Regional intervention strategies

Regional intervention strategies are defined according to Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions business offices.

To learn more, contact an advisor from your region's business office. He or she will be able to inform you, advise you or guide you in carrying out your project on the basis of the region’s action priorities and availability of Agency funding.

To find out which business office can help you, select your administrative region or search by postal code.

Abitibi-Témiscamingue - Nord-du-Québec

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: Similar administrative regions in terms of economy and structure / 192,469 inhabitants / 128 municipalities / 2% of population, 3% of economic mass and 59% of Quebec’s area / Low density (c. 3 inhabitants per km2) / RCMs with low economic growth (except Rouyn-Noranda and Vallée-de-l’Or) / Unemployment rate of 5.6% to 6.3% in the 4th quarter of 2016 versus 6.1% for all of Quebec.

  • Abitibi-Témiscamingue: Main industries revolve around sustainable exploitation of mining, forestry and water power potential / Exportable knowledge and expertise for SMEs / Transition of traditional sectors to new products, processes and innovative business models, clean technologies and integration of digital technologies / Presence of knowledge institutions (UQAT, CTRI and others) / Tourism and agri-food important for diversification / Shortage of qualified labour / Sensitive to economic cycles and fluctuations in the mining and forestry sectors (volatility of commodity prices, softwood lumber crisis, etc).

  • Nord-du-Québec: Importance of natural resources (mines, forestry) / Young and expanding population (Eeyou-Istchee and Nunavik) / Importance of business opportunities related to northern development (major mining projects, northern tourism, adoption of clean technologies to reduce fossil fuel use in remote communities, etc) / Low rate of educational attainment and scarcity of qualified labour / Region remote from main markets / Low population density with dispersal over a vast area.

  • First Nations and Inuit: 7 Algonquin communities, 9 Cree communities and 14 Inuit communities / 22% of the population of the two regions and 43% of Quebec’s First Nations and Inuit population.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Priority will be given to projects that enable enterprises to join the digital revolution and enhance their productivity by adopting and integrating computerized and information technologies. Innovative and growing SMEs seeking to start or increase their integration into global value chains will also get support.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • The business office will give priority of action to supporting start-ups and expansion and growth of SMEs which are developing and exporting new processes, products and equipment serving clean technologies and the circular economy. The business office will also support enterprises which adopt clean technologies in order to boost their productivity and reduce their environmental footprint (eg: development of new forest products that maximize use of wood fibre, integration of green energy into industrial processes).

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Priority will be given to projects that aim to mobilize drivers of economic development such as elaboration of economic development strategies using targeted community assets that enable job-creating local/regional SMEs to start up, expand and endure. The business office will also provide direct support to these SMEs commensurate with their contribution to economic diversification and job creation.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • The business office will support projects that contribute to the economic development of Indigenous and Inuit peoples, for instance projects that enable Indigenous enterprises and Indigenous/non-Indigenous joint ventures to break into the value chains of major northern projects as suppliers of goods and services (eg: business accommodation near large mining sites).
Bas-Saint-Laurent

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The region has 197,385 residents spread over eight regional county municipalities (RCMs): Kamouraska, Témiscouata, Rivière-du-Loup, Les Basques, Rimouski–Neigette, La Mitis, La Matanie and La Matapédia. In its 114 municipalities, 60% of the population is concentrated along the shoreline. Its major urban centres are Rimouski (49,291), Rivière-du-Loup (19,645) and Matane (14,206). The region is home to the Malécite de Viger First Nation.

  • Economy: The regional GDP (2015) was $7 billion, with 7% of the jobs in the primary sector (three times more than the Quebec average), 13% in manufacturing and 75% in the tertiary sector. Unemployment rate is 8%. The promising economic sectors are bioresources (bio-food, peat, agro-environment, forest products), wind energy, marine science and technology, tourism, and metal products and innovative materials.

  • Assets: The region has a strong innovation support network that is deployed in five college centres for technology transfer (CCTTs), four Cégeps and one university (UQAR/ISMER). The Bas-Saint-Laurent region is considered the Quebec marine technoregion. Natural resources are abundant, whether for peat moss, forest biomass, seafood, bio-food resources, wind energy, or landscapes for tourism.

  • Challenges: The region's challenges focus on population decline, an aging population, and an expected labour shortage.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Measures will be implemented to provide more enterprises with the opportunity to innovate, digitize, and grow, particularly in collaboration with the centres for technology transfer. The business office will also provide the Accelerated Growth Service.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • The business office will focus its direct interventions on existing enterprises or start-ups in the sectors associated with clean technology, including wind energy, marine technology, and bioresources. The transfer centres with expertise in this field will be associated with this effort through helping to acquire equipment or, in some cases, through implementing an enterprise start-up and development service offer.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • The business office will continue to support communities in difficulty that have mobilized to diversify their economy. It will support the creation and growth of enterprises that help strengthen the regional economy through job creation and retention, among other things. It will contribute to tourism development, an economic diversification driver, by backing projects that receive support from the regional tourism industry and show strong potential for attraction and by helping to promote tourism in markets outside Quebec.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • The business office will consider projects that promote economic development of First Nations on their land.
Centre-du-Québec

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: 8 RCMs in two administrative regions: Centre-du-Québec (5 RCMs) and eastern Montérégie (3 RCMs) / 393,604 inhabitants / 116 municipalities / 4.76% of population and 4.84% of GDP / 5 RCMs with strong economic growth (Drummond, Maskoutains, Arthabaska, Bécancour, Pierre De Saurel) and 3 RCMs with low economic growth (Nicolet-Yamaska, L’Érable, Acton) / Low unemployment rate at 5.3% in 2016 versus 7.1% for Quebec. Two Indigenous bands of the Abenaki Nation: Odanak and Wôlinak.

  • Economy: Large share of jobs in manufacturing (21% vs 12% for Qc). Biggest manufacturing region in Quebec, at 23.8% of its GDP. 11th out of 17 Quebec exporting regions. Three large and dynamic urban hubs (Drummondville, St-Hyacinthe, Victoriaville). Three heavily rural RCMs (Acton, Nicolet-Yamaska, L’Érable), whose economy is based largely on farming and forestry. Two RCMs heavily dependent on major contract givers (Pierre De Saurel, Bécancour).

  • Assets: Advantageous geographical position and road network. Diversified and dynamic economic base and large manufacturing sector. Regional economic actors are mobilized and structured. Presence of strategic infrastructure (industrial parks, incubators, coaching services). Developed entrepreneurial culture. Diversified and competitive sources of financing.

  • Challenges: Large share of low-technology manufacturers. Few direct manufacturing exports, mainly geared to the US market. Shortage of specialized labour. Steady decline of major contract givers and job losses have hurt the economic dynamics of the Pierre De Saurel and Bécancour RCMs.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Priority will be given to SMEs projects for innovating or adopting digital technologies. Projects of SMEs seeking to redirect and structure their product output to meet the demands of new markets so as to draw maximum benefit from their export marketing efforts will also get support.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • The business office will give priority to pre-start-ups, start-ups and growth of SMEs developing or adopting clean technologies and whose products, services and processes contribute to clean growth. The business office will also support research or technology-transfer organizations whose objectives are to increase the capacity of SMEs to innovate in the field of clean technologies.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Priority will be given to start-up and productivity projects for local and regional SMEs as they contribute to strengthen and diversify the economic base of rural areas and areas of low growth within the territory and maintenance and/or creation of jobs. The business office will work closely and complementarily with local partners to identify the most promising and pivotal projects in low-potential communities and those heavily dependent on major contract-givers.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • The business office will support projects that contribute to the economic development of Indigenous peoples, for instance projects of enterprises owned by Indigenous people on or off reserves and projects of SMEs not Indigenous-owned but affording economic development opportunities for the Abenaki Nation and its members. The business office will work in concert with the Abenaki Nation and local partners to identify promising projects.
Côte-Nord

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The Côte-Nord, extending from Tadoussac to just east of Blanc-Sablon, including Anticosti Island, is the second-largest region in Quebec in terms of area (21% of the province). It is divided into six regional county municipalities (RCMs): Basse-Côte-Nord, Caniapiscau, Haute-Côte-Nord, Manicouagan, Minganie and Sept-Rivières. The region has just under 94,000 inhabitants in 33 municipalities and nine Indigenous communities, including the cities of Sept-Îles and Baie-Comeau, where almost 50% of the population lives. The region’s population decreased by 5.5% between 2001 and 2015, compared with a 12% increase in Quebec over the same period.

  • Economy: The economy of the region is based on natural resource development. The Côte-Nord produces approximately 30% of Quebec's aluminum, 33% of its mineral products, 20% of the forest volume and 28% of the value of fisheries. The Côte-Nord's GDP represented a value of $7.1 billion in 2014, which was 2.1% of Quebec's GDP. In 2015, the predominance of natural resource development was reflected in the regional labour market, where jobs related to the primary sector represented a little more than double the Quebec average (4.7% compared to 2.1%).

  • Assets: Abundance of mineral, marine and forest resources, presence of major contract givers, access to the St. Lawrence Seaway, three major seaports (Baie-Comeau, Port-Cartier and Sept-Îles, as well as cruise ship ports of call), good air and rail service, and large untouched, wild areas with potential for tourist development.

  • Challenges: Limited pool of industrial SMEs, low rate of technology entrepreneurship, innovation, and intensity, SME's dependence on the regional market of major contract givers, a significant number of jobs that depend on industries that are in decline (fisheries and forestry: 36%), demographic decline, difficult for SMEs to attract and retain labour (competition from major contract givers, housing costs).

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Support projects that will increase technology intensity and the level of innovation of SMEs, in order to improve their competitiveness and allow them to broaden their market (development of new products, components or procedures, integration of new technologies, etc.). Offer the Accelerated Growth Service.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Support SME projects that attempt to reduce the environmental footprint or promote reclaiming of biomass and of residual materials (acquisition of clean technologies, development of new products, equipment and/or procedures).

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Help start up or grow businesses that will create or maintain jobs in sectors that will foster diversification of the regional economy, such as adventure tourism, ecotourism, accommodation, biofood processing, etc. Support international promotion and certain regional assets that will help attract tourists from outside Quebec. Participate in mobilization projects addressing the issues related to the tourism and biofood industries.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Contribute to promising projects that foster the economic development of Indigenous communities (business projects, studies & mobilization plans related to tourism, biofoods and, production of goods).
Estrie

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The territory served by the Estrie business office covers the administrative region of Estrie and two regional county municipalities (RCMs) in Montérégie (Haute-Yamaska and Brome-Missisquoi): 467,600 inhabitants, including 162,600 in Sherbrooke, 118 municipalities, Estrie is 33.4% rural vs. 19.1% for all Quebec; aging Estrie population (replacement rate of 87% vs. 96.6% in Quebec, 74.8% in 2021 vs. 81.3% for the province); employment rate and disposable income: Estrie 57.1%/$24,400 and Montérégie 62%/$27,200 vs. 60% and $26,000, respectively, in Quebec.

  • Economy:
  • 1,400 manufacturing companies (17% of jobs vs. 12% in Quebec); 75 foreign-owned subsidiaries.

    • One urban centre
    • (Sherbrooke CMA) containing a strong potential for innovation and innovative SME start-ups; five key sectors: life sciences, clean technology, micro/nanotechnology, ICT and advanced manufacturing.
    • Three central RCMs
    • (Haute-Yamaska, Brome-Missisquoi and Memphrémagog), industrialized but with more traditional sectors (rubber, plastics, metal, marble, agri-food), with the exception of microelectronics concentrated in Bromont; a main tourism hub of the Eastern Townships.
    • Five outlying RCMs
    • (Coaticook, Haut-Saint-François, Val-Saint-François, Les Sources and Le Granit) relying on the forestry, agri-food, mining and tourism industries, and the less developed and more traditional manufacturing industry. However, the presence of BRP and an intermodal terminal creates higher SME potential in the RCM of Val-Saint-François.
  • Assets: Important manufacturing sector, diversified and clustered in centres of excellence; proximity to US market; strong entrepreneurial culture and environment conducive to the development of a culture of innovation and innovative start-up companies.

  • Challenges: Increasing technology intensity and competitiveness of traditional sectors; reducing dependence on the US market for exports and attracting tourists; combatting the labour shortage.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Priority will be given to SME projects or the organizations that support them, which help increase innovative company start-ups, competitiveness and company growth, particularly through developing and improving products and procedures, adopting digital technologies, improving productivity, increasing production and developing markets. In addition, the business office will support initiatives aimed at improving support services for SMEs at various stages of their development. The business office will provide the Accelerated Growth Service to innovative businesses in the area; it will also focus on SMEs' awareness of the industrial and technological benefits arising from government contracts.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Particular attention will be paid to businesses that have developed clean technologies or that want to adopt such technologies, be it at the start-up, pre-market, marketing, expansion or export stage.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Projects contributing to diversification of low economic growth potential RCMs will be prioritized (creation and development of small enterprises, engagement plan, implementation of community economic facilities, etc.). The business office will also support projects aimed at strengthening the positioning of the region's tourism industry and at generating an increase in spending from out-of-province (non-Québec) tourists.
Gaspésie - Îles-de-la-Madeleine

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: Two distinct geographic areas: Îles-de-la-Madeleine archipelago and Gaspé peninsula / population 90,311: 14% on the archipelago / 4% decline in the region's population from 2011 to 2016 / 1.1% of Quebec's total population / 44 rural municipalities across 5 regional county municipalities (RCMs) and one equivalent territory and 3 Indigenous communities (including 1 off reserve) / Low rate of educational attainment and scarcity of qualified labour.

  • Economy: All RCMs in the region are experiencing slow economic growth / In January 2017, the unemployment rate was at 12%, compared with 6.3% for all of Quebec / The region's 35,200 jobs represent 0.9% of all jobs in the province / In terms of GDP, the region ranks last in Quebec (8.5% of Quebec's GDP).

  • Assets: World-renowned research centres (Merinov, Wind Energy TechnoCentre) / Exportable expertise for SMEs in the wind energy sector / Award-winning, internationally recognized tourist areas visited by tourists from around the world / Emerging sectors such as ICT and bio-food, which contribute to diversification / Opportunities related to sustainable fishing and vessel fleet renewal.

  • Challenges: The marked weakness of the manufacturing sector (nearly 130 businesses for the entire region, representing 6% of total jobs) / Jobs are predominantly in the service sector (82%), particularly in government services. Despite the emergence of new sectors, the GÎM region's economy is still based on traditional sectors, such as fishing, tourism and forestry. Region remote from main markets.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Priority will be given to SMEs' innovation projects or projects for the adoption of digital technologies.
    • Innovative and growing SMEs seeking to break into or expand their reach within global value chains will also receive support, as will their international marketing initiatives.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Priority will be given to the start-up and expansion of SMEs that are developing and exporting new processes, products and equipment related to clean technologies and the circular economy.
    • Prioritization of a stronger wind energy sector and international market development for businesses with strong potential in this sector.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Priority will be given to projects designed to mobilize drivers of economic development, such as the creation of economic development strategies that tap into regional assets to foster the start-up, expansion and continuity of local or regional job-creating SMEs. Support will also be given to SMEs that contribute to economic diversification and job creation.
    • Priority will be given to the development of new attractions as well as projects to renew the region's tourism offering, including accommodations.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Priority will be given to projects that contribute to the economic development of Indigenous peoples, particularly those projects that bring added value to the region's major niches (fishing, tourism, agri-food and wind energy). Support will also be given to economic diversification strategies for these communities.
Greater Montréal

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: 18 regional county municipalities (RCMs)/equivalent territories in five administrative regions: Montréal, Laval, Montérégie (10), Laurentides (4) and Lanaudière (2), including 5 RCMs with low economic potential. 142 municipalities. 4.37 million residents (53% of the population of Quebec). Three Aboriginal bands of the Mohawk Nation (Kahnawake, Kanesatake and Akwesasne), as well as a large off-reserve Aboriginal population. High Anglophone and immigrant population.

  • Economy: Economic heart of Quebec, with 57% of its GDP. Diversified economic structure that has been marked for over 30 years by tertiarization. Consolidation of major employment and innovation sectors around nine industry clusters (aerospace, aluminum, film and television, financial services, logistics and transport, fashion, life sciences, ICT, and clean technologies). 64% of Quebec's exporting establishments. Rich and growing start-up and entrepreneurial ecosystem. Quebec’s main academic and research centre, with notably 13 post-secondary institutions. 70% of the province's creative jobs.

  • Assets: Significant innovation capacity and infrastructure. Strong potential to attract workers and businesses. Proximity to major markets with abundant transport infrastructure (roads, airports, railways and ports) and efficient and effective intermodality. Dynamic business start-up ecosystem and many effective incubators and accelerators. High cultural and linguistic diversity.

  • Challenges: Weak business productivity in a context of increased international competition. Economic uncertainty on a global scale, specifically in regard to trade. Sectoral labour shortages. Integrating immigrants and refugees into the labour market. A multitude of stakeholders and complex local governance.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Increasing direct support for innovative businesses in pre-start-up and start-up phases in promising sectors, such as the life sciences and ICT, that target high-potential markets.
    • Favouring growth projects from innovative businesses that are committed to a digital approach or to developing new international markets, in growth markets where the Greater Montréal has a competitive edge on the global scale, such as aerospace or the creative industries.
    • Supporting the emergence and development of promising sectors in which the region has strengths: artificial intelligence, smart cities, virtual and augmented reality, and clean technologies, including electric vehicles.
    • Continuing to support certain clusters that structure the regional economic ecosystem as well as organizations that support entrepreneurship and help with the creation and start-up of innovative businesses, including for official language minority communities.
    • Supporting businesses that show accelerated growth.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Increasing support for the start-up and growth of clean technology businesses by supporting, for example, international marketing, equipment purchasing, or technology demonstration projects (showcases, prototypes, etc.).
    • Supporting the transfer and adoption of clean technologies, and international-calibre events that promote them and allow for networking between businesses.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • In the five RCMs with low economic potential, supporting diversification and development initiatives driven by local actors, as well as local and regional business growth and start-up projects that allow for job retention and growth and for diversification of the economic base.
    • Continuing to support organizations that help attract foreign investment and tourists, and that contribute to the Greater Montréal's international prestige.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Building relationships with Aboriginal communities in order to learn more about their challenges and needs, to make them aware of CED’s programs and to support them in their economic development.
    • Supporting projects from Aboriginal organizations or businesses that contribute to the economic development of communities and to promoting Aboriginal tourism on the international stage.
Mauricie

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The territory of Mauricie-Lanaudière encompasses 10 RCMs, two of them with strong economic growth (Trois-Rivières, Joliette) and eight with low economic growth (Shawinigan, Des Chenaux, Maskinongé, Mékinac, La Tuque, D’Autray, Matawinie and Montcalm), 92 municipalities and 3 Indigenous Atikamekw communities (Wemotaci, Manawane, Obedjiwan). A total of 479,647 people (5.9% of Quebec’s population) inhabit a territory of 52,471 km2.

  • Economy: The local economy (6% of Quebec’s GDP) is more diversified than it was historically because of a greater presence of SMEs in traditional manufacturing sectors (forest products, furniture, agri-food, metallurgy, plastics) working alongside emerging industries with a high technology content (aeronautics, mechanically welded equipment, transportation equipment, information technology and communications, green technologies). The unemployment rate is 6.8% in Mauricie and 7.2% in Lanaudière, compared to 6.9% for Quebec.

  • Assets: Advantageous geographical position and transportation infrastructures (highways, port and airport), an economy that still enjoys plentiful natural resources, but is less dependent on them and is becoming ever more diversified through the presence of technological SMEs, which can count on a university (UQTR) and four colleges centers with technology-transfer capabilities (CCTT).

  • Challenges: In a context of scarce specialized labour, the need to prepare the next generation of entrepreneurs and the dependency of manufacturing enterprises on the US market, productivity, modernization of processes and production, business innovation and market diversification already constitute major challenges and will continue to do so for a long time.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Directly supporting enterprises in their efforts to innovate and to commercialize the fruits of their innovation.
    • Prioritizing SMEs’ productivity projects which are part of the move to digital technologies, such as projects for implementing ERP systems and developing or adopting technological mechanisms targeting efficiency of production.
    • Supporting innovative business start-ups that contribute to the growth of sectors with a strong development potential.
    • Supporting enterprises belonging to value-added industries in their steps to break into the supply chains of major contract givers.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Promoting the development, adoption and commercialization of clean technologies and productivity or innovation projects of SMEs that are part of the move toward use or adoption of clean, environmentally friendly technologies.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Supporting projects aiming to provide weakened areas with distinctive assets, such as shared economic facilities that will generate significant economic benefits.
    • Supporting the start-up, maintenance and growth of SMEs in the most disadvantaged MRCs in their projects to improve productivity and increase production capacity (for example through expansion, acquisition of strategic equipment and optimization of processes).

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Supporting Indigenous communities in carrying out their projects.
    • Ensuring a more sustained presence in Indigenous communities and helping CED collaborators to support their development efforts.
Outaouais

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The Outaouais business office serves the entire Outaouais region, which includes four regional county municipalities (RCMs)—Pontiac, Papineau, Vallée-de-la-Gatineau, and Collines-de-l'Outaouais—as well as the city of Gatineau. Also in this territory are four RCMs from the Laurentides administrative region, namely, Antoine-Labelle, Laurentides, Pays-d'en-Haut and Argenteuil. These territories have a total population of 541,830 inhabitants, spread over 124 municipalities, including nearly 280,000 for the city of Gatineau. There are two Algonquin communities on the territory, namely, Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg and the Algonquins of Barriere Lake.

  • Economy: The economic structure of the Outaouais is highly centred on the service sector, given the federal public service’s presence. In Gatineau, there is a small pool of companies in the information and communications technology sector, but overall, there are very few manufacturing companies (4.4% of jobs vs. 12.1% in Quebec). The economy of the RCMs in the Laurentides region is particularly focused on the tourism industry (except that of Argenteuil) and the forestry sector. While Gatineau has good socio-economic indicators, the eight RCMs served are among the most devitalized in Quebec based on CED's Economic Development Index.

  • Assets: In the Outaouais, the presence of innovative businesses and a growing bilingual, highly qualified labour force in Gatineau; proximity to the Nation's Capital (tourism, innovation ecosystem). In the Laurentides region: large-scale tourist attractions (Mont-Tremblant, P'tit train du Nord trail); cluster of innovative companies in Argenteuil. In both regions: abundant mixed forest resources.

  • Challenges: To develop the innovation ecosystem still in its embryonic stage; increase the entrepreneurship rate (one of the lowest in Quebec); diversify the economic base in its territory, particularly in the devitalized RCMs.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • The business office will support the start-up and growth of innovative companies. Funding will be aimed towards support activities related to innovation in manufacturing companies to accelerate their adoption of technologies and the business office will provide the integrated approach of the Accelerated Growth Service.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • The business office will support the pre-start-up, start-up and growth of companies in the clean technology sector as well as projects that adopt such technologies. It will support the development of recycled materials and the creation of networks mandated to encourage the reuse of waste while improving cost-efficiency for its members (circular economy).

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • To enable all regions to participate in the economy to their full capacity, the business office will implement specific strategies adapted for each of the territories served, especially the most devitalized. These strategies will be established in partnership with local stakeholders. In addition, it will assist with the start-up and expansion of local and regional large-scale companies that contribute to job creation and diversification of the economy. Lastly, it will continue to support projects that attract customers from outside Quebec and Canada with solid benefits.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • The business office will support initiatives that target economic development of Algonquin communities in its territory, in line with their respective priorities.
Québec - Chaudière-Appalaches

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The Capitale-Nationale region consists of 59 municipalities, including six regional county municipalities (RCMs)—Charlevoix, Charlevoix-Est, L'Île-d'Orléans, La Côte-de-Beaupré, La Jacques-Cartier, and Portneuf—as well as Quebec City and the Aboriginal community of Wendake. The territory of Chaudière-Appalaches comprises 136 municipalities grouped into nine RCMs (Beauce-Sartigan, Bellechasse, Des Appalaches, L'Islet, La Nouvelle-Beauce, Les Etchemins, Lotbinière, Montmagny, Robert-Cliche) and the City of Lévis. In total, the two regions have a population of over 1.1 million (15% of the population of Quebec), including 542,000 in Quebec City and 144,000 in Lévis.

  • Economy: The Capitale-Nationale and Chaudière-Appalaches regions have the two lowest unemployment rates of Quebec’s regions and demonstrate consistent growth in GDP. There is a great deal of economic vitality in the CMA of Quebec City; however, several surrounding RCMs are experiencing slow economic growth. The 15 RCMs in the territory have diverse profiles, and 12 of them are considered to have low potential for economic growth based on CED's Economic Development Index.

  • Assets: A variety of research and transportation infrastructure. Stakeholder engagement in the growth of key sectors, including information and communications technologies, applied technology, life sciences and manufacturing. Diverse manufacturing sector, including 2,350 businesses, a majority of which export their products. Major tourism hub in Canada (Quebec City – 6th place).

  • Challenges: Addressing the skilled and bilingual labour shortage, attracting more venture capital, integrating digital development into manufacturing productivity support, ensuring the succession of businesses, supporting inclusive growth for devitalized RCMs and conserving the region's tourism-drawing power.

Priorities for action 2021

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Promote the development of new innovative enterprises and support their growth at each stage of their development.
    • Enhance support for enterprises that want to transition to digital.
    • Support the launch of the Accelerated Growth Service.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Maximize activities and outcomes of promoting research in the clean technologies sector.
    • Support emerging and developing enterprises in the clean technologies sector.
    • Support enterprises that want to adopt clean technologies.
    • Explore opportunities associated with the development of the green and smart building sector.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Support the attraction of foreign investment.
    • Strengthen tourism development efforts and outreach outside Quebec promoting the positioning of the destination.
    • Support collective entrepreneurship and structuring initiatives.
    • Support the consolidation of promising sectors by supporting local enterprises in devitalized communities.
    • Support enterprises that are part of regional value streams.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Increase the innovation, productivity and marketing capabilities of Aboriginal manufacturing companies.
    • Support the development and marketing of Aboriginal heritage tourism offerings.
Saguenay - Lac-Saint-Jean

Portrait of the region

  • Territory and population: The Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean region has the highest population of the resource regions at 277,657 (2016), located in 49 municipalities and grouped into 4 regional county municipalities (RCM) and one census metropolitan area (Saguenay). The region also contains an Aboriginal community (Mashteuiatsh).

  • Economy: The strong sectors in the regional economy are wood, aluminum and, to a lesser extent, agri-food and tourism.

  • Assets: The presence of an aluminum industrial cluster, the largest forestry region in Quebec, presence of a university (UQAC) and several research and technology transfer centres, large-scale natural sites (Saguenay Fjord, Lac Saint-Jean, Monts-Valin), strong position in the bio-food sector (AgroBoreal certification).

  • Challenges: Less diverse regional economy largely based on the forestry and aluminum production industries, aging population, population decline.

Priorities for action 2021 *

  1. Businesses supported by CED are innovative and growing
    • Innovation in the wood and aluminum processing sectors and in bio-food.
    • Adoption of digital technologies by SMEs and Accelerated Growth Service offered by the business office.
    • Increased SME productivity.
    • Enhancement of marketing and exporting activities.

  2. Businesses and regions supported by CED participate in an economy geared toward clean growth
    • Integration of new clean technologies by SMEs.
    • Implementation of projects related to the circular economy.
    • Development of bio-sourced products.

  3. Quebec communities benefit from strategic investment that promotes their economic diversification and participation in an inclusive economy
    • Development and implementation of economic diversification strategies in certain parts of the region.
    • Consolidation and development of the tourism offering.
    • Establishment and development of SMEs, promoting the diversification of the local economy and job creation.

  4. Indigenous peoples benefit from CED programs and participate in Quebec's economic growth
    • Establishment and launch of Aboriginal enterprises.
    • Development and promotion of Aboriginal tourism.
Date modified: