided to focus. They are established on the basis of Government of Canada priorities, Departmental targeted results and the regions’ economic challenges.

The Agency has selected three priorities for 2013-14. These are in line with the priorities presented in the most recent RPPs, since the communities’ and SMEs’ challenges are as present as ever. The Agency’s overall actions are covered in Section 2, which presents total spending and planned results by program.

Over the next few years, Quebec’s communities and enterprises will have to continue to contend with a demanding economic context associated primarily, in the long term, with the consequences of global competition and a strong Canadian dollar, as well as the aging population which creates pressure on the renewal of entrepreneurship, particularly in Quebec where aging is more marked.

In the more immediate term, Quebec enterprises and communities will be operating in a context of uncertainty and economic downturn, associated among other things with the sovereign debt crisis, the European recession and the slow pace of the economic recovery in the United States. In Canada, lower growth in domestic demand will have an impact on enterprises’ business opportunities and regions’ development opportunities, which should consequently be fewer in number.

In that context, it is essential for the Agency to continue supporting Quebec’s enterprises—primarily SMEs and NPOs—and communities.

Priority # 1:

Contribute to Quebec’s long-term economic growth and prosperity by supporting enterprises’ growth (directly or via NPOs), while paying particular attention to communities with lower growth potential

Type

Priority previously committed to during FY 2012-13 (revised wording)

Link to program

1.1 Business development

Description

Why is this a priority?
Enterprises are a significant engine of regions’ economic activity, and create employment and wealth. They are a major lever of Quebec’s prosperity.

Plan for meeting the priority
Nurture the growth of Quebec enterprises—through SMEs and NPOs—by means of support for:

Special attention will be paid to enterprises located in communities experiencing low economic growth.

Enterprises generate a large share of economic activity, thus contributing to job creation. In a context of global competition, global economic downturn and aging population, the pool of enterprises has to be renewed and to stand out more effectively. To continue their development and ensure their sustainability, enterprises have to continue investing to enhance their competitiveness.

To fulfil its economic development mandate, the Agency intends to back projects that foster the development of enterprises through support for SMEs and NPOs. Thus, to help enterprises develop in the current context, the Agency fosters:

Entrepreneurship

The Agency will support entrepreneurship, by nurturing enterprise creation and succession, in order to increase the emergence of new entrepreneurs in Quebec and ensure business succession.

Enterprise competitiveness

The Agency will support enterprises by helping them become more high-performance so as to contribute to Quebec’s economic growth.

Priority # 2:

Contribute to strengthening the economy of the regions and communities through targeted ad hoc support

Type

Priority previously committed to during FY 2012-13 (revised wording)

Link to program

1.3 Strengthening of community economies

Description

Why is this a priority?

Regions and communities contribute to Quebec’s long-term economic growth and prosperity. In some cases, ad-hoc support is required to help strengthen the economy and vitality of Quebec communities.

Plan for meeting the priority

Contribute to strengthening the regions’ and communities’ economy by means of targeted ad hoc support through the:

In line with its mandate, the Agency will continue to support projects that contribute to strengthening the economy of Quebec communities and generating economic spinoffs. In this context, the Agency will continue to implement the CIIF, an ad-hoc Canada-wide program that falls under Canada’s Economic Action Plan 2012.

Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF)

In 2013-14, the Agency will continue to support projects aimed at supporting upgrading and improvement, including expansion, of community infrastructure. This support will help improve the quality of community facilities and generate economic spinoffs, including job creation, in Quebec communities. The CIIF will terminate on March 31, 2014.

Priority # 3:

Continue the Agency’s transformation and modernization

Type

Priority previously committed to during FY 2011-12 (revised wording)

Link to program

All

Description

Why is this a priority?

In line with Government of Canada priorities, the Agency will continue the transformation and modernization of its procedures and tools so as to generate efficiency gains and savings and provide its clients with improved service.

Plan for meeting the priority

Continue implementation of the Agency’s transformation and modernization by:

In the wake of the 2010 Strategic Review, of the end of Canada’s Economic Action Plan and some temporary programs, and the savings measures in Budget 2012, the Agency undertook a transformation and modernization exercise that will continue in 2013-14. To date, this exercise has enabled the Agency to generate efficiency gains, as well as modernizing its service delivery.

The Agency intends to continue its transformation and modernization efforts by implementing other activities in that regard over the next few years. Thus the Agency will:

Alongside its modernization and simplification process, the Agency will continue to work with its partners within the framework of government initiatives aimed at the optimization and modernization of internal services. This collaboration will generate possible efficiency gains in the medium term.

1.5 Analysis of risks

In its desire to attain its results, the Agency has to have an overview of the changing factors that have a marked impact on its environment and to integrate these factors into its decision-making processes so as to respond more effectively to the new needs of Quebec enterprises, primarily SMEs and NPOs and communities.

Within the framework of its transformation and modernization, the Agency has to implement several innovative initiatives simultaneously, in order to be more efficient and deliver enhanced customer service. Consequently, the integration of risk management in Departmental planning continues to be as important as ever.

The Agency’s corporate risks are determined through a rigorous approach involving all branches along with senior management. It was in a perspective of evolving internal and external factors that the Agency drew up the profile of its main corporate risks representing the risk sectors most likely to hamper the attainment of anticipated results and affect its performance in terms of efficiency and effectiveness of management practices. The mitigation strategies identified will be implemented and monitored to reduce the possibility of identified risks occurring.

Key corporate risks

Economic risk and institutional capacity

Risk that the pursuit of priorities and results expected from the Agency’s economic development programs may be affected by the economic context.

Mitigation strategies

Key corporate risks

Management of change in a context of transformation of the Public Service

Risk that the planned implementation of the Agency’s axes of modernization and change management thrusts may be affected.

Mitigation strategies

Key corporate risks

Human resources management

Risk that the Agency may not have sufficient capacity to attain its results and maintain compliance with all its obligations.

Mitigation strategies

Key corporate risks

Information management

Risk that the Agency may not have reliable, relevant information on a timely basis to support its decision-making, reporting and transformation needs.

Mitigation strategies

1.6 Planning summary

This section presents planned financial resources (grants and contributions, and operating costs) and human resources (expressed as a full-time equivalent – FTE), along with a summary chart portraying Agency planning for the next three fiscal years. Further information is presented in Section 2.

Human and financial resources

Financial resources (in thousands of dollars)

Total budgetary expenditures

Main Estimates 2013-14

Planned spending 2013-14 Planned spending 2014-15 Planned spending 2015-16
254,931 254,931 220,542 220,502

The decrease in financial and human resources between 2013-14 and 2014-15 stems from the termination of funding for temporary initiatives, such as the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund and the Montréal Planetarium project.

Moreover, planned spending in 2013-14 includes an upward adjustment owing to the reinvestment of revenues from contribution repayments by clients. The fact that this same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2014-15 and 2015-16 partially explains observed variations.

Note that the data presented in the tables are forecasts based on the information available when this Report was drafted. The renewal or addition of initiatives could therefore lead to variations in the amount and number of resources allocated.

Human resources (FTE)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
314 301 300

The variation in the number of human resources over the next few years is attributable in particular to the savings measures in Budget 2012. The application of decisions within the framework of the administrative services review also contributed to the decline in the number of FTEs.

Human resources planning

As mentioned earlier, the Agency will in the next few years have several challenges to meet, to which is added the continued implementation of the transformation process at the Agency.

In this context, human resources management will remain a major concern for the Agency. Judicious human resources planning is necessary to ensure a match between operational needs and the staff in place, and to prepare the next generation of employees. To complete its transformation successfully, it is also essential for the Agency to meet the major challenge of innovation, both in its procedures and in the use of advanced technological tools. It will thus continue to increase its efficiency and effectiveness in how it provides services and organizes work.

In this regard, the Agency will continue in particular its work to simplify human resources processes, and this will enable it, among other things, to improve its practices and facilitate the medium-term implementation of an integrated human resources management software package.

At the same time, the Agency will pursue implementation of its action plan to follow up on the findings of the 2011 Public Service Employee Survey and thus cater to employees’ concerns. This plan, in which priority is given to employee mobilization, also emphasizes respect for employees’ professional competencies; creation of work conditions conducive to fostering innovation, initiative and creativity; recognition and awareness of employees’ contribution; and communications within the organization.

Planning summary table for programsFootnote4 (in thousands of dollars)
Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.
Programs Forecast spending 2012-13Footnote5 Planned spending Alignment to Government of Canada outcomesFootnote6
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Business development 137,067 152,565 138,504 138,547 Strong economic growth
Regional economic development 20,473 39,284 35,856 35,867 Strong economic growth
Strengthening of community economies 92,328 48,272 32,469 32,296 Strong economic growth
Partial totalFootnote7 249,868 240,120 206,829 206,711  
Planning summary table for Internal services (in thousands of dollars)
Program Forecast spending 2012-13 Planned spending
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
Internal services 18,908 14,811 13,713 13,791
Total partiel 18,908 14,811 13,713 13,791
Planning summary total (in thousands of dollars)
Strategic outcome: Quebec's regions have a growing economy.
Programs and Internal services Forecast spending 2012-13 Planned spending
2013-14Footnote8 2014-15 2015-16
Total 268,776 254,931 220,542 220,502

The decrease in planned spending is primarily observable between 2012-13 and 2014-15 under the Strengthening of community economies program, and is attributable to the termination of several temporary initiatives.

1.7 Expenditure profile

Canada’s Economic Action Plan (CEAP)Footnote9 had an impact on spending trends between 2009-10 and 2011-12. As scheduled, CEAP terminated on March 31, 2011, except for the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program, which ended on October 31, 2011.

The Agency is now reverting to its regular budget base, owing to the termination of funding for temporary initiatives and large-scale projects in 2013-14. It will also continue over the next few years to implement the cost-saving measures in Budget 2012. Planned spending will thus decline from $225 million in 2013-14 to $221 million in 2015-16.

1.8 Estimates by vote

Information on the Agency’s appropriations is available in the Main Estimates 2013-14.

1.9 Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) describes the undertaking made by the Government of Canada to increase the transparency of environmental decision-making by clearly stating its main environmental protection goals and strategic targets. The government will be consulting the population in 2013-14 concerning the second three-year cycle of the FSDS (2013-16). The FSDS for 2013-16 will be completed in 2013-14, and will be presented in the Departmental Performance Report 2013-14.

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ensures that these objectives are taken into account in its decision-making processes. Thus, within the context of the federal Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process, any new policy, plan or program initiative includes an analysis of its impact on the attainment of FSDS goals and targets. Where applicable, the findings of the SEA are made public when a new program is announced, thus illustrating the Agency’s commitment to attaining the FSDS goals and targets.

The Agency contributes to Theme 1 – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality and Theme 4 – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government, as indicated by the visual identifiers below.

Theme I
Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality

Theme IV
Shrinking the Environmental Footprint-Beginning with Government

These contributions are components of the following programs and are explained in further detail in Section 2:

Further information on Agency activities in support of sustainable development is available in Section 2 of this Report, and at: www.dec-ced.gc.ca/eng/services/environmental-affairs/index.html.

Additional information on the FSDS is also available on the Environment Canada Website.

2. Analysis of programs for the strategic outcome

This section provides information on the Agency’s strategic outcome and programs. For each program in the PAA, a description is presented, along with planning highlights.

2.1 Strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy

The Agency’s strategic outcome reflects the object of the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ActFootnote10, which came into effect on October 5, 2005, namely, to promote the development and diversification of the economy of the regions of Quebec.

The Government of Canada has undertaken to foster the prosperity of all regions. It intends to stimulate growth through new investment from enterprises, innovation and knowledge transfer, trade, modernization of infrastructure, and more besides. By virtue of its mandate, the Agency is central to the government’s major priorities. Also, the Agency’s strategic outcome contributes to strong economic growth, one of the Government of Canada’s targeted results.

Challenges associated with the strategic outcome

In order to respond to the challenges of the Quebec economy and nurture long-term growth, the Agency’s intervention priorities must contribute to the sustainable renewal of Quebec’s regional economies.

Quebec’s enterprises and regions will thus have to continue to contend with the long-term economic trends represented by global competition, a strong Canadian dollar and an aging population, which creates pressure on the renewal of entrepreneurship, particularly in Quebec where aging is more marked.

In the shorter term, over the next year, Quebec’s enterprises and regions will be operating in a context of uncertainty and economic downturn. On the international scene, the impact of the sovereign debt crisis and the European recession will continue to be felt on global trade. In Canada, high household debt levels and tighter mortgage rules point to slower growth in domestic demand. Enterprises’ business opportunities and regions’ development opportunities should be fewer in number as a result.

With regard to these trends, enterprises must increase their competitiveness by enhancing their productivity, innovating and developing new markets. The regions must also adapt to these trends, while strengthening their economic base, in order to increase their long-term growth potential.

2.2 Program: Business development

Program description

This program is intended to support the development of enterprises throughout their life-cycle in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth. Enterprises are recognized for generating a large share of economic activity and creating jobs. The Agency thus contributes to renewal of the pool of enterprises in Quebec by supporting the emergence of new enterprises and business succession. It also contributes to increasing the competitiveness of existing enterprises and ensuring their sustainability by enhancing their performance through the development of their production, innovation, commercialization and export capability. The Agency’s intervention in this program is carried out primarily in relation to enterprises or through organizations in support of enterprises and entrepreneurs. The Agency fosters the development of enterprises through the Quebec Economic Development Program grants and contributions program.

Financial resources (in thousands of dollars)

Total budgetary expenditures

Main Estimates 2013-14

Planned spending 2013-14 Planned spending 2014-15 Planned spending 2015-16
152,565 152,565 138,504 138,547
Human resources (FTE)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
147 143 143

Planned spending in 2013-14 includes an upward adjustment owing to the reinvestment of revenues from contribution repayments by clients. The fact that this same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2014-15 and 2015-16 partially explains the observed variations.

Implementation of the savings measures in Budget 2012 also explains the decline in financial and human resources.

Program performance expectations

To measure the results it has set itself, the Agency has established performance targets for its Business development program and associated subprograms. Program performance targets translate the results aimed at in the long term, whereas targets with respect to subprograms state what is aimed at in the shorter term. Further details on the Agency’s performance measurement strategy are presented at the end of Section 2.

Program: Business development
Expected results Performance indicators TargetsFootnote11 Target attainment scheduleFootnote12
The pool of enterprises in Quebec is renewed. Survival rate of enterprises supported in their startup 55% 2014-15
Survival rate of enterprises supported in their transfer 60% 2014-15
Quebec enterprises are competitive Survival rate of enterprises supported in their development 75% 2014-15
Subprogram: Support for entrepreneurship
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Target attainment schedule
Enterprises are started up or transferred. Number of enterprises started up 125 2013-14
Number of enterprises transferred 5 2013-14
Subprogram: Enterprises' performance
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Target attainment schedule
Enterprises improve their performance. Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their sales 65% 2013-14
Percentage of enterprises supported having maintained or increased their self-generated revenue 65% 2013-14

Planning highlights

While in general credit conditions have become more flexible and enterprises’ financial position has improved over the past year, credit conditions remain harsher for SMEs than for large companies. In view of the context of uncertainty and economic downturn, many SMEs will thus choose to postpone or interrupt their investment projects.

The fact remains that SMEs in Quebec have to continue to invest in their competitiveness in order to respond to the long-term economic trends of global competition, an aging population and a strong Canadian dollar. In that way, they will successfully develop and ensure their sustainability.

In this context, the Agency intends to support enterprises with a view to contributing to increasing the dynamism of Quebec’s economy. The Agency’s intervention with respect to Business development is associated with the Contribute to Quebec’s long-term economic growth and prosperity by supporting enterprises’ growth (directly or via NPOs), while paying particular attention to communities with lower growth potential priority. In order to pursue this priority, the Agency intends in particular to support entrepreneurship, as well as enterprises’ competitiveness and more specifically the productivity, expansion of manufacturing SMEs, innovation of SMEs, technology transfer, commercialization and exports.

2.3 Program: Regional economic development

Program description

This program is intended to support the economic development of the different regions in order to increase Quebec’s economic growth. Quebec regions are not homogeneous, and present a variety of contexts, with their own issues, challenges and assets. The regions’ participation in the economy is essential in ensuring Quebec’s economic growth. The Agency thus nurtures the strengthening of their economic base by supporting local stakeholders as they take charge of their economic development and by stimulating investment in all regions of Quebec. The Agency’s intervention in this program is carried out primarily in relation to organizations or enterprises. The Agency supports the development of the regions through the Quebec Economic Development Program grants and contributions program.

Financial resources (in thousands of dollars)

Total budgetary expenditures

Main Estimates 2013-14

Planned spending 2013-14 Planned spending 2014-15 Planned spending 2015-16
39,284 39,284 35,856 35,867
Human resources (FTE)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
38 38 38

Implementation of the savings measures in Budget 2012 explains the decline in financial resources.

Program performance expectations

To measure the results it has set itself, the Agency has established performance targets for its Regional economic development program and associated subprograms. Program performance targets translate the results aimed at in the long term, whereas targets with respect to subprograms state what is aimed at in the shorter term.

Program: Regional economic development
Expected result Performance indicators TargetsFootnote13 Target attainment schedule
Quebec regions have a stronger economic base. Value of total investment generated in regions supported that have completed implementation of their development project 90M$ 2014-15  
Value of spending by tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions supported 9G$ 2014-15
Value of direct foreign investment maintained or attracted to regions supported 1.8G$ 2014-15
Subprogram: Mobilization of regions
Expected result Performance indicator Target Target attainment schedule
Communities take charge of their economic development. Percentage of communities supported which implement mobilization projects 10% 2013-14
Subprogram: Investment in the regions
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Target attainment schedule
Quebec regions attract investment. Percentage of communities supported which implement economic community facility projects 75% 2013-14  
Number of tourists from outside Quebec attracted to the regions 5,400,000 2013-14
Number of international organizations and foreign firms maintained in or attracted to the regions 30 2013-14

Planning highlights

Just like enterprises, Quebec’s regions will be affected by the global context of economic uncertainty. The decline in economic and industrial activity will make it necessary to implement development and diversification plans for several regions. They will have to continue adapting to long-term economic trends by strengthening their economic base so as to increase their growth potential. The Agency, through this program, seeks to foster a climate and conditions conducive to the development of Quebec regions’ competitive advantages and the strengthening of their assets.

2.4 Program: Strengthening of community economies

Program description

In addition to its regular G&C program, the Agency is required to design, administer and implement Canada-wide programs or targeted ad-hoc initiatives that contribute to strengthening community economies so as to increase Quebec’s economic growth. The Agency thus supports the economic development of rural communities, through the Community Futures Program (CFP), and ensures the sound, effective management of infrastructure programs for Quebec. It also nurtures economic activity in Quebec communities undergoing economic shocks, faced with significant economic development challenges or having growth-generating opportunities to grasp, through dedicated temporary additional funding from the Government of Canada or specific funds allocated by the Agency. This program is aimed at enterprises and organizations.

Financial resources (in thousands of dollars)
Total budgetary expenditures

Main Estimates 2013-14
Planned spending 2013-14 Planned spending 2014-15 Planned spending 2015-16
48,272 48,272 32,469 32,296
Human resources (FTE)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
30 29 28

The drop in the Agency’s planned spending from 2013-14 to 2015-16 is attributable to the gradual decline in funding allocated under temporary initiatives and implementation of the savings measures in Budget 2012.

Program performance expectations

To measure the results it has set itself, the Agency has established performance targets for its Strengthening of community economies program and associated subprograms. Program performance targets translate the results aimed at in the long term, whereas targets with respect to subprograms state what is aimed at in the shorter term.

Program: Strengthening of community economies
Expected result Performance indicator TargetsFootnote14 Target attainment schedule
Quebec communities have stronger economies. Value of total investment generated in communities, by program and initiative

CFP: $744MFootnote15

Infrastructure: $345M

2014-15
CIIF: $60M Planetarium: $31M 2013-14
Subprogram: Community Futures Program
Expected result Performance indicators Targets Target attainment schedule
Communities are economically sustainable. Number of economic development initiatives implemented in communities following support from Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) 320 2013-14
Percentage of entrepreneurs undertaking pre-startup, startup or acquisition of an SME with support from regional development organizations (CFDCs and Business Development Centres [BDCs]) 50% 2013-14
Percentage of enterprises carrying out their recovery, expansion or modernization project with support from regional development organizations (CFDCs and BDCs) 70% 2013-14
Subprogram: Infrastructure modernization
Expected result Performance indicator Target Target attainment schedule
Quebec communities have upgraded public infrastructure. Number of communities with public infrastructure completed, during the year, according to the contribution terms 4 2013-14
Subprogram: Targeted ad-hoc support
Expected result Performance indicator Targets Target attainment schedule
Communities have ad-hoc support available for stabilizing or strengthening their economies. Percentage of communities supported, by initiative CIIF: 85% Ad-hoc project:Footnote16 100% 2013-14

Planning highlights

The economic challenges inherent in communities differ according to their economic base, but also on the basis of their socio-economic and geographical characteristics. Economic shocks and natural disasters hit certain communities harder than others.

In a context of uncertain, fragile economic growth, the Agency intends to pursue implementation of targeted ad-hoc programs and initiatives to support communities experiencing difficulties so they can stabilize their economies, strengthen their ability to take charge of their own development and achieve their full potential. Indeed, one of the Agency’s priorities is to contribute to strengthening the economy of regions and communities through targeted ad-hoc support, through the Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF).

In 2013-14, the Agency will continue implementing various ad-hoc initiatives:

Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF)

The Agency will continue until March 31, 2014, implementation of the CIIF, which aims to support the rehabilitation and improvement, including expansion, of existing community infrastructure.

Montréal Planetarium project

The Agency will continue until December 31, 2013, its support for the project to relocate the Montréal Planetarium and upgrade its facilities. The project is being carried out in partnership with the Quebec government, the City of Montréal and the private sector.

2.5 Program: Internal services

Program description

This program activity supports the Agency’s strategic outcome (Quebec’s regions have a growing economy). Internal services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to meet program needs and other general corporate obligations. They include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided specifically to a program. They lead to higher efficiency in program delivery, thus contributing to quality services for Canadians.

For the Agency, these groups are:

Financial resources (in thousands of dollars)
Total budgetary expenditures

Main Estimates 2013-14
Planned spending 2013-14 Planned spending 2014-15 Planned spending 2015-16
14,811 14,811 13,713 13,791
Human resources (FTE)
2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
99 91 91

Implementation of the measures provided for in Budget 2012 largely explains the decrease in financial and human resources.

Planning highlights

While the third priority (Continue the Agency’s transformation and modernization) is associated with all programs, it particularly involves Internal services. It means offering clients more accessible, more modern services, simplifying program implementation and building on a more modern, stimulating, efficient work environment.

Over the coming year, the Agency will continue its activities with respect to Internal services in support of the implementation of its programs, while ensuring that it maintains a skilled labour force, infrastructure and the processes necessary to fulfil its mandate and implement government-wide management priorities.

In 2013-14, the Agency intends to initiate or continue implementation of several initiatives, including the following:

Contribution to the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy

The Agency is a participant in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes, through the Internal services program, to attaining targets associated with the greening of government operations, particularly with respect to the following goals from Theme 4 of the FSDS:

For instance, the integration of environmental considerations into procurement processes is one of the projects currently under way that will contribute in particular to reducing the Agency’s environmental footprint.

Further information on Agency activities aimed at shrinking the environmental footprint is available in the table in Section 3 of the RPP entitled Greening of government operations.

Performance measurement strategy

The Agency’s performance management strategy is based on the systematic observation of outcome indicators as defined in its performance management framework. These indicators will be used to conduct ongoing measurement of targeted outcomes and provide material for the Agency’s operational and strategic decision-making during 2013-14.

Owing to their nature, anticipated outcomes will occur within a variable timeframe. Most will not be observable in the year in which disbursement is made. For instance, it is often only two years after the Agency’s intervention that the expected increase in sales by an enterprise receiving Agency funding for a commercialization strategy materializes. That is why the Agency’s performance measurement strategy is spread over a five-year horizon and why the yearly performance measurement reports will, in the initial years, be limited to intermediate outcomes, and subsequently to final outcomes (2014-15).

The data collection strategy with respect to intermediary groups (organizations providing services to enterprises) will be implemented progressively during 2013-14, with a view to enhancing yet further the availability and reliability of data on the Agency’s performance. Thus, the Agency is acquiring a means of measuring the impact of the services offered by the organizations to SMEs.

3. Supplementary Information

3.1 Main financial data

The detailed financial statements can be found on the Agency’s Website.

3.2 Future-oriented financial statements (unaudited)

Future-oriented consolidated statement of operations and Agency net financial position for the year ending March 31, 2014
(in thousands of dollars) Change ($) Planned results
2013-14
Estimated results
2012-13
Total expenses (5,720) 187,643 193,363
Total revenues 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding (5,720) 187,643 193,363
Agency's net financial position 331 (3,181) (3,512)
Condensed future-oriented statement of financial position for the year ending March 31, 2014
Condensed future-oriented statement of financial position
For the year ending March 31, 2014
(in thousands of dollars)
Change ($) Planned results
2013-14
Estimated results
2012-13
Total net liabilities (1,999) 39,023 41,022
Total net financial assets (1,407) 34,622 36,029
Agency's net debt (592) 4,401 4,993
Total net non-financial assets (261) 1,220 1,481
Agency's net financial position 331 (3,181) (3,512)

Description of future-oriented financial statements

The unaudited future-oriented financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles. The planned spending shown in the preceding tables was prepared on a cash basis. Tables reconciling these two accounting methods are presented in the Notes to the Agency’s Future-oriented Financial Statements (Note 5).

Under TBAS 1.2: Departmental and Agency Financial Statements, the Agency is required to present the net debt, represented by liabilities minus financial assets. As to the net financial position, this consists in net debt minus non-financial assets. Revenues, expenses and related accounts receivable and payable are presented net of non-respendable amounts and associated expenses. Note that total revenues for the Agency are zero, since they are earned on the government’s behalf. These revenues should amount to $818,000 in 2013-14 ($523,000 in 2012-13).

3.3 List of supplementary information tables

3.4 Tax Expenditures and Evaluation report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in Tax Expenditures and Evaluations.Footnote19 The tax measures presented in that publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Table: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Name of transfer payment program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) (voted item).

Implementation date: April 1, 2012

Termination date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: The program terms and conditions were approved by Treasury Board in 2011-12.

Strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Programs: Business development, Regional economic development and Strengthening community economies.

Description: The Agency’s Quebec Economic Development Program supports enterprises, organizations and regions facing constantly evolving economic challenges and issues. There are two main pillars to the program: Business development and Regional economic development. Moreover, targeted initiatives for which the Agency receives additional funding can be carried out by means of this program, through a third pillar—Strengthening community economies—involving targeted, ad-hoc support. This is a transfer payment program awarding repayable or non-repayable contributions, depending on the nature of the project, and, to a lesser extent, grants.

Expected results:

Business development:

Regional economic development:

Strengthening community economies:

(in thousands of dollars)
Transfer payment Forecast
spending
2012-13
Planned spending
2013-14
Planned spending
2014-15
Planned spending
2015-16
Grants 50 1,500 1,500 1,500
Contributions 178,731 180,999 148,123 148,123
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 178,781 182,499 149,623 149,623

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: Since this is a program which came into effect on April 1, 2012, no evaluation has yet been carried out.

Decision following results of last evaluation: N/A.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: The Agency will conduct a summative evaluation of the program by March 31, 2017, using the program’s performance measurement strategy, to take into account all transfer payments, on a five-year cycle. In line with the Policy on Evaluation, each impact evaluation will review the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and economy of the program and be used to inform the government on program performance.

Targeted recipient group: The main recipients under the QEDP are small and medium-sized enterprises, SME groups or associations, non-profit organizations, notably including those whose primary mission is to support businesses and foster economic development, but also asset-operating organizations, organizations or institutions dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of knowledge, including universities and educational institutions, the Quebec government, and municipalities and municipal organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: A strategic communications plan aimed at informing the public, SMEs and economic development agents in the regions of Quebec of the creation and implementation of the Agency’s simplified program has been drawn up, and its implementation is ongoing. Communications products have also been developed to publicize the simplified program.

Name of transfer payment program: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Implementation date: May 18, 1995

Termination date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: The program terms and conditions were renewed in 2010-11.

Strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Program: Strengthening community economies

Description: The CFP supports community economic development and builds communities’ capacity to achieve their full sustainable potential.

Expected results:

(in thousands of dollars)
Transfer payments Forecast
spending
2012-13
Planned spending
2013-14
Planned spending
2014-15
Planned spending
2015-16
Grants 0 0 0 0
Contributions 28,610 28,968 28,968 28,968
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 28,610 28,968 28,968 28,968

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: The evaluation of the CFP, in order to evaluate its timeliness, design, implementation and results, was completed in 2009-10.

Decision following results of last evaluation: Following the evaluation of the CFP, it was decided to continue this program.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: The Agency, along with the other departments delivering the CFP, will conduct an evaluation prior to June 2014 using the program’s performance measurement strategy, in order to take all transfer payments into account, on a five-year cycle. In line with the Policy on Evaluation, each evaluation will review the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and economy of the program and be used to inform the government on program performance.

Targeted recipient group: In Quebec, the CFP provides financial support for community development organizations, such as the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: A strategic communications plan has been drawn up for the CFP, with a view in particular to informing community development organizations and economic development stakeholders of the ongoing support offered by the Government of Canada through this program. Indeed, the ongoing federal support associated with the CFP was announced in Budget 2010.

Table: Greening of government operations (GGO)

The section on greening of government operations (GGO) is intended for departments and agencies which undertake to comply with the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the Policy on Green Procurement and the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec contributes to the attainment of five greening of government operations goals from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

Note that information presented in Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) concerns planned results, whereas information presented in Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) concerns actual results.

Surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) goal

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Existence of an implementation plan for disposal of all electronic and electrical equipment generated by the Agency during the 2010-11 baseline year. Yes, Commodity Management Framework  
Percentage of total number of Departmental locations whose electronic and electrical equipment plan has been fully implemented at the end of the given fiscal year. Targets
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. The Agency’s Commodity Management Framework covers the life cycle of assets, in particular electronic and electrical equipment. All possible disposal methods are covered in the Framework.
  2. The Agency uses Industry Canada’s Computers for Schools Program and the services of PWGSC for the disposal of Crown assets for reusing surplus electronic equipment, and uses departmental individual standing offers for e-waste recycling.
  3. Currently, the Agency has 14 locations (offices) across Quebec, and disposal of assets and equipment is centralized at the Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate (IMTA).

Printing unit reduction goal

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of Agency office employees to printing units for the 2010-11 baseline year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. Yes, Commodity Management Framework  
Proportion of Agency office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. Targets
FY
2011-12
N/A  
FY
2012-13
N/A  
FY
2013-14
8: 1  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: The Agency targets all buildings and premises in order to achieve the goal, even though certain buildings may have a smaller proportion owing to their occupancy level or security considerations.
  2. Definition of printing units: network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  3. Method used to determine the number of printing units: the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  4. Method used to determine the number of office employees: Population Affiliation Report from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).
  5. The target was established for 2013-14.
  6. The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  7. All Agency sectors are responsible for compliance with and attainment of the target.
  8. A communications strategy is in the process of being drawn up in order to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Paper consumption goal

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and applicable scope.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Number of sheets of office paper consumed or purchased per employee during the 2009-10 baseline year. 5,060  
Cumulative reduction in paper consumption, as a percentage, compared with the chosen baseline year. Targets
FY
2011-12
6%  
FY
2012-13
12%  
FY
2013-14
20%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Roles and responsibilities: paper purchasing is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the goal lies with all Agency sectors. The Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will handle monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  2. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices. The baseline year is 2009-10. The data concern only letter-size and legal-size white paper.
  3. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for head office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  4. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at head office, and will be broadening this application to all its offices.
  5. The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) now organizes paperless meetings with the assistance of the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate.
  6. Moreover, in order to reduce internal paper consumption at the Agency, a pilot project within the Operations Sector, aimed at carrying out steps in the project approval process without using paper, began in 2012-13 within the framework of the ad-hoc Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund initiative.
  7. A communications strategy is in the process of being developed in order to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Green meetings goal

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Adoption of a Guide for Greening Meetings Target  
2012-13  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope of the Guide for Greening Meetings: all departmental or interdepartmental meetings held in Agency offices.
  2. The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate has analysed existing documents already in use by other departments and adapted one of them to the Agency’s needs.
  3. The Guide for Greening Meetings will be adopted by the Departmental Management Committee in 2012-13.
  4. Role and responsibility: all sectors/directorates are responsible for attainment of the target.
  5. The challenge will be to monitor application of the Guide and report on its requirements. The use of telepresence will be an important component in achieving the green meeting goal.
  6. The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) now organizes paperless meetings with the assistance of the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate.
  7. A communications strategy will have to be drawn up to publicize the Guide and the means to be used to attain the target.

Green procurement goals

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMARTFootnote2 green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Adoption of a Guide for Greening Meetings Target  
2012-13  

Strategies and comments

  1. According to the Agency’s Technology Master Plan, renewal of all desktop computers takes place every three years, in a single purchase if possible. The latest renewal took place in 2011-12. Additional needs can arise, however, and ad-hoc purchases are then made.
  2. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for replacing desktop computers and reporting thereon.
  3. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases ENERGY STAR qualified equipment. This practice helps reduce energy consumption.
  4. In line with the Commodity Management Framework, the procurement of computer hardware is managed according to the principles of life cycle management, which includes the following four stages: planning and acquisition, operation, maintenance and disposal.
  5. In line with the Commodity Management Framework, the Agency optimizes the productivity and use of information technology assets throughout their life cycle.
As of March 31, 2014, 95% of new printers purchased will offer one or more environmental performance factors.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of printers purchased presenting environmental performance factors. Of the Agency's 215 printers, 180 are ENERGY STAR qualified and were purchased since 2007. 84%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets
FY
2011-12
95%  
FY
2012-13
95%  
FY
2013-14
95%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Printing units are defined as network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  2. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  3. The latest printer renewal took place in March 2010. An assessment of the condition of the printers is planned in 2013-14.
  4. Environmental performance factors will be identified for the selection of printers at the next renewal.
  5. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  6. More than 75% of photocopiers also have print and fax options, thus minimizing the number of machines.
  7. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases ENERGY STAR qualified equipment.
By March 31, 2014, 90% of copy paper purchased will contain at least 30% recycled material.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Percentage of paper purchased containing at least 30% recycled material out of the total volume of paper purchased during the 2009-10 baseline year 84%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets
FY
2011-12
50%*  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Paper is defined as 8.5 x 11, 8.5 x 14 and 11 x 17 paper.
  2. Roles and responsibilities: paper purchasing is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the goal lies with all Agency sectors. The Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will handle monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  3. Method used to determine paper consumption: the quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for head office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. * In the RPP 2011-12, the Agency presented targets for the purchase of recycled paper for 2011-12 to 2013-14, whereas information on the volume of that type of paper purchased for the baseline year was not yet available. Once the data on the volume of recycled paper for the 2009-10 baseline year were obtained, the targets for 2012-13 and 2013-14 were revised upward. The target for 2011-12 remained unchanged, in order to facilitate reporting in the DPR 2011-12.
  6. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at head office, and will be broadening this application to all its offices (use of 30% recycled paper, purchased via mandatory standing offer).
  7. A communications strategy is in the process of being drawn up to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Green procurement training goal

8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.

From April 1, 2011, 100% of employees (Procurement advisor and procurement officers) in the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will receive training on green procurement through Course C215 of the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS).
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees having taken CSPS Course C215 during the 2010-11 baseline year 67%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Two Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees will be concerned in 2013-14—one PG-03 and one PG-01—whereas in 2010-11, three employees were concerned.
  2. One of these two employees has taken the training. The second employee is to take the training in 2013-14.
  3. Training used: CSPS Course C215 on green procurement only.
  4. Reporting requirements: annual data collection from employees and the CSPS.
  5. Roles and responsibilities: the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring of and reporting on green procurement training.

Goal concerning integration of environmental considerations in performance evaluations

As of April 1, 2011, environmental considerations will be integrated into the performance evaluations of all the Agency's Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Percentage of the Agency's Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees having in their performance agreements an environmental consideration goal for procurement, for the 2010-11 baseline year 0%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Two Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees—one PG-03 and one PG-01—are concerned by the integration of environmental considerations in their performance evaluations.
  2. Since 2011-12, a SMART target has been included in the performance agreements of all Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate sector employees, in line with the process in place for the drafting of performance agreements.

Green procurement management processes and controls goal

By March 31, 2013, management processes and controls for procurement will ensure that environmental performance considerations are integrated in the procurement process.
Performance measurement   RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Number of processes revised in order to integrate environmental performance considerations, for the 2010-11 baseline year. 0  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year

(Number of processes to be revised: 4)
Targets
FY
2011-12
2  
FY
2012-13
4  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Currently, the four procurement processes are: the Commodity Management Framework, ISO procedure on procurement, request for proposals for drawing up a contract, and procedure for consulting and professional services.
  2. All processes will be revised so as to integrate good practices or enhance existing practices.
  3. Particular attention will be paid to action to be taken to comply with reporting requirements.

Remarks:

Table: Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations (next three fiscal years)

Upcoming Internal Audits

A service agreement has been established between the Internal Audit Sector of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada and Canada’s regional development agencies (RDAs), including the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec. This agreement, in effect since April 1, 2012, describes the internal audit services with which the OCG provides the RDAs.

In line with the agreement, a risk-based audit plan was developed for the RDAs in 2012. This plan presents the audits planned during 2012-13. The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec is included in the Audit of Monitoring and Reporting of Select Grants and Contributions Programs and the Extended Core Control Audit.

In 2013-14, the OCG will be developing a risk-based audit plan on behalf of the RDAs presenting the audits planned for the next three years.

Completed audit reports will be accessible on the Agency website.

Upcoming Evaluations
Name of evaluation Program Status Expected completion date
Evaluation of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund Strengthening community economies In progress 2013-14
Evaluation of the Business Support Fund and the Business Startup and Succession Fund – Planning and Implementation Strengthening community economies In progress 2013-14
Economic Impact Study of CED intervention in regard to SMEs Business development In progress 2013-14
Evaluation of the Canada Business Network Business development Planned 2013-14
Economic Impact Study of the Establishment of a Broadband Telecommunications Network in the James Bay territory Regional economic development Planned 2014-15
Evaluation of the Community Futures Program Strengthening community economies In progress 2014-15
Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec's Forest Economies Strengthening community economies Planned 2015-16
Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program Business development / Regional economic development In progress 2016-17

Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue

The following table presents the Agency’s non-respendable revenue by program. Non-respendable revenue consists of all non-tax revenue that will be credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Non-respendable revenue
(in thousands of dollars)
Programs Forecast revenue
2012-13
Planned revenue
2013-14
Planned revenue
2014-15
Planned revenue
2015-16
Business development
Repayable contributions 41,725 39,544 47,296 57,336
All other revenue 5,811 2,373 2,373 2,373
Regional economic development
Repayable contributions 111 228 226 226
All other revenue 39 46 46 46
Strengthening community economies 
Repayable contributions 8,231 13,623 17,641 20,548
All other revenue 1,272 571 571 571
Internal services
All other revenue 69 20 20 20
Total non-respendable revenue 57,258 56,405 68,173 81,120

Footnote1 All other revenue includes refunds of prior year expenditures, adjustments to prior year accruals, service fees, proceeds from disposal of Crown assets, interest revenues and other miscellaneous revenues.

Table: Details of Transfer Payment Programs (TPPs)

Name of transfer payment program: Quebec Economic Development Program (QEDP) (voted item).

Implementation date: April 1, 2012

Termination date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: The program terms and conditions were approved by Treasury Board in 2011-12.

Strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Programs: Business development, Regional economic development and Strengthening community economies.

Description: The Agency’s Quebec Economic Development Program supports enterprises, organizations and regions facing constantly evolving economic challenges and issues. There are two main pillars to the program: Business development and Regional economic development. Moreover, targeted initiatives for which the Agency receives additional funding can be carried out by means of this program, through a third pillar—Strengthening community economies—involving targeted, ad-hoc support. This is a transfer payment program awarding repayable or non-repayable contributions, depending on the nature of the project, and, to a lesser extent, grants.

Expected results:

Business development:

Regional economic development:

Strengthening community economies:

(in thousands of dollars)
Transfer payment Forecast
spending
2012-13
Planned spending
2013-14
Planned spending
2014-15
Planned spending
2015-16
Grants 50 1,500 1,500 1,500
Contributions 178,731 180,999 148,123 148,123
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 178,781 182,499 149,623 149,623

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: Since this is a program which came into effect on April 1, 2012, no evaluation has yet been carried out.

Decision following results of last evaluation: N/A.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: The Agency will conduct a summative evaluation of the program by March 31, 2017, using the program’s performance measurement strategy, to take into account all transfer payments, on a five-year cycle. In line with the Policy on Evaluation, each impact evaluation will review the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and economy of the program and be used to inform the government on program performance.

Targeted recipient group: The main recipients under the QEDP are small and medium-sized enterprises, SME groups or associations, non-profit organizations, notably including those whose primary mission is to support businesses and foster economic development, but also asset-operating organizations, organizations or institutions dedicated to the promotion and dissemination of knowledge, including universities and educational institutions, the Quebec government, and municipalities and municipal organizations.

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: A strategic communications plan aimed at informing the public, SMEs and economic development agents in the regions of Quebec of the creation and implementation of the Agency’s simplified program has been drawn up, and its implementation is ongoing. Communications products have also been developed to publicize the simplified program.



Name of transfer payment program: Community Futures Program (CFP)

Implementation date: May 18, 1995

Termination date: Indeterminate, in line with the Treasury Board of Canada Policy on Transfer Payments, in effect since October 1, 2008.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: The program terms and conditions were renewed in 2010-11.

Strategic outcome: Quebec’s regions have a growing economy.

Program: Strengthening community economies

Description: The CFP supports community economic development and builds communities’ capacity to achieve their full sustainable potential.

Expected results:

(in thousands of dollars)
Transfer payments Forecast
spending
2012-13
Planned spending
2013-14
Planned spending
2014-15
Planned spending
2015-16
Grants 0 0 0 0
Contributions 28,610 28,968 28,968 28,968
Other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0
Total transfer payments 28,610 28,968 28,968 28,968

Fiscal year of last completed evaluation: The evaluation of the CFP, in order to evaluate its timeliness, design, implementation and results, was completed in 2009-10.

Decision following results of last evaluation: Following the evaluation of the CFP, it was decided to continue this program.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation: The Agency, along with the other departments delivering the CFP, will conduct an evaluation prior to June 2014 using the program’s performance measurement strategy, in order to take all transfer payments into account, on a five-year cycle. In line with the Policy on Evaluation, each evaluation will review the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and economy of the program and be used to inform the government on program performance.

Targeted recipient group: In Quebec, the CFP provides financial support for community development organizations, such as the Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) and Business Development Centres (BDCs).

Initiatives to engage applicants and recipients: A strategic communications plan has been drawn up for the CFP, with a view in particular to informing community development organizations and economic development stakeholders of the ongoing support offered by the Government of Canada through this program. Indeed, the ongoing federal support associated with the CFP was announced in Budget 2010.

Table: Greening of government operations (GGO)

The section on greening of government operations (GGO) is intended for departments and agencies which undertake to comply with the Federal Sustainable Development Act, the Policy on Green Procurement and the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec contributes to the attainment of five greening of government operations goals from the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy.

Note that information presented in Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) concerns planned results, whereas information presented in Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs) concerns actual results.

Surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) goal

8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Existence of an implementation plan for disposal of all electronic and electrical equipment generated by the Agency during the 2010-11 baseline year. Yes, Commodity Management Framework  
Percentage of total number of Departmental locations whose electronic and electrical equipment plan has been fully implemented at the end of the given fiscal year. Targets  
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. The Agency’s Commodity Management Framework covers the life cycle of assets, in particular electronic and electrical equipment. All possible disposal methods are covered in the Framework.
  2. The Agency uses Industry Canada’s Computers for Schools Program and the services of PWGSC for the disposal of Crown assets for reusing surplus electronic equipment, and uses departmental individual standing offers for e-waste recycling.
  3. Currently, the Agency has 14 locations (offices) across Quebec, and disposal of assets and equipment is centralized at the Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate (IMTA).

Printing unit reduction goal

8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply target where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of Agency office employees to printing units for the 2010-11 baseline year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. 3: 1  
Proportion of Agency office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. Targets  
FY
2011-12
N/A  
FY
2012-13
N/A  
FY
2013-14
8: 1  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: The Agency targets all buildings and premises in order to achieve the goal, even though certain buildings may have a smaller proportion owing to their occupancy level or security considerations.
  2. Definition of printing units: network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  3. Method used to determine the number of printing units: the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  4. Method used to determine the number of office employees: Population Affiliation ReportNote 1 from the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS).
  5. The target was established for 2013-14.
  6. The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  7. All Agency sectors are responsible for compliance with and attainment of the target.
  8. A communications strategy is in the process of being drawn up in order to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Paper consumption goal

8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and applicable scope.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Number of sheets of office paper consumed or purchased per employee during the 2009-10 baseline year. 5,060  
Cumulative reduction in paper consumption, as a percentage, compared with the chosen baseline year. Targets  
FY
2011-12
6%  
FY
2012-13
12%  
FY
2013-14
20%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Roles and responsibilities: paper purchasing is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the goal lies with all Agency sectors. The Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will handle monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  2. Method used to determine paper consumption: The quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices. The baseline year is 2009-10. The data concern only letter-size and legal-size white paper.
  3. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for head office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  4. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at head office, and will be broadening this application to all its offices.
  5. The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) now organizes paperless meetings with the assistance of the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate.
  6. Moreover, in order to reduce internal paper consumption at the Agency, a pilot project within the Operations Sector, aimed at carrying out steps in the project approval process without using paper, began in 2012-13 within the framework of the ad-hoc Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund initiative.
  7. A communications strategy is in the process of being developed in order to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Green meetings goal

8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Adoption of a Guide for Greening Meetings Target  
2012-13  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope of the Guide for Greening Meetings: all departmental or interdepartmental meetings held in Agency offices.
  2. The Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate has analysed existing documents already in use by other departments and adapted one of them to the Agency’s needs.
  3. The Guide for Greening Meetings will be adopted by the Departmental Management Committee in 2012-13.
  4. Role and responsibility: all sectors/directorates are responsible for attainment of the target.
  5. The challenge will be to monitor application of the Guide and report on its requirements. The use of telepresence will be an important component in achieving the green meeting goal.
  6. The Departmental Management Committee (DMC) now organizes paperless meetings with the assistance of the Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate.
  7. A communications strategy will have to be drawn up to publicize the Guide and the means to be used to attain the target.

Green procurement goals

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMARTNote 2 green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

As of April 1, 2011, 95% of computer purchases will be based on an environmentally preferable model.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Ratio of purchases of computers which attain the goal to the total volume of computers purchased during the year in question N/A  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets  
FY
2011-12
95%  
FY
2012-13
95%  
FY
2013-14
95%  

Strategies and comments

  1. According to the Agency’s Technology Master Plan, renewal of all desktop computers takes place every three years, in a single purchase if possible. The latest renewal took place in 2011-12. Additional needs can arise, however, and ad-hoc purchases are then made.
  2. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for replacing desktop computers and reporting thereon.
  3. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases ENERGY STAR qualified equipment. This practice helps reduce energy consumption.
  4. In line with the Commodity Management Framework, the procurement of computer hardware is managed according to the principles of life cycle management, which includes the following four stages: planning and acquisition, operation, maintenance and disposal.
  5. In line with the Commodity Management Framework, the Agency optimizes the productivity and use of information technology assets throughout their life cycle.


As of March 31, 2014, 95% of new printers purchased will offer one or more environmental performance factors.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of printers purchased presenting environmental performance factors. Of the Agency’s 215 printers, 180 are ENERGY STAR qualified and were purchased since 2007. 84%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets  
FY
2011-12
N/A  
FY
2012-13
95%  
FY
2013-14
95%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Printing units are defined as network printers, local printers and multiplex units.
  2. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate keeps an updated list of all units in place.
  3. The latest printer renewal took place in March 2010. An assessment of the condition of the printers is planned in 2013-14.
  4. Environmental performance factors will be identified for the selection of printers at the next renewal.
  5. The Agency’s Information Management, Technology and Administration Directorate is responsible for monitoring attainment of the target.
  6. More than 75% of photocopiers also have print and fax options, thus minimizing the number of machines.
  7. When replacing electrical equipment, the Agency purchases ENERGY STAR qualified equipment.


By March 31, 2014, 90% of copy paper purchased will contain at least 30% recycled material.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Percentage of paper purchased containing at least 30% recycled material out of the total volume of paper purchased during the 2009-10 baseline year 100%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets  
FY
2011-12
50%*  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Paper is defined as 8.5 x 11, 8.5 x 14 and 11 x 17 paper.
  2. Roles and responsibilities: paper purchasing is decentralized. Responsibility for attaining the goal lies with all Agency sectors. The Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will handle monitoring, information collection and reporting for this.
  3. Method used to determine paper consumption: the quantity of paper purchased is determined manually from invoices.
  4. Reporting requirements: Each year, the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate collects data from all business offices and the Government Affairs Branch. Data for head office are centralized at the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate.
  5. * In the RPP 2011-12, the Agency presented targets for the purchase of recycled paper for 2011-12 to 2013-14, whereas information on the volume of that type of paper purchased for the baseline year was not yet available. Once the data on the volume of recycled paper for the 2009-10 baseline year were obtained, the targets for 2012-13 and 2013-14 were revised upward. The target for 2011-12 remained unchanged, in order to facilitate reporting in the DPR 2011-12.
  6. The Agency uses 100% recycled paper at head office, and will be broadening this application to all its offices (use of 30% recycled paper, purchased via mandatory standing offer).
  7. A communications strategy is in the process of being drawn up to raise all Agency employees’ awareness.

Green procurement training goal

8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision-making.

From April 1, 2011, 100% of employees (Procurement advisor and procurement officers) in the Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate will receive training on green procurement through Course C215 of the Canada School of Public Service (CSPS).
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Proportion of Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees having taken CSPS Course C215 during the 2010-11 baseline year 67%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets  
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Two Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees will be concerned in 2013-14—one PG-03 and one PG-01—whereas in 2010-11, three employees were concerned.
  2. One of these two employees has taken the training. The second employee is to take the training in 2013-14.
  3. Training used: CSPS Course C215 on green procurement only.
  4. Reporting requirements: annual data collection from employees and the CSPS.
  5. Roles and responsibilities: the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate is responsible for monitoring of and reporting on green procurement training.

Goal concerning integration of environmental considerations in performance evaluations

As of April 1, 2011, environmental considerations will be integrated into the performance evaluations of all the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Percentage of the Agency’s Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees having in their performance agreements an environmental consideration goal for procurement, for the 2010-11 baseline year 0%  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year Targets  
FY
2011-12
100%  
FY
2012-13
100%  
FY
2013-14
100%  

Strategies and comments

  1. Two Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate employees—one PG-03 and one PG-01—are concerned by the integration of environmental considerations in their performance evaluations.
  2. Since 2011-12, a SMART target has been included in the performance agreements of all Departmental Accounting, Collection and Procurement Directorate sector employees, in line with the process in place for the drafting of performance agreements.

Green procurement management processes and controls goal

By March 31, 2013, management processes and controls for procurement will ensure that environmental performance considerations are integrated in the procurement process.
Performance measurement RPP DPR
Progress toward goal    
Number of processes revised in order to integrate environmental performance considerations, for the 2010-11 baseline year.

(Number of processes to be revised: 4)
0  
Progress accomplished with respect to performance measurement for the given fiscal year (cumulative) Targets  
FY
2011-12
2  
FY
2012-13
4  

Strategies and comments

  1. Scope: Currently, the four procurement processes are: the Commodity Management Framework, ISO procedure on procurement, request for proposals for drawing up a contract, and procedure for consulting and professional services.
  2. All processes will be revised so as to integrate good practices or enhance existing practices.
  3. Particular attention will be paid to action to be taken to comply with reporting requirements.


Remarks:

Table: Upcoming Internal Audits and Evaluations (next three fiscal years)

Upcoming Internal Audits

A service agreement has been established between the Internal Audit Sector of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada and Canada’s regional development agencies (RDAs), including the Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec. This agreement, in effect since April 1, 2012, describes the internal audit services with which the OCG provides the RDAs.

In line with the agreement, a risk-based audit plan was developed for the RDAs in 2012. This plan presents the audits planned during 2012-13. The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec is included in the Audit of Monitoring and Reporting of Select Grants and Contributions Programs and the Extended Core Control Audit.

In 2013-14, the OCG will be developing a risk-based audit plan on behalf of the RDAs presenting the audits planned for the next three years.

Completed audit reports will be accessible on the Agency website.

Upcoming Evaluations

Name of evaluation Program Status Expected completion date
Evaluation of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund Strengthening community economies In progress 2013-14
Evaluation of the Business Support Fund and the Business Startup and Succession Fund – Planning and Implementation Strengthening community economies In progress 2013-14
Economic Impact Study of CED intervention in regard to SMEs Business development In progress 2013-14
Evaluation of the Canada Business Network Business development Planned 2013-14
Economic Impact Study of the Establishment of a Broadband Telecommunications Network in the James Bay territory Regional economic development Planned 2014-15
Evaluation of the Community Futures Program Strengthening community economies In progress 2014-15
Evaluation of the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec’s Forest Economies Strengthening community economies Planned 2015-16
Evaluation of the Quebec Economic Development Program Business development / Regional economic development In progress 2016-17

Table: Sources of Non-respendable Revenue

The following table presents the Agency’s non-respendable revenue by program. Non-respendable revenue consists of all non-tax revenue that will be credited to the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Non-respendable revenue
(in thousands of dollars)
Programs Forecast revenue
2012-13
Planned revenue
2013-14
Planned revenue
2014-15
Planned revenue
2015-16
Business development
Repayable contributions 41,725 39,544 47,296 57,336
All other revenueNote 1 5,811 2,373 2,373 2,373
Regional economic development
Repayable contributions 111 228 226 226
All other revenue 39 46 46 46
Strengthening community economies 
Repayable contributions 8,231 13,623 17,641 20,548
All other revenue 1,272 571 571 571
Internal services
All other revenue 69 20 20 20
Total non-respendable revenue 57,258   56,405   68,173   81,120
 

Back to note 1 All other revenue includes refunds of prior year expenditures, adjustments to prior year accruals, service fees, proceeds from disposal of Crown assets, interest revenues and other miscellaneous revenues.

4. Other items of interest

4.1 Contact information for the Agency resource-person

Pierre Bordeleau
Executive Director
Corporate Services

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec
Dominion Square Building
1255 Peel Street, Suite 900
Montréal, Quebec H3B 2T9
Telephone: 514-283-4565
Fax: 514-496-5449
E-mail: pierre.bordeleau@dec-ced.gc.ca

4.2 Additional information

Footnote 1

Quebec Economic Development Program

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

In 2013-14, the Agency will also continue its support for the large-scale, ad-hoc Montréal Planetarium project.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 3

In order to comply with the Treasury Board of Canada Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures (updated in 2012), the Agency will now be using the following terminology in its RPPs and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs): Program Alignment Architecture, program and subprogram, superseding the terms Program Activity Architecture, program activity and program subactivity.

Return to footnote 3 referrer

Footnote 4

This chart includes grants and contributions expenditures and operating expenditures. Internal services include only operating expenditures.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

The Agency has presented a revised PAA since 2012-13. It is therefore not possible to indicate actual expenditures from 2010-11 and 2011-12 for each of the programs currently in effect, since the breakdown of spending is different from that presented in prior Public Accounts. It will, however, be possible to do so in upcoming RPPs.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 6

Whole-of-government framework.

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Footnote 7

Since figures are rounded, they may not add up to the total indicated.

Return to footnote 7 referrer

Footnote 8

Planned spending in 2013-14 includes an upward adjustment owing to the reinvestment of revenues from contribution repayments by clients. The fact that this same adjustment is not included in planned spending for 2014-15 and 2015-16 partially explains the observed variations.

Return to footnote 8 referrer

Footnote 9

The information presented on Agency spending in connection with Canada’s Economic Action Plan refers to Phase 1 of the Plan, i.e., the measures provided for in Budget 2009. These measures, which all ended in 2011, consisted primarily of the Community Adjustment Fund and the Recreational Infrastructure Canada program. The Community Infrastructure Improvement Fund (CIIF) comes under Economic Action Plan 2012, announced in Budget 2012. CIIF-related expenditures are included in spending under temporary initiatives.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec Act

Return to footnote 10 referrer

Footnote 11

Expected results targets are established in line with the context of the Agency’s intervention and its priorities, Departmental risks, and resources, among other things. They are determined on the basis of historical data from implementation of the performance measurement strategy with respect to Agency intervention, as presented at the end of Section 2.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

Note that the target attainment schedule for programs lies at the end of FY 2014-15. Thus, the Agency will provide results with respect to its program targets in the Departmental Performance Report 2014-15.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Expected results targets are established in line with the context of the Agency’s intervention and its priorities, Departmental risks, and resources, among other things. They are determined on the basis of historical data from implementation of the performance measurement strategy with respect to Agency intervention, as presented at the end of Section 2.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

Expected results targets are established in line with the context of the Agency’s intervention and its priorities, departmental risks, and resources, among other things. They are determined on the basis of historical data from implementation of the performance measurement strategy with respect to Agency intervention, as presented at the end of Section 2.

Return to footnote 14 referrer

Footnote 15

Program targets for the CFP and the infrastructure programs are established on the basis of projects with expenditures since 2012-13.

Return to footnote 15 referrer

Footnote 16

The ad-hoc project continuing in 2013-14 is the Montréal Planetarium.

Return to footnote 16 referrer

Footnote 17

Refer to the Infrastructure Canada Website.

Return to footnote 17 referrer

Footnote 18

Management and monitoring services notably include evaluation, planning and program design.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Footnote 19

Tax Expenditures and Evaluation report

Return to footnote 19 referrer

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